The Alan Review
Current Editor
Wendy Glenn wendy.glenn@uconn.edu
Volume 37, Number 1
Fall 2009


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Call for Manuscripts

Submitting the Manuscript:

Manuscript submission guidelines are available on p. 2 of this issue and on our website at http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/. Note: The ALAN Review is adjusting its submission deadlines to allow more time for editing and production. The January 2010 deadline below represents a change from previous versions of this call. Beginning with the Fall 2010 issue, deadlines will be announced as follows: Fall issue, March 1; Winter issue, July 1; Summer issue, November 1.

2010 Winter Theme: Young Adult Literature in the 21st Century: “Scattering Light” on Our Freedom to Think, See, and Imagine

The theme of this issue asks us to imagine what it means to “scatter light” using young adult literature. Which pioneers in our field have encouraged us to “scatter light”? Which novels or poems encourage young readers to think about their pasts as they continue in the future? How does young adult literature help readers deal with adolescent issues as they think, see, and imagine those futures? What texts give “voice [to those who have] been pushed down hard” by school or society? This theme is meant to be open to interpretation, and we welcome manuscripts addressing pedagogy as well as theoretical concerns. General submissions are also welcome. Submission deadline: October 15, 2009

2010 Summer Theme: Interplay: Influence of Film, New Media, Digital Technology, and Image on YA Literature

The lines between various forms of media are frequently blurred for young adult readers; young adult novels increasingly have some combination of websites, blogs, fanfiction, and video games to accompany them. The theme of this issue asks us to consider the influences of film, new media, digital technology, and image on young adult novels. What does the interplay between digital media and young adult literature look like? How is young adult literature being influenced by digital media? What roles do film and image play in young adult literature? What are the reading experiences of young adults who “read” books in multiple media? Which novels and novel media help readers to question or critique society and the world? This theme is meant to be open to interpretation, and we welcome manuscripts addressing pedagogy as well as theoretical concerns. General submissions are also welcome. Submission deadline: January 5, 2010

2010 Fall Theme: Can I teach this? What does YA literature look like in the classroom?

One of the most frequent comments we hear from our preservice teachers is how much they like young adult literature, but how unprepared they feel to “teach” it in their future classrooms. They are worried not only about possible censorship issues, but also about whether or not the quality of YA literature is comparable to the “classics.” For this issue, we are seeking a broad range of articles that explore the ways teachers incorporate YA literature in the classroom. What are your experiences teaching YAL at any level? How do you prepare new teachers? How does teaching YAL compare with teaching the classics? How does it meet or trouble the standards in your environment? What are some quality texts that have been rewarding in the hands of students? This theme is meant to be open to interpretation, and we welcome manuscripts addressing pedagogy as well as theoretical concerns. General submissions are also welcome. Submission deadline: March 1, 2010

New Section

Got a story about young adult literature you’d like to share? We are starting a new section featuring brief vignettes (no more than 300 words) from practicing teachers and librarians who would like to share their interactions with students, parents, colleagues, and administrators around YA literature.


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