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Journal of Vocational and Technical Education

Editor:
Kirk Swortzel:   kswortzel@ais.msstate.edu

Volume 12, Number 1
Fall 1995

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ABSTRACTS OF ARTICLES
THE JOURNAL OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
VOLUME 12, NUMBER 1

A REFEREED JOURNAL

PUBLISHED BY OMICRON TAU THETA

THE NATIONAL PROFESSIONAL HONORARY SOCIETY

FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

ENCOURAGING EMPLOYER INVOLVEMENT IN YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP

AND OTHER WORK-BASED LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

by

Christine D. Bremer

Honeywell Inc.

and

Svjetlana Madzar

University of Minnesota

Abstract

Young people planning to enter the workforce may derive considerable benefit from school-supervised work-based learning programs such as youth apprenticeship. While many educators recognize the value of such experience, few employers have seemed enthusiastic about becoming involved in such programs. It is proposed that employer involvement in school-to-work transition could be enhanced by innovations in both governmental and non-governmental policies and programs. It is suggested that several dimensions be kept in mind when designing incentives: type of workplace, policy level, government versus non-government, size of participating employers, motivations of business participants, and rewarding existing programs versus building paths to partnership. Policy recommendations are made regarding tax credits, federal funding through JTPA, use of labor market projections, general student assessment, involvement of national business organizations, development of school and small business coalitions, and curriculum design.

SELF-DIRECTEDNESS IN ADULT VOCATIONAL EDUCATION STUDENTS:

ITS ROLE IN LEARNING AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INSTRUCTION

by

Thomas D. Fisher

Kent State University

Abstract

This report is intended to enlighten the educator of adults about some of the essential elements of self-directedness, and more clearly define its relevance to adult learning and instruction. It endeavors to stimulate thought and dialogue regarding how the adult educator can utilize the potential of self-directedness in the classroom. By developing qualities built around adult oriented methodologies, teachers can help to enhance adult students' cognitive and affective processes. An expected student response should be the perpetuation of intellectual curiosity and development exhibited by further demonstrations of self-directedness regarding learning. Further, this report points out a potential ethical problem which could arise and identifies six issues that instructors and institutions should address if the needs of adult students are to be met. Lastly, it suggests how "Structured Flexibility" can create a mutually conducive learning environment that provides for student growth as well as instructor proficiency and professionalism.

SWOT ANALYSIS: A MANAGEMENT TOOL

FOR INITIATING NEW PROGRAMS

IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS

by

Radha Balamuralikrishna

and

John C. Dugger

Iowa State University

Abstract

The SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis has been a useful tool for industry. This article proposes the application of the SWOT tool for use as a decision-making aid as new vocational programs are planned. The process of utilizing the SWOT approach requires an internal survey of strengths and weaknesses of the program and an external survey of threats and opportunities. Structured internal and external examinations are unique in the world of curriculum planning and development. Educational examples using the SWOT analysis are provided by the authors. It is a useful way of examining current environmnetal conditions around program offerings. An insight into the wide range of the potential applications of SWOT is also an intended outcome of this paper.

PERSPECTIVES ON WORK FROM RURAL PARENTS WITH

DIFFERENT LEVELS OF EDUCATION

by

Jane D. Reagor

and

Marsha L. Rehm

Tennessee Technological University

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine: (1) work perspectives from parents with three levels of education and located in an economically and geographically disadvantaged Appalachian county and (2) how they see their role in the vocational guidance of their children. In-depth interviews were conducted with 34 respondents with varying educational attainments. These were content analyzed to see if differences existed. Respondents with high school educations or less held unfavorable views about work, considering it hard and tiring. Parents with some college or vocational training voiced more positive views, considering work rewarding and self-fulfilling. However, all parents were concerned about their children's careers and most expressed concern that they could not guide their youth into appropriate vocations without help from schools.

TEACHER PREPARATION FOR DIVERSITY: A NATIONAL

STUDY OF CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

by

Karen H. Jones

and

Rhonda S. Black

The University of Georgia

Abstract

This study examines state certification requirements for regular and vocational teachers regarding students with disabilities, disadvantages, and multicultural backgrounds. Certification offices of the Department of Education of every state and the District of Columbia responded. In addition, the perceptions of State Vocational Special Needs Supervisors toward these certification requirements, and their states' methods of support for vocational teachers are reported. Discussion and conclusions are presented.


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