Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Jindong Zhang
Email address:jindong@vt.edu
URN:1998/00973
Title:STUDY AND IMPROVEMENT OF SINGLE-STAGE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION TECHNIQUES
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Electrical and computer engineering
Committee Chair: Fred C. Lee
Chair's email:fclee@vt.edu
Committee Members:Dan Y. Chen
Jason Lai
Keywords:power factor correction, single-stage
Date of defense:August 6, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

This thesis work focuses on the study and improvement of single-stage power factor correction techniques. The generalized structures of the present pulse-width-modulation (PWM) integrated single-stage power factor correction (PFC) converters are presented. The typical PFC cells in the single-stage PFC converter are identified. After that, the necessary PFC condition is derived and verified to understand the principle of the single-stage PFC converters. As an example, the continuous current mode (CCM) current source single-stage PFC converter is studied. The circuit intuitions and design consideration of this converter are presented. Also, an improved current source single-stage PFC converter with a low-frequency auxiliary switch is proposed to overcome the problem of the previous converter. Experimental verification shows the improvement is effective. To evaluate single-stage PFC technique, a comparison study between the current source single-stage and the boost two-stage PFC converters is done in this thesis. It shows that for universal line application, due to the wide bus-capacitor voltage range, single-stage PFC converters have higher component ratings than two-stage PFC converters. This limits the application of single-stage PFC converter. Therefore, an interesting future work will be how to reduce the bus voltage range of single-stage PFC converters.

List of Attached Files

ABSTRACT.PDF ACKNOWLEDGMENT.PDF CHAP1.PDF
CHAP2.PDF CHAP3.PDF CHAP4.PDF
CHAP5.PDF CONTENTS.PDF ILLUSE-FIGS.PDF
REF.PDF TITLE1.PDF VITA.PDF

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