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    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Muluken Tilahun
Email address:mtilahun@vt.edu
URN:1998/00074
Title:Experimental Investigation of Hyperbolic Heat Transfer in Heterogeneous Materials
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Mechanical Engineering
Committee Chair: Elaine P. Scott
Chair's email:scottep@vt.edu
Committee Members:Brian Vick
Mark S. Cramer
Keywords:Parameter Estimation, Nonhomogeneous, Thermal Properties
Date of defense:January 20, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

In previous studies, evidence of thermal wave behavior was found in heterogeneous materials. Thus, the overall goal of this study was to experimentally verify those results, and develop a parameter estimation scheme to estimate the thermal properties of various heterogeneous materials. Two types of experiments (Experiments 1 and 2) were conducted to verify the existence or non-existence of thermal wave behavior in heterogeneous materials. In Experiment 1 sand, ion exchanger, and sodium bicarbonate were used as test materials, while processed meat (bologna) was used in Experiment 2. The measured temperature profiles of the samples were compared with the parabolic and hyperbolic heat conduction model results. The values of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were obtained using the Box-Kanemasu parameter estimation method which is based on the comparison between temperature measurements and the solutions of the theoretical model. Overall, no clear experimental evidence was found to justify the use of hyperbolic heat conduction models rather than parabolic for the materials tested. Further comprehensive experimentation using different heating rates is warranted to definitely identify the accurate type of heat conduction process associated with such materials, and to describe the physical mechanisms which produce wave-like heat conduction in heterogeneous materials.

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