Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Dissertation
Name:Virginia Woods Gerde
Email address:vgerde@vt.edu
URN:1998/00874
Title:THE DESIGN DIMENSIONS OF THE JUST ORGANIZATION: AN EMPIRICAL TEST OF THE RELATION BETWEEN ORGANIZATION DESIGN AND CORPORATE SOCIAL PERFORMANCE
Degree:Doctor of Philosophy
Department:Management
Committee Chair: Richard E. Wokutch
Chair's email:wokutch@vt.edu
Committee Members:Carroll Underwood Stephens, Co-Chair
Jon M. Shepard, Department Head
Larry Killough
James W. Bishop
Keywords:organization design, corporate social performance, wertrational
Date of defense:June 30, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

Although organization design to bring about corporate social performance (CSP) is a critical issue in the business and society field, little research has been conducted. This study is an empirical test of the general model of the just organization presented by Stephens and colleagues (1991; Stephens, et al., 1997). The theoretical development describes organizational design principles from John Rawls’ (1971) Theory of Justice, chosen for its emphasis on economic organizations and structure, its emphasis on efficiency as well as justice, and its affinity with Max Weber’s wertrational (or value rationality) social action category from Economy and Society (1978/1910). From the general model of the just organization and characteristic organizational design features (structural and processual) consistent with the general model, an ideal type of just organization is developed. The primary hypothesis is that the more an organization emulates the ideal type of the just organization, the better its social performance will be as measured by higher CSP ratings. The degree of similarity of design with the ideal-type profile of the just organization is measured by the Euclidean distance, or summary distance metric, of the sample organization’s profile to the ideal-type profile. The methodology utilizes surveys of corporations for organizational design features and the CSP ratings from the Kinder, Lydenberg, and Domini, Inc., social ratings database. The results indicate that there is no correlation between organization design and social performance when CSP is taken as an aggregate of all the stakeholder-firm relationships. However, when the specific stakeholder relationship is analyzed, there is an association between the presence of stakeholder-specific design features and higher CSP ratings along the stakeholder-specific social rating dimension.

List of Attached Files

CHAP1.PDF CHAP2.PDF CHAP3.PDF
CHAP4.PDF CHAP5.PDF ETD.PDF
FINAPP1.PDF FINAPP2.PDF FINAPP3.PDF
REFERENC.PDF VITA.PDF

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