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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 20, Number 2
April 1966

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Planting Fields Arboretum Receives The Horticultural Society
of New York Citation for Distinguished Service to Horticulture

Gordon E. Jones accepting award
      Fig. 27.  Mr. Gordon E. Jones accepting award for
      Planting Fields Arboretum from Mr. Sherman Ewing
      of Horticultural Society of New York. The A.R.S.
      held a most enjoyable Annual Meeting at Planting Fields
      in 1965.

        Horticulture, especially in this area, is heavily indebted to the late Mr. William Robertson Coe, both for having created a large and distinguished garden estate, Planting Fields, at Oyster Bay, Long Island, and for finding a way to allow that estate to become an arboretum for the enjoyment and education of future generations.
        The directing genius of the administration and guidance of the future of Mr. Coe's great estate is "Planting Fields Foundation." It is led by the founder's son, a horticulturist in his own right, William Rogers Coe, who since 1953 has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of this Society.
        In addition to its great horticultural collection of specimen trees and shrubs, azaleas and rhododendrons, Planting Fields has made its contemporary contribution to horticulture by the design and establishment of the first "synoptic" area, i.e., a planting arranged in alphabetical order to demonstrate modern adaptation to gardens and homes.
        We therefore wish to honor Planting Fields not only for its beauty, its horticultural excellence, and its fine technique, but also for the spirit, accomplishments and intelligence of its personnel and leadership.
        The award is to be accepted by Mr. Gordon E. Jones, Director, whose new botanical plantings and educational demonstrations accrue to the great benefit of the very many visitors each year.
        Present and past accomplishments, plus the intelligence and dedication of its leadership, not only in preserving but in developing this great heritage for the present and future benefit of horticulture, deserve the Society's highest commendation.


Volume 20, Number 2
April 1966

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals