VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

June 1992

=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 29 May 1992 13:54:38 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Electronic Archiving of Raw Data: PSYC Call for Commentators
 
J. Skoyles on ELECTRONIC ARCHIVING AND RETRIEVAL OF RAW SCIENTIFIC DATA
 
The article below has just been published in PSYCOLOQUY. Commentary is
now invited. Commentaries should not exceed 100 lines. Each should have
a keyword-indexable title and the commentator's full name and
affiliation. Please submit commentaries to:
 
        psyc@pucc.bitnet  or  psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
psycoloquy.92.3.29.data-archive.1.skoyles           Friday   May 29 1992
ISSN 1055-0143                   (21 paragraphs, 2 references, 182 lines)
Copyright 1992 John R. Skoyles
 
        FTP INTERNET DATA ARCHIVING: A Cousin for PSYCOLOQUY
 
                John R. Skoyles
                Department of Psychology
                University College London
                WC1E 6BT, UK
                ucjtprs@ucl.ac.uk
 
   1.0  ABSTRACT: American Psychological Association (APA) journals do
   not publish raw data, hence data are effectively inaccessible. I
   propose that authors of research papers should transfer their data
   to an Internet site so it can be accessed over Internet by anonymous
   ftp. I suggest that such data archiving would (1) make fraud easier
   to detect, (2) encourage scientific criticism and (3) aid the
   scientific process in general. Nor should it be difficult to
   implement.
 
   KEYWORDS: data archiving, deception, electronic retrieval, error
             detection, ftp, fraud, meta-analysis, statistics
 
1.1  Experimental data are rarely published. Usually we are happy with
their author's own statistical treatment. But not always. Researchers
do not always fully analyse their data; sometimes editors restrict
their publication space; and sometimes we have an idea we would like to
try out on those data. It would be nice if the experimental data we read
about were easy to access. I suggest that the approaching-universal use
of computers and the Internet mail and file transfer system have made
this possible. PSYCOLOQUY is archived and easily accessed through
anonymous ftp: There is no reason why archived research data should not
be equally accessible. Though there are several potential problems with
ftp archiving of published data, the benefits would, I believe, vastly
outweigh them.
 
2.1  Here follows a case for the ftp archiving of data published in APA
(American Psychological Association) journals. I raise a few objections
and last consider how it might be implemented. Note that when I refer
to ftp this also applies to other forms of electronic data transfer.
 
3.1  First, electronic data archiving should be easy to implement and
will become increasingly so. Most researchers now (unlike, say, even
two years ago) would have little trouble archiving their data upon
publication. Most Results sections are based upon computer analyzed
ASCII data files (usually by a statistical package such as SPSS or
BMDP). Most researchers should have their raw data stored in a form
(i.e. file and subdirectory names) which makes it easy for other
researchers to use. The commands and procedures for transferring it to a
central data archive will be familiar to most psychologists (if not,
most departments have people who will help). Of course, all the details
about the research will be contained in the published paper, so these
need not be stored. Indeed, the names of journals, their volume and
issue numbers, make a convenient directory and subdirectory structure
for organising the archive. There is something self evident about what
data are contained in /JEPHPP/18/1/SMITH/EXP1. And just as it is easy
to MSEND data to an archive so it is easy to MGET them for reanalysis.
 
3.2.1  Second, the scientific ethic is to make error correction as easy
as possible. Scientists are not always entirely competent or honest.
Numerous cases of fraud and intellectual dishonesty have occurred in
psychology (as elsewhere in science). Researchers are subject to
enormous pressures to publish but unfortunately this normally requires
positive findings. This puts pressure on researchers to rerun analyses
(changing criteria for categorising data, excluding subjects, treating
missing data, etc.) when only negative findings turn up. It is not
clear how many researchers resist these pressures on the integrity of
data analysis. At present, it is difficult to check. In a recent case
reported in *Science*, two psychologists were only able to check the
data analysis of another psychologist through the intervention of
lawyers (Palca 1991).
 
3.2.2  There is public disquiet in the US Congress (notably, on the
part of Congressman John Dingell) concerning fraud and intellectual
dishonesty in science. Research on published fraudulent papers has
revealed many defects (Stewart & Feder 1987). It is likely that any
archived data would contain even more accessible and noticeable defects
(in their data distributions, treatment and analysis). Archiving data
would thus make it easier to detect both fraud and intellectual
dishonesty.
 
3.3  Third, much honestly obtained and analyzed data is incompetently
handled, yut many legitimate criticisms never arise because of
difficulties accessing data. At present, if you suspect that a
researcher's own analysis gives only part of the story or is
misleading, you face an involved process of contacting them for the
original data (something inconvenient to all concerned). Archiving data
would increase the opportunities for legitimate criticism of published
work.
 
3.4  Fourth, researchers ask different questions. Sometimes a
researcher may wish to reanalyse data to answer questions the original
authors ignored. People carrying out meta-analyses will often want to
check the quality of the work they are using. At present this is not
possible.
 
3.5  Fifth, students could gain much by examining real research papers
and then "playing around" with their data, seeing the affects of
different data-analytic strategies. They might even even find things
overlooked by their authors.
 
3.6  Sixth, much data is accidentally lost (despite APA's requirement
that authors retain their data for a number of years). An ftp archive
would make a convenient data backup.
 
3.7  Seventh, scientific papers are printed on paper -- this, not the
nature of science, is the reason data are not normally made accessible
at this time. Science is about open communication that maximally
exposes ideas and arguments to criticism (one legitimate criticism of
an idea is the way its data are handled). Printed paper is a convenient
means for opening written ideas to criticism, but it is unsuitable for
making data accessible to criticism (it limits the quantity which can
be published and communicates in a form that is inconvenient for
computer reanalysis). Print has until recently been the only means for
disseminating scientific ideas and data. Hence the tradition has arisen
of limiting the dissemination of data. We should recognise the
opportunity that electronic archives provide for breaking with this.
 
4.0  There are some reasons against ftp archiving:
 
4.1  Certain classes of data (e.g., clinical data) may have to be
excluded to preserve the confidentiality and privacy of those from whom
it is collected. This constraint does not apply to large portions of
psychology, however, such as research on animals, reaction time studies on
student subjects, or computer simulations.
 
4.2  Researchers certainly have the right to the "first go" at their
data. However, the fact of publication, unless contrary notice is
given, usually signifies that the data have already been substantially
analyzed, and frequently no further analysis is intended.
 
4.3  There is another entirely invalid objection. Many researchers
will be uncomfortable with their data being ftp archived because none
of us are perfect. If our data can be reanalyzed we may be shown to
have carried out, quite unintentionally, inappropriate or misleading
analysis. To some extent the present state of affairs is quite
convenient for hiding the fact that many researchers could be better
statisticians and could keep better records.
 
5.0  Since impracticability may be an objection, I describe how an ftp
archive might work:
 
5.1  The archive would have to be moderated by an archivist. Journal
editors, for example, could contact the archivist, who would in turn
contact the paper's chief author, providing a password and a temporary
directory into which raw data files could be transferred. Researchers
would be free to create the subdirectories they felt best organised the
data and to write a brief contents file. The archivist would transfer
the files to a permanent directory. A standard note on the front page
of the published paper would state whether its data had been archived.
 
5.2  I suggest that not only the raw data be stored but also the
statistical and data analysis programs (SPSS or BMDP; or uncomplied
Basic, Pascal or C) used to analyse them. Without these programs,
tracing the transformation of the raw data into the reported
statistical findings would be much more difficult.
 
5.3  Parallel to the archive there should be a directory for comments
by people who have accessed the data, to record their findings. Anyone
wanting to reexamine anyone's data would be interested in any previous
reanalyses, good and bad.
 
5.4  There is no reason such a data archive could not grow to
cover non-APA journals, theses, and nonpublished data (for example,
unpublished negative findings).
 
5.5  Such a system would of course involve some cost and effort,
perhaps even some inconvenience. However, with the public and
congressional concern about whether scientists are maximally ensuring
the integrity of their data, a ftp archive would show a commitment from
the psychological community to ensuring honesty in published
psychological research.
 
REFERENCES.
 
Palca, J. (1991). News and Comment: Get-the-lead-out guru challenged.
Science 253: 842-844.
 
Stewart, W. W. & Feder, N. (1987). The integrity of the scientific
literature. Nature 325: 207-214.
 
------------------------------------------------------
 
PSYCOLOQUY is a refereed electronic journal (ISSN 1044-0143) sponsored
on an experimental basis by the American Psychological Association
and currently estimated to reach a readership of 20,000. PSYCOLOQUY
publishes brief reports of ideas and findings on which the author
wishes to solicit rapid peer feedback, international and
interdisciplinary ("Scholarly Skywriting"), in all areas of psychology
and its related fields (biobehavioral, cognitive, neural, social, etc.)
All contributions are refereed by members of PSYCOLOQUY's Editorial Board.
 
Target articles should normally not exceed 500 lines in length,
commentaries and responses should not exceed 200 lines. All target
articles must have (1) a short abstract (<100 words), (2) an indexable
title, (3) 6-8 indexable keywords, and the (4) author's full name and
institutional address. The submission should be accompanied by (5) a
rationale for soliciting commentary (e.g., why would commentary be
useful and of interest to the field? what kind of commentary do you
expect to elicit?) and (6) a list of potential commentators (with their
email addresses). Commentaries must have indexable titles and the
commentator's full name and institutional address (abstract is optional).
PSYCOLOQUY also publishes reviews of books in any of the obove fields;
these should normally be the same length as commentaries, but longer
reviews will be considered as well.
 
Authors of accepted manuscripts assign to PSYCOLOQUY the right to
distribute their text electronically and to archive and make it
permanently retrievable electronically. However, they retain the
copyright, and after it has appeared in PSYCOLOQUY authors may
republish their text any way they wish -- electronic or print -- as
long as they clearly acknowledge PSYCOLOQUY as its original locus of
publication. However, except in very special cases, agreed upon in
advance, contributions that have already been published or are being
considered for publication elsewhere are not eligible to be considered
for publication in PSYCOLOQUY,
 
Please submit all material to psyc@pucc.bitnet or
psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Jun 1992 11:18:27 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Resent-From: James Powell 
Comments:     Originally-From: Jim McIntosh 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      Re: Gateway for VPIEJ-L
In-Reply-To:  Your message of Mon, 25 May 92 17:16:01 EDT
 
> I've gone ahead and set up the gateway between VPIEJ-L and a new news-
> group called bit.listserv.vpiej-l.
 
> Jim McIntosh (jim@american.edu)
> The American University
> Washington DC 20016-8019 USA
 
VPIEJ-L may now be gatewayed to Usenet
Could someone with access to a Usenet site which carries the bit.listserv
discussion groups verify the existence of bit.listserv.vpiej-l?  Thank you.
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU   (or)   JPOWELL@VTTCF.CC.VT.EDU
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Jun 1992 08:40:57 PDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Julie Kwan 
Subject:      Re: Gateway for VPIEJ-L
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon,
              1 Jun 1992 11:18:27 EDT from 
 
VPIEJ-L is now accessible via Usenet.  I may be the first to
unsubscribe.... and get it there.
 
Julie Kwan
University of Southern California
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Jun 1992 15:20:16 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         dkyburz@TECHDATA.COM
Subject:      Re: Gateway for VPIEJ-L
 
Please delete me from your mailing list as I also get news.
Thanks. Till later, Dan.
----------
Dan Kyburz, CCP, CDP, CNE | 5777 Myer Lake Cir    | ...uunet!techdata!dkyburz
Network Support Engineer  | Clearwater, FL  34620 | CIS: 70540,2061
Tech Data Corp            | dkyburz@techdata.com  | MHS: dkyburz@techdata
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Jun 1992 16:49:49 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "John M. Unsworth" 
Subject:      PMC 2.3 available
 
The sixth issue of PMC is now available, as are all back issues.  Subscription
(by e-mail) is free.
                      --John Unsworth
-----------------------------------------------------------------
POSTMODERNCULTUREPOSTMODERNCULTURE
P       RNCU   REPO   ODER       E            P O S T M O D E R N
P  TMOD RNCU  U EP S  ODER  ULTU E               C U L T U R E
P       RNCU  UR  OS  ODER  ULTURE
P  TMODERNCU  UREPOS  ODER  ULTU E          an electronic journal
P  TMODERNCU  UREPOS  ODER       E           of interdisciplinary
POSTMODERNCULTUREPOSTMODERNCULTURE                      criticism
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Volume 2, Number 3 (May, 1992)                    ISSN: 1053-1920
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
Editors:                              Eyal Amiran
                                      John Unsworth, Issue Editor
 
Book Review Editor:                   Jim English
 
Managing Editor:                      Nancy Cooke
List Manager:                         Chris Barrett
Editorial Assistant:                  Mina Javaher
 
 
Editorial Board:
 
      Kathy Acker                     Chimalum Nwankwo
      Sharon Bassett                  Patrick O'Donnell
      Michael Berube                  Elaine Orr
      Marc Chenetier                  Marjorie Perloff
      Greg Dawes                      David Porush
      R. Serge Denisoff               Mark Poster
      Robert Detweiler                Carl Raschke
      Henry Louis Gates, Jr.          Mike Reynolds
      Joe Gomez                       Avital Ronell
      Robert Hodge                    Andrew Ross
      bell hooks                      Jorge Ruffinelli
      E. Ann Kaplan                   Susan M. Schultz
      Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett   William Spanos
      Arthur Kroker                   Tony Stewart
      Neil Larsen                     Gary Lee Stonum
      Jerome J. McGann                Chris Straayer
      Stuart Moulthrop                Paul Trembath
      Larysa Mykyta                   Greg Ulmer
      Phil Novak
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
                            CONTENTS
 
AUTHOR & TITLE                                              FN FT
 
 
Masthead, Contents, Abstracts,                       CONTENTS 592
Instructions for retrieving files
 
Russell A. Potter, "Edward Schizohands:                POTTER 592
     The Postmodern Gothic Body"
 
Fred Pfeil, "Revolting Yet Conserved: Family            PFEIL 592
     %Noir% in _Blue Velvet_ and _Terminator 2_"
 
Tessa Dora Addison and Audrey Extavasia,              ADD-EXT 592
     "Fucking (With Theory) for Money: Toward
     an Interrogation of Escort Prostitution"
 
Rochelle Owens, "Drum and Whistle" and                  OWENS 592
     "Black Stems," Two Poems from _LUCA:
     Discourse on Life & Death_
 
Donald F. Theall, "Beyond the Orality/Literacy         THEALL 592
     Dichotomy: James Joyce and the Pre-History
     of Cyberspace"
 
Walter Kalaidjian, "Mainlining Postmodernism:        KALAIDJI 592
     Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, and the Art
     of Intervention"
 
Paul McCarthy, "Postmodern Pleasure and              MCCARTHY 592
     Perversity: Scientism and Sadism"
 
 
POPULAR CULTURE COLUMN:
 
Cathy Griggers, "Lesbian Bodies in the Age of        POP-CULT 592
     (Post)Mechanical Reproduction"
 
 
REVIEWS:
 
Terry Collins, "The Vietnam War, Reascendant         REVIEW-1 592
     Conservatism, White Victims," review of
     _The Vietnam War and American Culture_, ed.
     John Carlos and Rick Berg, and _Fourteen
     Landing Zones: Approaches to Vietnam War
     Literature_, ed. Philip K. Jason.
 
Michael W. Foley, review of _Post-Modernism          REVIEW-2 592
     and the Social Sciences: Insights, Inroads,
     and Intrusions_, by Pauline Marie Rosenau.
 
Ursula K. Heise, "Becoming Postmodern?"              REVIEW-3 592
     review of _Sequel to History: Postmodernism
     and the Crisis of Representational Time_, by
     Elizabeth Deeds Ermarth.
 
Edward M. Jennings, "The Text is Dead; Long          REVIEW-4 592
     Live The Techst," review of _Hypertext: The
     Convergence of Contemporary Literary Theory
     and Technology_, by George P. Landow.
 
Matthew Mancini, review of _Thinking Across          REVIEW-5 592
     the American Grain: Ideology, Intellect,
     and the New Pragmatism_, by Giles Gunn.
 
Meryl Altman and Keith Nightenhelser, review of      REVIEW-6 592
     _Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks
     to Freud_, by Thomas Laqueur.
 
Mark Poster, review of _Michel Foucault_, by         REVIEW-7 592
     Didier Eribon.
 
Linda Ray Pratt, "Speaking in Tongues: Dead          REVIEW-8 592
     Elvis and the Greil Quest," review of
     _Dead Elvis: A Chronicle of a Cultural
     Obsession_, by Greil Marcus.
 
Rei Terada, "The Pressures of Merely                 REVIEW-9 592
     Sublimating," review of _American Sublime:
     The Genealogy of a Poetic Genre_, by Rob
     Wilson.
 
 
Announcements and Advertizements                      NOTICES 592
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
                            ABSTRACTS
 
Russell A. Potter, "Edward Schizohands: The Postmodern Gothic
     Body"
 
          ABSTRACT:  In the conjunction between the gothic body
     of Edward in Tim Burton's film _Edward Scissorhands_ and the
     anti-Oedipal Body without Organs in Deleuze and Guattari's
     _Anti-Oedipus_, this essay posits a common machine, that of
     the fragmentary, persecuting Gothic body.  Whether in James
     Whale's 1931 film _Frankenstein_ or in 1991's _Body Parts_,
     the partial body appears again and again as the persecuting
     agent of a society founded upon the monolithically Oedipal
     nuclear family.  This constitution of this body, with its
     scars and sutures, is in fact fundamentally Anti-Oedipal;
     when organs do not stay in place, where is an erogenous zone
     to go?  This essay thus offers a reading not only of _Edward
     Scissorhands_ and its filmic and novelistic precursors, but
     also of the postmodern suburbanity which beings from
     Frankenstein to Edward continue to invade.  --RAP
 
 
Fred Pfeil, "Revolting Yet Conserved: Family %Noir% in _Blue
     Velvet_ and _Terminator 2_"
 
          ABSTRACT:  In the new Hollywood, quintessential site of
     the intersection between the flexible specialization of
     post-Fordist production and the free-floating
     ideologemes-turned-syntax of postmodernism, the
     transgressive energies and subversive formal practices that
     first animated and defined %film noir% may be most alive and
     well in a new and even perverse combination with other
     similarly deracinated formal and thematic elements from
     other ex- genres of film.  In contrast to classic %noir%,
     which was non- or even anti-domestic, this newer %noir%
     includes, and indeed is centered on, home and family, even
     as it decenters and problematizes both.  Through a look at
     two successful recent films, _Blue Velvet_ and _Terminator
     2_, I mean to show how home and family are being
     destabilized, "%noir%-ized" in both--dissolved into a semic
     flow or play of boundaries from which, paradoxically, those
     same categories re-emerge with renewed half-life.  --FP
 
 
Tessa Dora Addison and Audrey Extavasia, "Fucking (With Theory)
     for Money: Toward an Interrogation of Escort Prostitution"
 
          ABSTRACT:  This essay is intended as an introductory
     interrogation of the terrain of escort prostitution,
     mobilizing terms from both _The Telephone Book_ by Avital
     Ronell and _A Thousand Plateaus_ by Gilles Deleuze and Felix
     Guattari.  --TDA & AE
 
 
Donald F. Theall, "Beyond the Orality/Literacy Dichotomy: James
     Joyce and the Pre-History of Cyberspace"
 
          ABSTRACT:  _Finnegans Wake_ articulates a radical
     modernist or postmodernist theory of poetics and
     communication, based on gesture and tactility, essential to
     understanding cyberspace and the limitations of the
     orality/literacy dichotomy.  Joyce's impact upon theorists
     like Derrida, Eco, or McLuhan contributes to understanding
     the development of VR out of electromechanical technologies
     and high modernism.  --DFT
 
 
Walter Kalaidjian, "Mainlining Postmodernism: Jenny Holzer,
     Barbara Kruger, and the Art of Intervention"
 
          ABSTRACT:  Taking up the "new times" of postmodernity,
     this essay considers the political resources and limits of
     cultural critique afforded by Kruger's appropriation of
     advertising signage and Holzer's work in light emitting
     diode board technology, both within museum culture and at
     street level.  The essay compares their interventions to the
     more communal, socioaesthetic praxes of Greenpeace and ACT
     UP.  --WK
 
 
Paul McCarthy, "Postmodern Pleasure and Perversity: Scientism and
     Sadism"
 
          ABSTRACT:  The project of this essay is to provide a
     theoretical basis for ethical-political resistance to
     postmodern perversity.  Through a comparison of Deleuze &
     Guattari's (1987) _A Thousand Plateaus_ to de Sade's
     prototypical deconstructionism, this essay traces the nature
     and consequences of the circulation of desire in a
     postmodern order of things (an order implicitly modeled on a
     repressed archetype of the new physics' fluid particle
     flows), and it reveals a complicity between scientism, which
     underpins the postmodern condition, and the sadism of
     incessant deconstruction, which heightens the intensity of
     the pleasure-seeking moment in postmodernism.  --PM
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
TO RETRIEVE SINGLE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE, send a mail message to
listserv@ncsuvm or listserv@ncsuvm.cc.ncsu.edu containing as its
one and only line the command
 
     get [fn ft] pmc-list f=mail
 
(replace [fn ft] with the filename and filetype, as listed in the
table of contents, for the file you want to receive).  There
should be no blank lines, spaces, or other text preceding this
line.
 
