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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 4, Number 1
January 1950

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Book Review
Rudolph Henny

Shrubs For The Milder Countries, W. Arnold Forster, foreword by the Rt. Host. Lord Aberconway, 10 full page illustrations, 367 Pages, Country Life Ltd., 2-10 Tavistock St. Covent Garden W.C.2 London, Charles Scribner's Sons, New York

        This single edition fills a long needed want, for gardeners in milder climates. Each interesting chapter contains valuable notes and information on many of the finest shrubs and trees in the world. I may mention that possibly not a few of the described plants and trees border on the near tropical, but as has been the case many times, often in sheltered locations such plants survive and even thrive for many years.
        For most of the Pacific Coast and in favored localities in the South and South East this book may well be a guide to only the finest landscape material. Many of these plants are quite new and untried in the United States.
        A down to earth discussion of shelter from wind and frost for tender plants is well written with much information, applicable to the practical garden. The succeeding chapters on Acacias, Camellias, Ceanothus, Eucalyptus, Magnolias, Southern beeches, Olearias, Prunus and Rhododendron and Azaleas are highly informative in cultural notes and most of all in the guidance towards the finest and most desirable varieties.
        The chapter on Magnolias by G. H. Johnstone is one of the very best. Beside the mention of all the best varieties Mr. Johnstone adds many notes of value.
        Many of the plants mentioned in the chapter dealing with rhododendron are tender even here on the West Coast, and occasionally are cut to the ground during a severe Winter. Many new hybrids are mentioned as are the fine dwarf species and larger growing sorts.
        The edition is well indexed and notes on varieties can readily be found. The gardener may safely follow the recommendations of this volume with confidence and even the mildly interested gardener will find himself perusing each chapter with avid interest.


Volume 4, Number 1
January 1950

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals