Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Dissertation
Name:Cheryl L. H. Atkinson
Email address:gallup@vt.edu
URN:1998/00341
Title:AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF "SUCCESS FOR ALL" ON READING, ATTENDANCE, AND ACADEMIC SELF-EFFICACY WITH AT-RISK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS
Degree:Doctor of Education
Department:Educational Leadership & Policy Studies
Committee Chair: Robert R. Richards
Chair's email:robertr@vt.edu
Committee Members:Mary E. Yakimowski, Co-Chair.
Christina M. Dawson
Diane N. Gillespie
Stephen R. Parson
Keywords:Reading, Title I, Efficacy, At-risk
Date of defense:March 23, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work immediately worldwide.

Abstract:

The purpose of this quantitative/qualitative evaluation study was to analyze the impact of the Success for All (SFA) program on reading achievement, attendance, and academic self-efficacy. Robert Slavin (1996) and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University developed the Success for All program, which incorporates a comprehensive school restructuring approach. This program focuses on improving achievement of at-risk children and aims to have every child reading on or above grade level by grade three (Slavin, 1996). Two urban, schoolwide Title I elementary schools were compared using a non-equivalent matched group, evaluation design. Stanford 9 reading comprehension scores and attendance data were analyzed through an Analysis of Variance. Results yielded positive effects for group membership (SFA, non-SFA) in reading achievement and reading self-efficacy with mean scores of 58.6 NCEs vs 33.6 NCEs and 86.6 vs 68.7 respectively. Focus group results showed strong parental and staff support for the program. Implications are presented along with suggested future avenues of research such as the SFA program's impact over time and the investigation of the program's impact on other measures of achievement.

List of Attached Files

DIS2.PDF DIS3.PDF PAPERWHO.PDF
TABLES1A.PDF


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