Gateroad Design in Overlying Multi-Seam Mines

by

JunLu Luo

Master's Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Virginia Tech in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Master of Science

in

Mining and Minerals Engineering

Approved

Dr. Christopher Haycocks

May 2nd, 1997
Blacksburg, Virginia

Abstract

GATEROAD DESIGN IN
OVERLYING MULTI-SEAM MINES



JunLu Luo

Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, Virginia, USA 24061


ABSTRACT


There are two major design problems for upper seam longwall gateroads operating in a multi-seam environment. The first is to determine the location, magnitude and duration of stress transferred from lower seam mines; and the second is to predict the effect of stress transferred from lower seam mines on opening stability. To solve these problems for both longwall and room-and-pillar mines, case study data were collected and analyzed to develop empirical models predicting upper seam damage created by mining activities in the lower seam. Analysis showed vertical movement in the upper seam and roof CMRR (Coal Mine Roof Rating) to be the controlling factors in damage prediction and, therefore, gateroad planning and design. The relationship between the predicted damage rating and the gateroad stability was established and quantified. To simplify the application of design procedures developed for longwall gateroad systems, the criteria were incorporated in a Windows-based, multi-interface software , UGLY (Upperseam Gateroad Longwall Stability). The programming language was Visual Basic, and the programís design capabilities were validated and demonstrated using case study data.

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