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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 39, Number 4
Fall 1985

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Rhododendron anwheiense, Huang Shan, Anhui Province, China
Richard Pearson, Vancouver, B.C.

        Peter Cox mentions R. anwheiense as a "little tried species with fine pink flowers freely produced" (1973: 242). This species is famous in the Huang Shan mountains, and is termed in Chinese the Huang Shan Dujuan, the Huang Shan rhododendron (Young and Chong 1980: 251). It was photographed just coming into bloom in open rocky areas and thin woods near the Beihai Pavilion and the Jade Screen Hotel, near the highest peaks, which are just over 1800 meters. The mountains are composed of granite, and are some of the most scenic in China. They rise abruptly from low ranges in Anhui, at 30°1" north latitude, and 118°1" east longitude. The environment reminded me a great deal of the high peaks of Miyanoura, Yakushima, which are virtually the same elevation and latitude.

R. anwheiense truss
Opening truss of R. anwheiense
Photo by Richard Pearson

        This species is closely related to R. pseudochrysanthum, found across the Taiwan Strait on the peaks of Taiwan. While the vegetation of Huang Shan appears to have been thinned near the summits in recent times, it appears that many of the plants grow in relatively exposed rocky outcrops in full sun, but are regularly refreshed with abundant cloud and rain.

Peaks near the Beihei    R. anwheiense and the Jade Screen Hotel
Peaks near the Beihei, at the lower
edge of the distribution of
R. anwheiense

Photo by Richard Pearson
   R. anwheiense and the
Jade Screen Hotel
 
Photo by Richard Pearson

        Plants found in the same area include Magnolia denudata, Magnolia cylindrica, Prunus, Zelkova, wonderful violets with finely divided leaves, and magnificent pines. Trails of stone steps, with myriads of hikers, literally hang to the steep slopes of these mountains, so that, from a distance, they look like thin ribbons draped over them.

References Cited
Cox, P.A. 1973 Dwarf Rhododendrons. New York. Macmillan.
Young, J. and L.S. Chong (trans) 1980 Rhododendrons of China. Portland. Binford and Mort.


Volume 39, Number 4
Fall 1985

DLA Ejournal Home | JARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals