The Alan Review
Current Editor
Wendy Glenn wendy.glenn@uconn.edu
Volume 38, Number 3
Summer 2011


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Call for Manuscripts

Submitting a Manuscript:

Manuscript submission guidelines are available on p. 2 of this issue and on our website at http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/.

Summer 2012 Theme: Exploring Identity and Identities in Young Adult Literature

James Baldwin argues that all “roles are dangerous” and that the “world tends to trap you in the role you play.” Too often, teens feel trapped by the role they think they must play. The theme of this issue asks us to consider the influences and intersections of race, class, gender, culture, and sexual identity in young adult literature. What roles do adolescents feel trapped in or empowered by? How are issues of race, class, gender, culture, and sexual identity explored or challenged in YAL? Who is silenced or marginalized by an aspect of their identity? Which novels help students explore or try on different identities? This theme is meant to be open to interpretation, and we welcome manuscripts addressing pedagogy as well as theoretical concerns. General submissions are also welcome. Submission deadline: November 1, 2011.

Fall 2012 Theme: Poetry and Young Adult Literature

Billy Collins says that he wants to “walk inside the poem’s room.” Marianne Moore wants “imaginary gardens with real toads in them.” Poetry in all its varied forms is used in a myriad of ways in young adult literature. Some authors (Karen Hesse, Ellen Hopkins, Virginia Euwer Wolff, Mel Glenn) create novels in verse, while other authors (Jacqueline Woodson, Nikki Grimes, Sharon Flake) weave poetry into their prose. Still others write collections of poems for adolescents (Gary Soto, Rita Dove, Paul Janeczko). Adolescent readers can take many, many paths to poetry in YAL. The theme for this issue invites us to consider the ways in which we can walk inside a poem’s room or find that imaginary garden with adolescents. What is it about poetry that grabs adolescent readers? Many young adult authors are experimenting with the ways in which they use poetry to tell their stories; how does this help adolescent readers and writers? How does the way in which authors use poetry to tell complex narratives push adolescents to be stronger readers? This theme is meant to be open to interpretation, and we welcome manuscripts addressing pedagogy as well as theoretical concerns. General submissions are also welcome. Submission Deadline: March 1, 2012.

Stories from the Field

Editors’ Note: Stories from the Field invites readers to share a story about young adult literature. This section features brief vignettes (approximately 300 words) from practicing teachers and librarians who would like to share their interactions with students, parents, colleagues, and administrators around young adult literature. Please send your stories to: jbach@lsu.edu.

ALAN Foundation Research Grants

Members of ALAN may apply to the ALAN Foundation for funding (up to $1,500) for research in young adult literature. Proposals are reviewed by the five most recent presidents of ALAN. Awards are made annually in the fall and are announced at the ALAN breakfast during the NCTE convention in November. The application deadline each year is September 15th.


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