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Journal American Rhododendron Society

Current Editor:
Dr. Glen Jamieson ars.editor@gmail.com


Volume 6, Number 1
January 1952

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Rhododendrons in Our Garden
by Wales Wood

        Many amateurs, if not all, who fall victim to the hobby of collecting and growing Rhododendrons, share a similar experience. They start with perhaps one or two plants as a foundation planting; they become interested in the plants and acquire a few more. The number of plants increases yearly until all apparent space in the garden is filled.
        At this particular stage of collecting, the dwarf and semi-dwarf Rhododendrons suggest themselves for their various possibilities of use as ground cover among the large growing varieties, for edging along paths and as specimen plants in the rockery. The dwarf and semi-dwarf groups may lack the floral show of the larger varieties, but they more than compensate for this in interesting variations of form, foliage and color. Ease of handling the smaller plants is a real asset. The blooming season of these plants extends. from the latter part of February to the latter part of June.
        The following notes that I make here are on a few of the dwarf and semi-dwarf varieties that have proven satisfactory in our garden.

        Many of the hybrids recommended for the rockery, such as R. 'Dido', R. 'Bow Bells', R. 'Rubina', R. 'Red Cap', R. 'Medusa', R. 'Goblin', R. 'Erebus', and R. 'Mohamet' have grown too vigorously for our rock garden.
        Digressing from the subject of dwarf and semi-dwarf rhododendrons, there are two deciduous azaleas that never fail to give us beautiful blooms each spring and beautiful fall foliage each fall. Azalea rhombicum gives forth with large magenta blooms and combines well with the bloom of our native dogwood. Azalea schlippenbachii produces a profusion of large apple-blossom pink blooms and is as lovely a sight as could be desired.
        One matter that has concerned me is why the commercial growers in the Pacific Northwest have gone to so much trouble and expense to import so many hybrids from Great Britain and have imported so few of the rated species? In the past years, and even at the present time, the acquisition of good species is a great problem and full of disappointments.
        There is also one question I would like to ask Dr. Clark after reading his article "Rhododendrons as a Hobby" published in the July, 1951 Bulletin. Does he really think that rhododendrons, as a hobby, give relief from frustration? I am of the impression that it works the other way.


Volume 6, Number 1
January 1952

DLA Ejournal Home | QBARS Home | Table of Contents for this issue | Search JARS and other ejournals