[11Missing-Girl]

[ANCHOR=Kim]

[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=jus]
[TAPE#=02-40 TC11:01]
[GRAPHIC=Jennifer Short]


We should know later today whether remains found last week in Rockingham County North Carolina are those of Jennifer Short.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Rockingham Co./Saturday; QUICK!!]


Preliminary observations from the North Carolina medical Examiner's Office reveal the remains are consistent with Jennifer's sex, race, and age.
Only D-N-A testing can say for sure. Those results are expected later today.
That news has Jennifer's family hoping for the best but preparing for the worst.
(///// SOT /////)
[SOT 16:59:33]
[IN Q=It's going to come]

((FRANK ARRINGTON/JENNIFER'S GREAT UNCLE: IT'S GOING TO COME OUT, WE HAVE TO KNOW WHAT IT IS BUT IT IS NOT SOMETHING THAT WE'RE LOOKING FORWARD TO BECAUSE IT COULD BE FOR THE WORSE AND WE KEEPING OUR FINGERS CROSSED, KEEPING OUR FAITH UP, KEEP PRAYING THAT IT IS NOT GOING TO BE JENNIFER.))
[SUPER=01-Frank Arrington/Jennifer's Great-Uncle]
[RUNS=:13]
[OUT Q=going to be Jennifer]
(------------)
[VO-NAT]


Henry County investigators returned to Rockingham County this weekend to look for more remains.
They, along with Rockingham County deputies, plan to drain a nearby pond today.
(------------)



[11Franklin-Body]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=dse]
[TAPE#=none]
[GRAPHIC=none]


Franklin County authorities have their own mystery to solve.
(XXXXXXXX)


They're trying to find out more about a body found inside a burned-out car in the Glade Hill area late Saturday night.
The sheriff said it's believed to be a woman, but investigators aren't sure of her identity or how she died.
An autopsy is expected to be performed later this morning.
(-------------)



[2-Iraq]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=net]
[GRAPHIC=none]


U-N weapons inspectors are beginning talks today, and preparing for meetings with Iraqi officials in Austria.


(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Vienna, Austria;]


A spokesperson for the agency says Iraq will be given the conditions of weapons inspections-- and there will be NO negotiations.
(///// SOT /////)
[SOT]
[IN Q=These talks]

((MELISSA FLEMING/INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY:THESE TALKS ARE ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL FOR OUR INSPECTORS TO BE ASSURED THAT THEY CAN FORM THEIR WORK." ))
[SUPER=01-Melissa Fleming/International Atomic Energy Agency;]
[RUNS=:08]
[OUT Q=to Baghdad.]
(------------)
[VO-NAT]


Fleming says the success of a new weapons inspection mission hinges on Saddam Hussein's promise of full cooperation.
Meanwhile, the U-S insists that inspectors have access to Saddam's palaces and other closed facilities.
The talks could provide the first glimpse into whether the Iraqi leader is serious about letting inspectors go where they please.
Saddam denies that Iraq has weapons of mass destruction.
(------------)



[Arafat]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=net]
[GRAPHIC=none]


Palestinian President Yasser Arafat received a hero's welcome when he emerged from his headquarters for the first time in 10 days.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Ramallah, West Bank;]


He re- appeared after Israeli forces backed off their blockade.
Israel had vowed to continue the siege until suspected militants in the compound were arrested.
Israeli leaders finally relented after the U-S and other countries pressured them to withdraw, saying their siege was having a negative effect on U-S policy throughout the Middle East.
(------------)


[11John]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=jus]
[TAPE#=02-32 TC2:02:20]
[GRAPHIC=None]


A survivor of the terrorist attacks in New York City brought his amazing story to Roanoke.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Roanoke]


Sujo John spoke yesterday morning at the Parkway Wesleyan Church.
He told the congregation how he narrowly escaped death inside the north tower of the World Trade Center.
John made it out alive but feared his pregnant wife who was in the south tower did not.
(//// SOT /////)
[SOT 3:21]
[IN Q=For those who worked]

((SUJO JOHN/WTC SURVIVOR: FOR THOSE WHO WORKED ON 9-11 AND THOSE WHO WORKED IN THE TOWERS, IT WAS JUST A NORMAL DAY, INNOCENT PEOPLE GOING TO WORK SO YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT A DAY COULD HAVE IN STORE FOR YOU SO ESSENTIAL THING IS TO BE AT PEACE WITHIN YOURSELF, TO BE AT PEACE WITH YOUR FAMILY, AND BE AT PEACE WITH GOD.))
[SUPER=01-Sujo John/WTC Survivor]
[RUNS=:16]
[OUT Q=peace with God]
(------------)
[VO-NAT]


John recently wrote a book chronicling his experiences on 9/11 titled "Do You Know Where You Are Going?"
You can find it at most bookstores.
(------------)





[Marketwatch]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Morn]
[WRITER=chr]
[TAPE#=NET]
[GRAPHIC=Business News]


In business news, After five straight losing weeks, Wall Street returns to work today. There will be plenty of economic reports for investors to watch for.
Alexis Christoforous has that story and more in this morning's Marketwatch.
(/////SOT/////)
[SOT]
[IN Q=]
[SUPER=01-Alexis Christoforous/Reporting; :00]
[RUNS=1:45]
[OUT Q=your local stocks]

((WALL STREET KICKS OFF THE FOURTH QUARTER ON A SOUR NOTE. THE DOW CHALKED UP ITS FIFTH STRAIGHT LOSING WEEK...AND THE SP 500 HAD ITS WORST QUARTERLY PERFORMANCE SINCE THE 1987 STOCK MARKET CRASH DOWN 16 PERCENT.
PROFIT WARNINGS AND NEWS OF MORE JOB CUTS COMBINED WITH A LOOMING THREAT OF WAR WITH IRAQ WEIGHED HEAVY ON INVESTORS.



ESS=dow

THE DOW TANKED 295 POINTS FOR THE WEEK IT FELL 3.6 PERCENT.

ESS=sp

SP 500 FELL 27 POINTS, DOWN 2.1 PERCENT FOR THE WEEK.

ESS=nasdaq

AND THE NASDAQ LOST 22 POINTS, BUT FELL 1.8 PERCENT.
THIS WEEK WILL ALSO BRING SOME TELLING ECONOMIC REPORTS... INCLUDING PERSONAL INCOME AND SPENDING... CONSTRUCTION SPENDING, FACTORY ORDERS AND THE SEPTEMBER UNEMPLOYMENT REPORT.
ESS=mo/dal

THE BIG LOSERS LAST WEEK INCLUDED PHILIP MORRIS, AFTER THE TOBACCO GIANT RAISED THE RED FLAG AND LOWERED PROFIT FORECASTS FOR THE YEAR. AND DELTA AIRLINES HAD ITS WINGS CLIPPED AFTER WARNING THAT IT WILL LOSE 350 MLN DOLLARS IN THE THIRD QTR AND LAYOFF OVER 11 THOUSAND FLIGHT ATTENDANTS.

ONCAM=alexis

THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE IS TURNING UP THE HEAT ON ANALSYTS... EXPECTED TO PROPOSE NEW INITIATIVES THAT WOULD FURTHER SEPARATE ANALYST RESEARCH FROM INVESTMENT BANKING AT WALL STREET FIRMS. THE DRAFT PROPOSES TO PROHIBIT RESEARCH ANALSYTS FROM PARTICIPATING IN PITCH MEETINGS WITH PROSPECTIVE INVESTMENT BANKING CLIENTS.

ESS=c

JUST LAST WEEK, IT WAS REPORTED THAT CITIGROUP MAY SETTLE CONFLICT OF INTEREST INVESTIGATIONS WITH NEW YORK.. THAT SETTLEMENT COULD INCLUDE PAYING A HEFTY FINE AND SEPARATING ITS RESEARCH AND INVESTMENT BANKING BUSINESSES.

ESS=animation

TRACK ALL THE PRE MARKET ACTION AT CBS.MW.COM IN NEW YORK I'M ALEXIS CHRISTOFOROUS.))


(tape tosses to stocks)

[STOCKS] [COMM]


[11Greenbrier-Body]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=dse]
[TAPE#=02-27 TC02:04]
[GRAPHIC=None]


A preliminary autopsy on a body found last week in Greenbrier County, West Virginia has left a medical examiner with unanswered questions.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Greenbrier Co., WV/Friday]


A motorist found the partially decomposed body on Thursday.
A State Police spokesman says the state medical examiner wasn't able to determine the body's age or gender.
Doctor James Kaplan wants a forensic anthropologist to look at the remains and won't release any information until that happens.
The anthropologist's examination could come as soon as today or as late as next week.
(------------)



[Labor-Clash]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=net]
[GRAPHIC=none]


Cargo ships at 29 major Pacific ports have been left high and dry--
Dock workers were ordered off the job after a breakdown in labor negotiations.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-San Francisco, CA;]


The longshoremen are at odds with the Pacific Maritime Association.
A prolonged walk-out could cost the U-S economy an estimated billion dollars a day.
Contract talks have stalled over the question of how to implement new technology on the waterfront.
The association will meet with the longshoremen's union today to try to work out a deal.
(------------)


[Small-Pox]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=net]
[GRAPHIC=none]


A top official with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease calls it "very reassuring" news--
He says the U-S now has more than enough smallpox vaccine to protect Americans in the event of a bio- terrorist attack.
That's because testing has shown that watered down doses can still be effective.
The last smallpox case in the United States was in 1949, and routine vaccination stopped in 1972.


[11Floyd-Fest]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=jus]
[TAPE#=02-31 TC1:07:20]
[GRAPHIC=Floyd Fest]


What a difference a day makes.
Friday, organizers of the Floyd World Music Festival were crying the blues.
But by the end of the three day event, they sang a happier tune.
Justin McLeod tells us why.
(///// SOT /////)
[SOT]
[IN Q=You could call it]
[SUPER=03-Patrick Co.; :00]
[SUPER=01-David Hurt/Festival Attendee; :10]
[SUPER=01-Teresa Maxey/Festival Attendee; :27]
[SUPER=@justin1; :50]
[SUPER=01-Kris Hodges/Festival Organizer; 1:10]
[RUNS=1:48]
[OUT Q=JM, News 7, Patrick County]

((((NAT SOUND OF MUSIC))
You could call it southwest Virginia's own version of Woodstock.
[SOT 11:49:56]
[IN Q=Wavy Gravy was here]

((DAVID HURT: WAVY GRAVY WAS HERE YESTERDAY AND IT'S KINDA A REUNION OF THE WOODSTOCK IN A WAY SO IT'S BEEN A LOT OF FUN.)) [Runs06]
[OUT Q=a lot of fun]


Fun that lasted three days and featured more than four hundred acts.
It was all part of the first ever Floyd World Music Festival nestled in the mountains off the Blue Ridge Parkway.
[SOT 12:00:10]
[IN Q=I just said to Hope here]

((TERESA MAXEY: I JUST SAID TO HOPE HERE HOW OFTEN THAT ARE YOU LAYING OUT IN A BLANKET WITH THIS BEAUTIFUL VIEW LISTENING TO GREAT MUSIC.)) [Runs07]
[OUT Q=to great music]

((NAT SOUND OF MUSIC))
Music that featured everything from bluegrass to African dancing. (NAT SOUND OF AFRICAN MUSIC)
They performed on three different stages and came from all over the region, across the country, and around the globe.

[SOT 12:13:55]
[IN Q=The crowds you see]

((JUSTIN McLEOD/REPORTING: THE CROWDS YOU SEE HERE ARE REALLY QUITE DIFFERENT FROM WHEN THEY WERE FRIDAY WHEN RAIN KEPT MOST PEOPLE AWAY ATTRACTING JUST SEVERAL HUNDRED PEOPLE. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, THE RAIN WAS GONE AND THE CROWDS GREW TO SEVERAL THOUSAND.)) [Runs11]
[OUT Q=to several thousand]

((NAT SOUND ON FILE TAPE AT 15:40:44))
The effects of Friday's rain were felt throughout the weekend.
Hay had to be brought in and many of the fields remained a muddy mess.
[SOT 11:35:48]
[IN Q=I'll tell you what]

((KRIS HODGES/FESTIVAL ORGANIZER: I'LL TELL YOU WHAT I WAS READY TO JUMP OFF THE MOUNTAIN OVER THERE, THAT'S HOW BAD THEY WERE, BUT ONCE YOU START SOMETHING YOU WORK ON THAT BUILDING AND YOU GET IT DONE.)) [Runs08]
[OUT Q=get it done]


The event failed to attract the more than ten thousand people organizers expected.
Even so, plans are already underway for next year's festival and most likely many of those you see here will be back.

[SOT 11:50:26]
[IN Q=A lot of times]

((DAVID HURT: A LOT TIMES IT'S PEOPLE THAT YOU HAVEN'T BEFORE BUT EVERYONE FEELS LIKE FAMILY SO IT'S LIKE A FAMILY RENUNION IN A WAY.)) [Runs07]
[OUT Q=in a way]


It's a reunion that began on a sour note but ended a high one. (NAT SOUND OF MUSIC)
Justin McLeod, News 7, Patrick County.))

(Kimberly tosses to bump)


[bump-chyron]

[comm #3]


[11Sullivan-Center]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=jwi]
[TAPE#=02-33 TC1:10:29]
[GRAPHIC=None]


A building that has been helping political refugees received a special dedication in Roanoke.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Roanoke;]

The Center for Refugee and Immigration Services on 9th Street became the Bishop Walter Sullivan Center during a dedication celebration.
(///// SOT /////)
[SOT 16:25:32]
[IN Q=Well, with the bishop]

((BARBARA SMITH/DIRECTOR OF REFUGEE SERVICES: WELL WITH THE BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE OF RICHMOND, BISHOP SULLIVAN, CELEBRATING 50 YEARS IN THE PRIESTHOOD NEXT YEAR WE WANTED TO HONOR HIM AND HONOR HIS COMMITMENT TO REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS BY DEDICATING THIS BUILDING.))
[SUPER=01-Barbara Smith/Director of Refugee Services;]
[RUNS=18]
[OUT Q=dedicating this building]
(------------)
[VO-NAT]

The Sullivan Center provides refugees with food and clothing and has apartments waiting for them when they arrive in Roanoke. Workers also help them learn English, get jobs and become a part of the Roanoke community. The director said there was a sharp decrease in the number of refugees after September Eleventh, but that that number is slowly increasing.
(------------)



[2-Small-Pox]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=none]
[GRAPHIC=none]


Some good news for the nation's health--
A top official with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease says the U-S now has more than enough smallpox vaccine to protect Americans, in the event of a bio- terrorist attack.
That's because testing has shown that watered down doses can still be effective.
The last smallpox case in the United States was in 1949, and routine vaccination stopped in 1972.


[Iraq]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Mornin]
[WRITER=kmc]
[TAPE#=net]
[GRAPHIC=none]


U-N weapons inspectors are holding closed-door meetings with Iraqi officials in Austria.
They're trying to work out details of their return to Iraq.
Inspectors say they'll hold Saddam Hussein to his pledge of unrestricted access to suspected weapons sites.
Melissa McDermott has the latest.
(///// SOT /////)
[SOT]
[IN Q=]
[SUPER=03-Washington, DC; :00]
[SUPER=03-Vienna, Austria; :05]
[SUPER=01-Melissa Fleming/International Atomic Energy Agency; :12]
[SUPER=01-Melissa McDermott/Reporting; 1:18]
[RUNS=1:30]
[OUT Q=McDermott, CBS News, New York.]

