Title page for ETD etd-07042009-010717


Type of Document Dissertation
Author Kim, Dong Kwan
Author's Email Address ikek70@vt.edu
URN etd-07042009-010717
Title Applying Dynamic Software Updates to Computationally-Intensive Applications
Degree PhD
Department Computer Science
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Tilevich, Eli Committee Chair
Arthur, James D. Committee Member
Bohner, Shawn A. Committee Member
Fisher, Marc II Committee Member
Gracanin, Denis Committee Member
Park, Jung-Min Jerry Committee Member
Ribbens, Calvin J. Committee Member
Keywords
  • Proxy Pattern
  • Java Virtual Machine
  • Binary Rewriting
  • HPC
  • Dynamic Software Updates
  • Computationally-Intensive Applications
Date of Defense 2009-06-22
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
Dynamic software updates change the code of a computer program while it runs,

thus saving the programmer’s time and using computing resources more productively.

This dissertation establishes the value of and recommends practices for applying dynamic software

updates to computationally-intensive applications—a computing domain characterized

by long-running computations, expensive computing resources, and a tedious deployment

process. This dissertation argues that updating computationally-intensive applications dynamically

can reduce their time-to-discovery metrics—the total time it takes from posing

a problem to arriving at a solution—and, as such, should become an intrinsic part of their

software lifecycle. To support this claim, this dissertation presents the following technical

contributions: (1) a distributed consistency algorithm for synchronizing dynamic software

updates in a parallel HPC application, (2) an implementation of the Proxy design pattern

that is more efficient than the existing implementations, and (3) a dynamic update approach

for Java Virtual Machine (JVM)-based applications using the Proxy pattern to offer flexibility

and efficiency advantages, making it suitable for computationally-intensive applications.

The contributions of this dissertation are validated through performance benchmarks and

case studies involving computationally-intensive applications from the bioinformatics and

molecular dynamics simulation domains.

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