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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 48, Number 3
Summer 1994

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One Member's Effort at Breeding Hardy Yellows
Anthony Angelini
Torrington, Connecticut

        My efforts to breed a hardy yellow rhododendron started some years ago when I saw a yellow rhododendron developed by ARS member Ed Robbins. He named it 'Butter'.* The cross was claimed to be 'Dexter's Champagne'* x R. campylocarpum, but some of our members think the cross was probably 'Dexter's Champagne' x R. dichroanthum.
        Whatever the cross, 'Butter' seems to be an excellent parent and is generous with pollen. It has a clear yellow color, but is lanky in growth and only bud hardy to about -5°F. After Ed Robbins died approximately 10 years ago, the original plant traveled to parts unknown. I had obtained a single cutting and succeeded in rooting it. I made grafts and rooted cuttings and gave them or plants to other members.
        I crossed 'Dexter's Champagne' with 'Butter', and after nature removed the weak seedlings and I discarded the undesirables I was left with about six plants worth saving, those with yellow colored flowers similar to 'Butter'. 'Dexter's Champagne' x 'Butter' #1 and #2 are the best of the lot. The only one with both stamens and pistils is #1, so of course I use its pollen on my yellow crosses. These two plants are about 3 to 4 feet high and have flowered the last five years with temperatures of about -10°F or lower.

('Dexter's Champagne' x 'Butter') #1
('Dexter's Champagne' x 'Butter') #1
Photo by Anthony Angelini
 
('Dexter's Champagne' x 'Butter') #2
('Dexter's Champagne' x 'Butter') #2
Photo by Anthony Angelini

        Of course, the wish is to develop a bushy plant like 'Boule de Neige' and/or a "yak"-type plant with yellow flowers. To this end I have made a number of crosses. I have about 40 two-year-old seedlings of the cross #2 x #1, and it will be interesting to see what develops.
        Seed from several of my yellow crosses is available from the ARS Seed Exchange this year.

Anthony Angelini is a member of the Connecticut Chapter.

Editor's Note: * Name is unregistered.


Volume 48, Number 3
Summer 1994

DLA Ejournal Home | JARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals