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The Women in Literature and Life Assembly
of
The National Council of Teachers of English
Editor:  Patricia Kelly kellyp@vt.edu
Volume 2
Fall 1993


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Happily Ever After

Borin' honey, I mean it was real borin'
You know. He takes me home
To meet his folks and I come
Hobblin' in on one glass shoe
Like a lame horse and he says
"Father, I have found her at last"
All kinds, honey, you work this
Street, you meet all kinds
But these people were un-bee-lievable.
No teevee. They ain't got no teevee.
Great big house like that
You'd a thunk they'd a had a teevee.
But they're out a touch, you know.
Sit around on their asses all day long
And name their son, Charming --
I kid you not, babe, that was his
Name -- Not Fred, or Stan, or Gus --
Charming -- they was dippier than he was.
Do? I changed clothes a lot for thrills
Honey, there wasn't nothin' else to do.
If I'd a wanted that, I'd a signed on
At Madame Rosa's or one of them
Fancy places up on the North Shore.
I like walkin' honey, keeps the
Old pins in shape, and a girl's
Gotta have her self respect,
You know what I mean, Honey?
So I split.

by Karen Fulton


KAREN UITVLUGT FULTON is an Associate Professor of English and coordinator of the Writing Placement Examination at Missouri Western State College.


Copyright 1993, The Women in Literature and Life Assembly of the National Council of Teachers of English (ISSN #1065-9080). Permission is given to copy any article provided credit is given and the copies are not intended for resale.


Reference Citation: Fulton, Karen. (1993). Happily ever after. WILLA, Volume II, 30.


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