Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Wei Zhang
Email address:w-zhang3@ti.com
URN:1998/00556
Title:Integrated EMI/Thermal Design for Switching Power Supplies
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Electrical Engineering
Committee Chair: Fred C. Lee, Dan Y. Chen
Chair's email:fclee2@vpec.vt.edu, chen@vt.edu
Committee Members:Fred C. Lee
Dan Y. Chen
Dushan Borojevich
Keywords:switching power supplies, EMI, thermal
Date of defense:Feburary 9, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work immediately worldwide.

Abstract:

This work presents the modeling and analysis of EMI and thermal performance for switch power supply by using the CAD tools. The methodology and design guidelines are developed. By using a boost PFC circuit as an example, an equivalent circuit model is built for EMI noise prediction and analysis. The parasitic elements of circuit layout and components are extracted analytically or by using CAD tools. Based on the model, circuit layout and magnetic component design are modified to minimize circuit EMI. EMI filter can be designed at an early stage without prototype implementation. In the second part, thermal analyses are conducted for the circuit by using the software Flotherm, which includes the mechanism of conduction, convection and radiation. Thermal models are built for the components. Thermal performance of the circuit and the temperature profile of components are predicted. Improved thermal management and winding arrangement are investigated to reduce temperature. In the third part, several circuit layouts and inductor design examples are checked from both the EMI and thermal point of view. Insightful information is obtained.

List of Attached Files

ethesis2.pdf


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