Title page for ETD etd-11242009-020129


Type of Document Master's Thesis
Author Groeschl, David A.
URN etd-11242009-020129
Title Forest soil and vegetation characteristics in two forest types following wildfire in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
Degree Master of Science
Department Forestry
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Johnson, James E. Committee Chair
Scrivani, John A. Committee Member
Smith, David William Committee Member
Keywords
  • Wildfires
Date of Defense 1991-01-05
Availability restricted
Abstract

A wildfire of variable intensity occurred in mid-July of 1988 in the Shenandoah National Park and adjacent private lands. This study was established to measure post-fire forest soil and vegetation characteristics in both the mixed pine and mixed oak forest types occurring on Dovel Mountain in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Vegetation and soil results represent one (1989) and two (1990) growing seasons following fire occurrence in the mixed pine forest type, whereas only second year results are reported for the mixed oak forest type.

Forest floor and mineral soil parameters differed among burn levels and followed similar trends for both forest types. Forest floor depth and weight were significantly less on low and high burn areas as compared to unburned areas. Low intensity fires removed the Oi-Oe layer while leaving the Oa layer relatively intact. Conversely, high intensity fifes resulted in the consumption of the entire forest floor. Total carbon, nitrogen, and nutrient differences between low and unburned areas for the entire forest floor (Oi-Oe + Oa) were negligible. However, loss of these constituents were much greater following high intensity fifes. Differences in the surface 10 cm of mineral soil were also detected following following high intensity fifes. Differences in the sulface 10 cm of mineral soil were also detected following low and high intensity fires. Mineral soil acidity was lower while exchangeable cation concentrations were higher in burned areas compared to unburned areas. Total carbon and nitrogen levels were higher in low burn areas, whereas total carbon and nitrogen levels were lower on high bum areas. Inorganic nitrogen levels were higher in both low and high burn areas compared to unburned areas.

Files
  Filename       Size       Approximate Download Time (Hours:Minutes:Seconds) 
 
 28.8 Modem   56K Modem   ISDN (64 Kb)   ISDN (128 Kb)   Higher-speed Access 
[VT] LD5655.V855_1991.G764.pdf 6.83 Mb 00:31:37 00:16:16 00:14:14 00:07:07 00:00:36
[BTD] next to an author's name indicates that all files or directories associated with their ETD are accessible from the Virginia Tech campus network only.

Browse All Available ETDs by ( Author | Department )

dla home
etds imagebase journals news ereserve special collections
virgnia tech home contact dla university libraries

If you have questions or technical problems, please Contact DLA.