Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Suresh Ramachandran
Email address:sramacha@hotmail.com
URN:1997/00494
Title:ANALYSIS OF FREEWAY WEAVING AREAS USING CORRIDOR SIMULATOR AND HIGHWAY CAPACITY MANUAL
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Civil Engineering
Committee Chair: Dr. Antoine G. Hobeika
Chair's email:hobeika@vt.edu
Committee Members:Dr. Henry Lieu
Dr. Antonio A. Trani
Keywords:CORSIM, HCM, Simulation, Evaluation, Calibration
Date of defense:December 1 1997
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

Weaving is defined as the crossing of two or more traffic streams traveling in the same direction along a significant length of the highway without the aid of traffic control devices . The traditional methods used for design and operational analysis of a highway is the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM). The traditional weaving methods in the highway capacity manual use road geometry and traffic volume as inputs and provide an estimate of speed as an output. CORSIM is a new computer simulation model developed by Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) for simulation of traffic behavior on integrated urban transportation networks of freeway and surface streets. The intent of this research is to identify the difference in the results by using the new CORSIM simulation and the traditional HCM approach in modeling the weaving sections on a freeway and make recommendations. The research will also compare the modeling strategy and provide analysis of the output.

List of Attached Files

Abstract.pdf acknow.pdf appendix.pdf
bibl.pdf chp1.pdf chp2.pdf
chp3.pdf chp4.pdf chp5.pdf
chp6.pdf tableofcont.pdf title.pdf
vita.pdf

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