(( Take Pkg: While the debate over the merits of a war with Iraq continues on Capitol Hill, top U.N. weapons inspectors and Iraqi arms experts are negotiating the terms for the inspectors return to Baghdad.
SOT: MELISSA FLEMING, SPOKESWOMAN FOR THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

AGENCY "These talks are absolutely essential for our inspectors to be assured that they can form their work." They may be essential for warding off a full scale military attack as well. President Bush has already dismissed Saddam Hussein's offer to allow the inspectors to return under the terms of the U.N. sanctions already in place. He is trying to implement a tough new resolution that re-defines the power and range of the inspection teams.
SOT: MELISSA FLEMING, SPOKESWOMAN FOR THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

AGENCY: "The ones that are critical are the unannounced inspections. There we do not want to indicate where we are going. " So far Hussein has balked at Bush's efforts. He maintains that properties such as his sprawling palace complexes will remain off-limits.
SOT: MELISSA FLEMING, SPOKESWOMAN FOR THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

AGENCY: "Very important is also access not only to buildings but access to people. We need to be able to conduct interviews with anybody we want to see as well as to look through documents." The crisis in Iraq vibrates throughout the Middle East. The White House put intense pressure on Israel to end it's siege of Palestinian President Yassar Arafat's headquarters, saying it was complicating U.S. plans for any strike against Baghdad. That obstacle has now been removed.
Melissa McDermott, CBS News, NY. ))

[11Boty-Fire]


[ANCHOR=Kim]
[NEWSCAST=morn]
[WRITER=dse]
[TAPE#=02-38 TC26:08]
[GRAPHIC=Fire]


Fire caused major damage to a home in Botetourt County.
(------------)
[VO-NAT]
[SUPER=03-Botetourt Co.]


Firefighters were called to the home on Rabbit Way in the Blue Ridge area around 10 o-clock last night.
No one was injured in the blaze, but fire officials believe the house is a total loss.
(------------)



[1st-Business]


[ANCHOR=Kimberly]
[NEWSCAST=Morn]
[WRITER=ckor]
[TAPE#=NET]
[GRAPHIC=Business News]


In business news this morning, Things are looking up for K-Mart.
Here's Kirk Gallup with a look at the morning's top business stories..
(/////SOT/////)
[SOT]
[IN Q=]
[SUPER=01-Kirk Gallup/Reporting; :00]
[RUNS=1:16]
[OUT Q=I'm Kirk Gallup.]

(( GOOD MORNING, HERE'S WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS MONDAY, THE 30TH OF SEPTEMBER.
--------------------------


THE BLUE LIGHT ON K-MART'S FINANCES MAY SOON BE SHINING BRIGHTER.
OFFICIALS AT THE RETAIL STORE SAY IT WILL EMERGE FROM BANKRUPTCY EARLY NEXT SUMMER.
K-MART SAYS IT EXPECTS SALES TO IMPROVE THROUGHOUT THE REST OF THE YEAR.
THE RETAILER FILED FOR BANKRUPTCY IN JANUARY.
--------------------------


ONE HURDLE CLEARED IN SHELL OIL'S PURCHASE OF PENNZOIL-QUAKER STATE.
THE FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION HAS APPROVED THE DEAL FOR SHELL TO BUY THE PARENT COMPANY OF JIFFY LUBE.
THE NEARLY TWO BILLION DOLLAR MERGER IS EXPECTED TO RESULT IN A LOSS OF 12-HUNDRED JOBS.
THE DEAL WILL LIKELY BE COMPLETED BY THE END OF THE YEAR.
--------------------------


SPEAKING OF FLUIDS FOR YOUR CAR, GAS PRICES HAVE RISEN A LITTLE MORE THAN A PENNY.
THE LATEST LUNDBERG SURVEY OF 8-THOUSAND GAS STATIONS FINDS THE PRICE OF A GALLON, AVERAGING ALL GRADES, IS A BUCK-45.
ANAYLYST TRILBY LUNDBERG SAYS THIS CONTINUES A SIX-MONTH STABILIZING PRICE TREND.
HOWEVER, LUNDBERG SAYS A WAR WITH IRAQ WOULD LEAD TO GAS PRICE FLUCTUATIONS SIMILAR TO PREVIOUS YEARS.
--------------------------


WALL STREET STARTS THE WEEK ON A DOWN NOTE AGAIN...
NO MAJOR ECONOMIC NUMBERS ARE DUE OUT TODAY.
--------------------------


AND THAT'S THIS MORNING'S CHECK OF MONDAY'S BUSINESS NEWS.
I'M KIRK GALLUP.))

(tape tosses to stocks)

[STOCKS] [COMM]