Title page for ETD etd-05132008-110653


Type of Document Dissertation
Author Lozano, Brian Edward
Author's Email Address blozano@vt.edu
URN etd-05132008-110653
Title Comparison of Participatively-set and Assigned Goals in the Reduction of Alcohol Use
Degree PhD
Department Psychology
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Stephens, Robert S. Committee Chair
Clum, George A. Jr. Committee Member
Cooper, Lee D. Committee Member
Hauenstein, Neil M. A. Committee Member
Keywords
  • college drinking
  • alcohol
  • social cognitive theory
  • goal setting
Date of Defense 2008-04-29
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
The effects of setting goals on goal commitment and goal achievement in the context of an alcohol use intervention were examined using an experimental design in which participants were randomly assigned to participatively-set goals, assigned goals, and no goal conditions. The current study provides information regarding the links between degree of participation in goal setting, goal commitment, self-efficacy for one’s goal, subsequent alcohol use, and goal achievement. It was hypothesized that: 1) Goal setting and participation in goal setting would significantly predict alcohol use outcomes: a) having a goal for alcohol consumption would cause lower quantity and frequency of alcohol use relative to not having a goal; b) participation in goal setting, rather than being assigned a goal, would influence goal achievement such that participation in goal setting would cause greater success in achieving one’s goal. 2) Participation in goal setting would influence goal commitment such that participation in goal setting would cause greater goal commitment. 3) Goal commitment would influence goal achievement such that greater goal commitment would be predictive of greater success in achieving one’s goal. 4) The facilitative effect of participation in goal setting on subsequent goal achievement would be mediated by goal commitment. 5) Self-efficacy for one’s goal would influence goal achievement such that greater self-efficacy for one’s goal would be predictive of greater success in achieving one’s goal.

One hundred and twenty-six binge-drinking college students received a single cognitive-behavioral assessment/intervention session and completed measures of goal commitment, self-efficacy for goal achievement, and alcohol use. Results were consistent with, and expanded upon, previous research by demonstrating that having a goal for alcohol consumption was predictive of lower quantity and frequency of alcohol use relative to not having a goal; however, participation in goal setting did not result in significantly better alcohol use outcomes or greater goal achievement relative to when goals were assigned. Participation in goal setting yielded greater goal commitment and self-efficacy for goal achievement than assigned goals. Lastly, goal commitment and self-efficacy contributed unique variance to the prediction of goal achievement across follow-up as well as changes in quantity and frequency of alcohol use at follow-up after controlling for baseline use.

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