Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Dissertation
Name:Kenneth C. Baile
Email address:kbaile@nswc.navy.mil
URN:1998/00515
Title:A STUDY OF STRATEGIC PLANNING IN FEDERAL ORGANIZATIONS
Degree:Doctor of Philosophy
Department:Public Administration and Policy
Committee Chair: John W. Dickey
Chair's email:jdickey@vt.edu
Committee Members:John W. Dickey, Chair
James E. Colvard
James R. Pollard
Larkin Dudley
James F. Wolf
Keywords:Public Organizations, Strategic Planning, Federal Agencies
Date of defense:April 27, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

This dissertation explores strategic planning in federal agencies. The research seeks to uncover difficulties federal agencies experience when making strategic plans, to explore the relationship between these difficulties and the degree of publicness of the agencies, and to uncover and describe techniques used by federal agencies to overcome difficulties. The research is important because strategic planning has gained renewed interest in federal government organizations stimulated by the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and there are few empirical studies on strategic planning based on the public character of these organizations. The results present the difficulties and techniques reported by planners in eighteen separate federal agencies and show a relationship between the degree of publicness of the agency and the difficulties encountered in strategic planning.

List of Attached Files

stratpln.PDF

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