Logo for the Journal American Rhododendron Society

Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 32, Number 4
Fall 1978

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals

Rhododendron Prostratum
Arthur P. Dome, Seattle, Washington

R. prostratum
R. prostratum
Photo by Art Dome
  
R. prostratum bristles
R. prostratum bristles
Photo by Art Dome

        Rhododendron prostratum is another member of the Saluenense Series that can be a very desirable and interesting garden subject. One can enhance its desirability by starting with a small plant. Grow it in a rich, light, moist media and pinch the terminal shoots frequently to promote branching. After a good base of many terminal shoots have been established it usually maintains itself as a neat growing shrublet.
        R. prostratum has more of an ascending type habit of growth than a prostrate one. In some areas forms of R. keleticum have been grown under the name of R. prostratum mainly because of its prostrate habit.
        One of the first points to look for in determining the identity of R. prostratum are the bristles that cover the branchlets (see illustration) versus none at all on R. keleticum or R. radicans. However, don't confuse it with R. chameunum which has a more robust, upright habit of growth with larger leaves.
        The blooms of R. prostratum are usually lighter in color than those of R. keleticum. They also have fewer spots which are usually lighter in color and the individual blooms are not quite as flat. The flower stalks of R. prostratum are also quite bristly (see illustration) while those of R. keleticum have none and tend to be on the scaley side.
        R. prostratum can be propagated readily from cuttings.


Volume 32, Number 4
Fall 1978

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals