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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 52, Number 1
Winter 1998

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In Memoriam: Ernest Dzurick

        Ernest Dzurick, born in Houston, Mo., on Aug. 25, 1916, passed away Sept. 7, 1997. He graduated from Enumclaw High School in 1934 and from Western Washington State College in Bellingham, Wash., in 1939. He taught school in Enumclaw and Seattle until his retirement in 1974. Following are friends' remembrances of him:
"... Ernie first became interested in rhododendrons when Bernie Swenson visited Ernie's biology classroom. Bernie saw the plants Ernie was growing in the classroom and told Ernie he should be growing rhododendrons and invited him to come to the next Seattle Rhododendron Society meetings. From then on, rhododendrons were the joy of Ernie's life."
Lynn Watts
"Ernie was a very special friend of mine. I first knew him in 1939 in Enumclaw where I was a student of his. He was also my assistant football coach...It wasn't until 1961 that we met again at a Seattle Rhododendron Society meeting. After that we made a rhododendron trip together including two to England and Scotland, and both of us became members of the Niphargum club, where we had a great many social good times. No one was easier to get along with than Ernie. I am sure all of his many friends will agree that he was one fine fellow. We will certainly miss him."
Warren Berg
"Ernie had the unique quality of seeing the best of any situation - when he visited any garden he was able to point out the unique features and describe these to others."
Frank Doleshy
"...Ernie and I had both been in Great Britain before, but we conspired in 1979 to go again, just the two of us. I did the driving, Ernie did the diplomacy and navigation. Peter Cox graciously arranged a visit to Black Hills in Northern Scotland, home of Sylvester Cristie. We were to arrive at 11 a.m. Ernie tapped on the door; it opened. 'Ah, gentlemen, you're two minutes late!' Ernie explained we had traveled halfway around the world to see his plants, several in particular. We ended up staying six hours at his insistence!...Windsor Great Park is always special. John Bond asked us what we wanted to see. Without hesitation, Ernie said, The yaks and the Taliensias.'...Wherever Ernie Dzurick is, he is asking the head gardener, 'Where are the Taliensia located and do you have the true R. coeloneuron?'"
Milt Tanggard


Volume 52, Number 1
Winter 1998

DLA Ejournal Home | JARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals