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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 17, Number 4
October 1963

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The Rudolph Henny Varieties Most Promising In The Eugene Area
Milton V. Walker, M.D., Eugene, Oregon

R. 'C.I.S.'
Fig. 38.  'C. I. S.' blooming in the garden of Cecil Smith

'C. I. S.': P.A. 1952 ('Loder's White' x 'Fabia') is by far the most popular of the Rudolph Henny hybrids in this area. It is a very fine bicolor that grows exceedingly well - almost too well in our damp cloudy weather. While a plant is young we find that yearly, rather ruthless, pruning seems advisable to control the exuberant growth and promote a strong framework for what will be a magnificent five foot specimen in about ten years. The vigor and ease of growing of this unusual colored hybrid is a joy to those of us who have struggled with the more delicate and slower growing varieties. The color combination, of crimson and creamy yellow, makes the four inch flowers of C.I.S. most attractive and distinct from any other hybrid on the market as far as we are aware. The flowers, on the inside, blend from a crimson at the margin of the petal to a deep creamy yellow toward the base, eventually fading to deep cream. The outside of the petals remains crimson during the lifetime of the flower. About the middle of May the abundant flowers that cover this fine plant make an arresting sight. In Eugene we feel that this is probably the best of the many good hybrids Rudolph Henny gave to the world.
'RED CLOUD': P.A. 1953 ('Tally Ho' x 'Corona') is another vigorous, upright growing hybrid that grows very well for us. The good trusses of red flowers show up well against the fine dark green foliage around the end of May.
'WHIMSEY': (R. souliei x 'Bowbells') is a fine pink hybrid that took the eye of Mr. Euan Cox when he visited the garden of Dr. Phetteplace at the time of the Rhododendron Conference. Later Rudolph Henny sent Mr. Cox a plant of 'Whimsey' for his garden in Perth, Scotland. The foliage and habit of this plant is much like that of 'Bow Bells' but the leaves may be smaller and more heart shaped. The flowers are usually a little larger and stand quite upright giving this plant with its delicate color a pleasant airiness befitting its name of 'Whimsey'. We find it a profuse bloomer about the third week of April.
        Other of the Rudolph Henny hybrids growing in the Eugene area are: 'Captain Jack': P. A. 1956 ('Mars x R. eriogynum); 'Cavalier': ('Pygmalion' x 'Tally Ho'); 'Goldbug': (R. croceum x 'Fabia'); 'Leona': ('Corona' x 'Dondis'); 'Little Pudding': P. A. 1953 (R. decorum x 'Fabia'; 'Little Sheba': P. A. 1954 ('Earl of Athlone' x 'Fabia' x R. forrestii var. repens)
        'FINCH': a clonal form of R. desquamatum, selected, named and propagated by Rudolph Henny is one of his most important contributions to the Rhododendron world. The original plant came from the Barto Garden about 1942 and is now at least fifteen feet in height and in apparent good health in the Henny garden. This outstanding form of R. desquamatum is absolutely hardy in the Eugene area and was not touched by the severe 1955 freeze. The blooms are larger than the usual form grown and are usually 1 inches across. The color of the bloom is described as "Mallow Purple" with just a few crimson spots being found.  We are greatly indebted to Rudolph Henny for naming and making this outstanding form of R. desquamatum available for our gardens as well as enriching our lives with the wonderful hybrids he developed.


Volume 17, Number 4
October 1963

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals