Scholarly
    Communications Project


Document Type:Dissertation
Name:Siriwan Kittinaovarut
Email address:siriwan@vt.edu
URN:1998/01144
Title:POLYMERIZATION-CROSSLINKING FABRIC FINISHING, WITH PAD-DRY-CURE, USING NONFORMALDEHYDE BTCA/IA/AA COMBINATIONS TO IMPART DURABLE PRESS PROPERTIES IN COTTON FABRIC.
Degree:Doctor of Philosophy in Clothing and Textiles
Department:Near Environments
Committee Chair: M.T. Norton
Chair's email:nortonm@vt.edu
Committee Members:D.H. Kincade
K.R. Shelton
A.M. Dietrich
M.L. McGilliard
J.M. Tanko
Keywords:nonformaldehyde, wrinkling, polymerization-crosslinking
Date of defense:September 15, 1998
Availability:Release the entire work immediately worldwide.

Abstract:

This study examined the mechanical and durable press properties of cotton 3/1 twill-woven fabrics finished with various concentrations of reactants in the BTCA/IA/AA combinations. The regression analysis was used to determine the relationship among each finishing variable, BTCA, IA, and AA concentrations, mole ratio of acid monomers to the sodium hypophosphite monohydrate catalyst, and curing times at 180C, and the finished fabric's property variable, breaking strength, tear strength, wrinkle recovery angle whiteness index, and durable press rating. Based on the results of the reduced regression equations and range dispersion of mean values of finished fabric properties. The results of the study indicated the some BTCA/IA/AA combinations applied to cotton fabric provided good results in wrinkle recovery angle, breaking strength, and tear strength, comparable to those of the fabric finished with either BTCA only or DMDHEU reactant. The combinations of BTCA/IA/AA reactants did not provide as good whiteness index and durable press rating as the BTCA or DMDHEU reactant.

List of Attached Files

ABSTRACT.PDF CONTENT.PDF DP.PDF


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