Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Patricia Anne Seay
Email address:pseay@vt.edu
URN:1998/00299
Title:Finite Element Analysis of Geotextile Tubes
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Civil Engineering
Committee Chair: Raymond H. Plaut
Chair's email:rplaut@vt.edu
Committee Members:Siegfried M. Holzer
Kamal B. Rojiani
Keywords:geotextile tubes, finite element analysis, sandbag, flood control, dike
Date of defense:April 9, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

The three-dimensional behavior of geotextile tubes is studied using finite element modeling. Two initial shapes are investigated, one with a flat length-to-width ratio of 2:1 and the other with a flat length-to-width ratio of 5:1. The tubes are modeled resting on elastic foundations. For each initial shape, the elastic foundation is modeled using two different stiffnesses; one allows a minimum amount of "sinking" into the foundation and the other allows a considerable amount. The weight of the geotextile is included. Hydrostatic pressure is applied internally to each initially flat tube to model the pumped slurry. The shape of the tube is studied along with the contact region between the tube and its foundation, the stresses which develop in the geotextile along the planes of symmetry, and the relationship between the height of the tube and the amount of applied hydrostatic pressure.

List of Attached Files

SEAYVITAETD11.PDF etd1.pdf etd10.pdf
etd2.pdf etd3.pdf etd4.pdf
etd5.pdf etd6.pdf etd7.pdf
etd8.pdf etd9.pdf

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