Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Muhannad Hasan Ramahi
Email address:mramahi@vt.edu
URN:1998/01096
Title:RESIDENT SCHEDULING PROBLEM
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Industrial and Systems Engineering
Committee Chair: Dr. Hanif D. Sherali
Chair's email:hanifs@vt.edu
Committee Members:Dr. Subhash C. Sarin
Dr. John E. Kobza
Keywords:mathematical programming, network flow problem, MIP
Date of defense:September 25, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work for Virginia Tech access only.
After one year release worldwide only with written permission of the student and the advisory committee chair.

Abstract:

This thesis is concerned with the Resident Scheduling Problem (RSP) in which a good schedule is desired that will meet both departmental requirements and residentsí preferences. Three scenarios that represent most situations and account for various departmental requirements and needs are described. Although similar scheduling problems are considered in the literature, no analysis exists that adequately deals with this specific problem. The problem is modeled as a mixed-integer program (MIP) and heuristic solution procedures are developed for the different identified scheduling scenarios. These procedures exploit the network structure of the problem which is an important feature that enhances problem solvability. For the sake of comparison, the problem is also solved exactly via the CPLEX-MIP package. The contribution of this work is important since many hospitals are still utilizing manual techniques in preparing their own schedules, expending considerable effort and time with less scheduling flexibility.

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