Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Master's Thesis
Name:Todd Alan Peterson
Email address:peterson@andassoc.com
URN:1997/00306
Title:AQM Shell Development - Creating a Framework for Airspace and Airfield Operations and Air Quality Visualization Software
Degree:Master of Science
Department:Civil Engineering
Committee Chair: Dr. Antonio A. Trani
Chair's email:vuela@vt.edu
Committee Members:Dr. Donald R. Drew
Dr. Antoine G. Hobeika
Keywords:airports, air traffic, air pollution, SIMMOD, visualization
Date of defense:September 22, 1997
Availability:Release the entire work immediately worldwide.

Abstract:

It is believed that the analysis of air traffic impacts on air quality will benefit from attention to the three-dimensional nature of the air traffic network as well as the actions of individual aircraft during the study period. With the existence of air traffic simulation models, the actions of individual aircraft may already be defined in a simulated environment. SIMMOD, the Federal Aviation Administration's airport and airspace modeling software, performs such models of scheduled air traffic. The results of such models may be used to determine the impacts of scheduled air traffic on air quality as well as other parameters. This report addresses the interpretation of output from SIMMOD models for use in air quality analysis and visualization of the air traffic network, and the application of these techniques in a stand-alone computer program. This program, named AQM for its purpose in assisting development of Air Quality Models, provides a working framework for future development of software for detailed air quality analysis and visualization.

List of Attached Files

AQM_Shell_Development.PDF


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