Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Dissertation
Name:Alan Barry Nason
Email address:anason@titan.com
URN:1998/00679
Title:Motivation of managers assigned to a Federal agency towards participation in government-sponsored training
Degree:Doctor of Education
Department:Adult and Continuing Education
Committee Chair: Albert Wiswell
Chair's email:wiswell@vt.edu
Committee Members:Harold Stubblefield
Marcie Boucouvalas
Thomas Reio
Melissa Howard
Keywords:adult education, training, participation, managers, government agency
Date of defense:May 22, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work immediately worldwide.

Abstract:

MOTIVATION OF MANAGERS ASSIGNED TO A FEDERAL AGENCY TOWARDS PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED TRAINING Alan B. Nason (ABSTRACT) This study examined the motivations of managers in a Federal government agency to participate or not participate in voluntary government-sponsored training. The researcher distributed a questionnaire, via agency electronic mail, to managers and supervisors in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The questionnaire comprised items selected from three instruments used and validated in previous adult education participation studies and provided the data for this study. Section 1 of the questionnaire addressed demographics, Section 2 addressed non-participation, and Section 3 addressed participation. Respondents rated the degree of influence or importance each item had on their decision to participate or not to participate in government-sponsored training. The data revealed the relative importance of the reasons for participation and non-participation and their relationship to the demographic variables. Cognitive interest and professional advancement were the primary motivations for participation in training. Lack of course relevance and time constraints were the primary motivations for not participating in training. There was no significant difference in motivation between men and women managers for either participation or non-participation. Other demographic variables had low to mid-range correlations with specific reasons for participation and non-participation, none of which were concentrated on a single cluster or factor.

List of Attached Files

DISSERTA.PDF


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