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Volume 21, Number 2 Fall, 1994

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WORKSHOP--RECRUITMENT AND FUNDING

Discussion Leader: Jack H. Britt, PhD
Rapporteur: Michael W. Riggs, DVM, PhD


Introduction

Recruiting high-quality graduate students and providing adequate support for research are 2 key elements for successful postgraduate programs in colleges of veterinary medicine. This workshop was charged with identifying key issues in these 2 areas and with developing solutions to deal with these concerns. Through consensus, the workshop participants ranked the 5 most important issues in recruitment and in funding and offered solutions that could be used by most colleges of veterinary medicine. This summary lists the problems or issues in order of importance, as assessed by the participants, and describes solutions recommended by the workshop. The solutions are understood to be the task of college faculty and administrators in concert with the profession at large, including the AAVMC and the AVMA. Also some proposed solutions are relevant to more than one issue or problem and may be repeated.

Dr. Britt presented data from a survey of 10 veterinary colleges which provides information on stipends for graduate students. Included is information for both BS and DVM graduates as shown in Table 1 appended to the report of this workshop.

Recruitment

Need to develop and promote well-defined, high quality programs which have a critical mass of faculty and students

Identify and recruit a high quality student body locally, regionally, nationally and internationally, with a significant minority student and female constituency

Identify and attract preveterinary students, matriculating veterinary students and veterinarians in private practice into graduate programs

Enhance the image of veterinarians as biomedical researchers

Funding

Narrower funding opportunities and less funding in general; especially for companion animals and horses

Veterinary faculty believe that they are at a competitive disadvantage because of time-consuming demands in clinical service and teaching, lack of grant- writing skills, and lack of a critical mass (faculty, staff, students) in many programmatic areas

Lack of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary efforts to permit highest rate of success in research and competitive funding

High stipend level for DVM students and distribution of stipend funds among DVM and non-DVM students

Inaccurate perceptions of veterinary faculty by federal funding agencies (especially NIH) and vice versa, and low rates of success in competitive grants

Table 1. Stipend data for graduate trainees


		   BS seeking MS	 BS or MS seeking PhD	  DVM seeking PhD 
Univer-	Year 	Yr1	Yr2	Yr3	Yr1	Yr2	Yr3	Yr1	Yr2	Yr3		
sity	of Data
1	92-93	11,000	13,000	15,000	15,000	17,000	19,000	20,000	22,000	24,000

2	93-94	 9,978	 9,978	NA	11,460	11,460	11,460	19,496	21,852	23,026 

3	93-94	12,000	12,000	NA	12,000	12,000	12,000	21,700	22,200	22,700	 

4	93-94	13,475	13,680	13,887	13,475	13,680	13,887	19,292	20,683	21,131

5	93-94	11,694	12,045	12,406	12,617	12,996	13,386	19,769	20,362	20,973

6	92-93	10,528	10,528	10,528	10,528	10,528	10,528	20,500	20,500	20,500

7	93-94	8,600	8,858	9,124	10,400	10,712	11,033	19,250	19,750	20,250

8	93-94	10,598	10,916	11,243	11,475	11,819	12,174	18,972	19,541	20,127

9	93-94	9,631	9,917	NA	10,843	11,152	11,448	16,406	16,837	17,284

10	93-94	9,762	10,336	11,000	9,672	10,336	11,000	12,000	13,000	14,000

Summary 

	No. obs	10	10	7	10	10	10	10	10	10 
	Average	10,272	11,126	11,884	11,747	12,168	12,592	18,739	19,673	20,399 
	Median	10,563	10,722	11,243	11,468	11,640	11,730	19,394	20,431	20,737 
	Minimum	8,600	8,858	9,124	9,672	10,336	10,528	12,000	13,000	14,000 
	Maximum	13,475	13,680	15,000	15,000	17,000	19,000	21,700	22,200	24,000	
	Std.Dev.1,393	1,513	2,027	1,598	 2,005	 2,488	2,720	2,815	2,921	
*Survey of:  Texas A&M, Ohio State, Georgia, Tennessee, Minnesota, Florida,
Cornell, Colorado, North Carolina State, and Univ. of California-Davis.  The
list above is sorted from highest to lowest at the 3rd year DVM seeking PhD and
therefore is not alphabetical.

Footnotes for Table 1

University 1: Stipends do vary accoring to funding programs.
University 2: IS tuition = $452, OS tuition = $2,653 which is "tuition waived by university from state or grants funds"
University 3: IS tuition = $854 of which $582 is paid by university or extramural funds; OS tuition = $2,270, but for qualified students, difference between IS and OS is paid by university.
University 4: DVMs seeking PhD are paid on basis of relevant experience. The base is shown. IS & OS pay same tuition.
University 5: IS tuition = $651 of which $525 is "tuition waived with state or grant unds"; OS tuition = $1,518 of which $1,446 is "tuition waived."
University 6: Faculty competing for students may offer asstships somewhat higher from extramural grants.
University 7: IS tuition =$810, OS tuition = $1,992. Non-DVM students receive increases based on university guidelines (estimated at $3 for this spreadsheet).
University 8: Tuition and fees about $1,047 per quarter. Stipends for 2nd and 3rd year within a group are based on Cost of Living (estimated at 3% for this spreadsheet)
University 9: Students holding DVM degrees are appointed at 75% reather than 50%. OS tuition is waived for student on competitive stipends. Graduate students receive fringe benefits (19 to 29% of salary).
University 10: OS tuition = $1,363 and paid by university or grant.

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