Scholarly Communications Project


PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF DECT IN DIFFERENT RADIO ENVIRONMENTS

by

Kevin J. Saldanha

Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

M.S.

Approved

Dr. J. H. Reed, Chair
Dr. T. S. Rappaport
Dr. B. D. Woerner

August 05, 1996
Blacksburg, Virginia


Abstract

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF DECT
IN DIFFERENT RADIO ENVIRONMENTS
by
Kevin J. Saldanha
Committee Chairman: Dr. J. H. Reed
Electrical Engineering

Abstract

DECT is a cordless telephone standard whose applications are broadening with the advent of PCS services, wireless local loop (WLL), and the increasing demand for high data-rate wireless local area networks (WLANs).

This thesis investigates the performance of DECT in different channel conditions. DECT is simulated using the Signal Processing WorkSystem (SPW) software in different channels including the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, the flat faded Rayleigh channel, the frequency selective faded Rayleigh channel, and the Ricean channel. The effect of cochannel and adjacent channel interference is also investigated.

In order to quantify the RF channel dispersive properties, and other parameters that determine performance in a radio channel, channel impulse response measurements at 1.9 GHz are made. Parameters that help describe the radio channel are identified and calculated from the recorded power delay profile measurements.

Finally, a mean-opinion-score (MOS) rating was performed for National Semiconductor Corporation's implementation of DECT in the indoor, indoor-to- outdoor, and outdoor environments. A comparison is made between the MOS and propagation measurements. It is found that the performance of DECT is very closely related to the RMS delay spread and the path loss in the RF channel.

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