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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 2, Number 4
November 1948

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Minutes of the Meeting of the A.R.S., Portland, Oregon, September 21, 1948

        A meeting of the American Rhododendron Society was held Tuesday evening, September 21. 1948, in the auditorium of the Irvington School, at eight o'clock. President Henny brought the meeting to order promptly at eight o'clock. He called for the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting. It was moved, seconded, and unanimously approved that the minutes of the April 20, 1948 meeting be accepted.
        President Henny expressed appreciation of the Board of Directors and himself to Adolph Meyer who designed the rhododendron show, and to Mr. Jerry Barfoot, the manager, and also to the assistant manager. He said plans are under way for a larger and better show for the spring of 1949.
        The president announced that due to the fact that Henry Wallace had engaged the armory for the date that had been reserved for the sale of plants, that feature had to be cancelled. However, in order to carry on with that activity, a plant sale will be held October 22, 1948 in the Oregonian building at ten o'clock in the morning, and again at two o'clock in the afternoon.
        There was no old business to be considered.
        The president stated that the next regular meeting of the Society is scheduled to be held in Seattle, Washington, October 29, 1948. At this time, according to the by-laws, a nominating committee for 1949 and 1950 will be announced at that time. The voting will be by ballot, with possibly two names for each position.
        There followed an enthusiastic question-and-answer forum, in which specific troubles encountered in the growing of rhododendrons were carefully diagnosed by experienced growers. Comments were greatly enjoyed. Here was found proof that there is always an intelligent reason for good results in horticulture.

Q What is the name of the all-purpose dust that controls strawberry weevils which can be applied in the ground and raked into the soil around the affected plant?
A. Benzine Detra Chloride. For complete information, write to Mr. Richard M. Butterfield, University of California, Berkeley.

Q. How is the Test Garden progressing? Are any rhododendrons planted there yet?
A. In the absence of Mr. Slonecker, the chairman called upon Mr. Grace for a brief report. Mr. Grace stated that there are a few rhododendrons already planted in the park, although there has not been an official "planting" yet, because the park is not fenced. Work on the park has been retarded by prolonged rainy and wet weather last spring and summer. Those members who had faithfully worked on the park devoted strenuous days on work on the show. Last year a great deal of work was done in the park and it is hoped that the Society will give renewed attention to work in the park.

Q. Would it be possible to plant some larger plants, such as fortunei, in the park this fall, instead of next spring?
A. The Park Committee will take care of that. Mr. Grace brought several things to the meeting. Among them was a dead branch of a five-foot rhododendron 'Rosamond Millais'. Examination seemed to indicate that it was a victim of fungus Phytophthora. There also appeared to be evidence of borers.

Q. Could it be that severe root pruning and not cutting tops back when transplanting would cause plants to dry up and die?
A. That would result in an unequal distribution of root to top growth. Reduce the "outcome" in proportion to the "income" through the roots.

Q. An 'Unknown Warrior' had 17 buds and blooms, but this year it hasn't formed a single bud. During the last four years it has made about a foot of growth. Wondered if it is planted in too much shade, although it has some sun in the morning.
A. Take it up and set it in a tub of water for three days, and return it again to the soil. It probably has a hard ball on it. Mr. Grace was reminded of the story that Lord Aberconway often had taken a wheelbarrow and moved "unhappy" rhododendrons to another place.

Q. What causes one branch to die on Wilsoni species, an Oregon native?
A. That sounds like twig blight which resembles the die-back of fruit trees. An application of Bordeaux solution should be sprayed on it. Usually it is caused by excessive watering, and growth is too soft.

Q. Is fresh sawdust beneficial?
A. If nitrogen is used to counteract it. When sawdust is used as a mulch, nitrates must be incorporated in the soil. This sawdust question resolved itself into an interesting debate in which the pros and cons were thoroughly expounded, although the listener found himself in the exact spot where we started.

Q. Where is Cottage Gardens?
A. It is a large nursery in Eureka, California.

Q. Has anyone had any experience with 'Rosatta', a deep blush blue? It is slowly dying. And would it need sun or shade?
A. Too heavy a soil, not enough ventilation. Suggested that chopped turf and gravel be added. Full sun, as long as it is not a south exposure.

        After a five minute recess, the room was darkened and Mr. Bacher entertained with a showing of his delightful collection of colored slides. Some choice pictures of the show were included. Sparkling colors and types of thrilling blooms of excellent variety and quality, absorbed the attention of all.
        Concluding business was resumed with the return of the lights. It was moved, seconded and agreed unanimously that the Rhododendron Society would hold another meeting about the middle of November, the exact date of which would be sent out by mail.
        Mr. George Grace was asked if he had heard from Mr. Rock in China. He replied that Mr. Rock is out in the field on an expedition. It will probably be his last quest for plants. Within the next year or so, some very wonderful things will come out of China, as he is collecting rhododendrons, lilies and magnolias. He has found an entirely new lily and he is going into a region where rhododendrons have never been explored before. Either in the Bulletin, or at the next meeting we will hear more of him. No word has been received from Kingdom Ward.
        The meeting adjourned at 9:40 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Secretary.


Volume 2, Number 4
November 1948

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