Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Malathi Ananthakrishnan
Email address:malathi@vt.edu
URN:1998/00333
Title:The Urban Social Patterns of Navi Mumbai, India
Degree:Master of Urban and Regional Planning
Department:Urban Affairs and Planning
Committee Chair: Dr. J. O. Browder
Chair's email:browder@vt.edu
Committee Members:Dr. W. Jacobson
Dr. P. Knox
Keywords:urban social pattern, Navi Mumbai, Bombay, urban planning - India
Date of defense:April 6, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

This research thesis examines the emerging trends in urban social patterns in Navi Mumbai, India. Unlike the other planned cities of India, Navi Mumbai was specifically built as a planned decentralization of a large metropolitan city. The research focuses on explaining the urban social pattern of this particular case study. An urban social pattern reflects the social characteristics of the urban setting. In the case of Navi Mumbai, the government had a social agenda of promoting a social pattern based on socioeconomic distribution rather than an ethnic one. Analysis of the data provides an insight to the results of this social agenda, and provides a basis to frame new ones. Thus, the study not only addresses a basic research question, but also has policy implications. The research involves a comprehensive review of secondary source material to establish the theoretical framework for the research. The review also involves an extensive inspection of urban social patterns across the world to better contextualize this particular case study. The research puts forth a model that explains the social pattern of Navi Mumbai by social area analysis using variables, which are drawn from social aspects of any city and indigenous factors of Indian settlements. The model depends not only on statistical analysis but also on interpretation of local conditions. This research situates the emerging social pattern in geographic literature in developing countries. This research was supported in part, by a grant from the College of Architecture and Urban Studies, Virginia Tech.

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