TO RETRIEVE THE WHOLE ISSUE as a package, send a mail message to
listserv@ncsuvm or listserv@ncsuvm.cc.ncsu.edu with the command
 
      get pmcv2n3 package pmc-list f=mail
 
If you request the issue as a package, please make certain you
have sufficient virtual disk space on your e-mail account to
receive it (at least half a megabyte).  More detailed
instructions are available in the file NEWUSER PREFACE: to
retrieve this file, send a mail message to listserv@ncsuvm or
listserv@ncsuvm.cc.ncsu.edu with the command
 
     get newuser preface pmc-list f=mail
 
If none of the above works for you, contact the editors.
 
_Postmodern Culture_ uses only ASCII text (the character-code
common to all personal computers): this means that readers can
download the text of the journal from the mainframe (where mail
is received) to any personal computer and import it into almost
all word-processing programs.  Text in the journal uses a 65-
character line, so you should set your margins accordingly before
importing journal files into a word-processing program.
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
_POSTMODERN CULTURE_ is published three times a year (September,
January, and May) using the Revised LISTSERV program ((c) Eric
Thomas 1986, Ecole Centrale de Paris).  It is distributed to
more than 1,800 subscribers worldwide from an IBM mainframe at
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thanks to Chuck Kesler of NCSU Engineering Computer Operations.
_Postmodern Culture_ is a member of the Conference of Editors of
Learned Journals (CELJ) and of the Association of Electronic
Scholarly Journals (AESJ).
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
SUBSCRIPTION to the journal in its electronic-mail form is free.
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payment for subscription, and books for review should be sent to:
 
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Electronic-text submissions and requests for e-mail subscription
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_________________________________________________________________
 
COPYRIGHT: Unless otherwise noted, copyrights for the texts which
comprise this issue of _Postmodern Culture_ are held by their
authors.  The compilation as a whole is Copyright (c) 1992 by
_Postmodern Culture_, all rights reserved.  Items published by
_Postmodern Culture_ may be freely shared among individuals, but
they may not be republished in any medium without express written
consent from the author(s) and advance notification of the
editors.  Issues of _Postmodern Culture_ may be archived for
public use in electronic or other media, as long as each issue is
archived in its entirety and no fee is charged to the user; any
exception to this restriction requires the written consent of the
editors of _Postmodern Culture_.
 
-----------------END OF CONTENTS 592 FOR PMC 2.3-----------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Jun 1992 16:47:35 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      Welcome Usenet Readers
 
VPIEJ-L@VTVM1
VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
bit.listserv.vpiej-l
 
     VPIEJ-L is a discussion list for electronic publishing issues, especially
those related to Scholarly Electronic Journals.  Topics for discussion include
SGML, PostScript, and other e-journal formats; as well as software and hardware
considerations for creation of, storage, and access to e-journals.  Publishers,
editors, technical staff, programmers, librarians, and end-users are welcome
to join.  One goal of the list is to provide better feedback from users to
creators, so we are very interested in receiving and archival issues.  This
should give those of us involved in publishing an idea as to what distribution
methods work and how end-users are accessing and using these publications.
Current readers of and contributors to VPIEJ-L have discussed readability
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Archives of VPIEJ-L are available.  A listing may be retrieved by sending a
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To subscribe, send the following command to LISTSERV@VTVM1 via mail or
interactive message:
    SUB VPIEJ-L your_full_name
where "your_full_name" is your name.  For example:
    SUB VPIEJ-L Joan Doe
 
Or you may read and post to VPIEJ-L via Usenet in the group bit.listserv.vpiej-l
 
Archives will be available soon via anonymous FTP.
 
Owner: James Powell 
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU   (or)   JPOWELL@VTTCF.CC.VT.EDU
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Jun 1992 15:34:15 MDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Donnice=Cochenour%Acquis%Libraries@VINES.COLOSTATE.EDU
Subject:      Software for accessing e-journals on local systems
 
At Colorado State University Libraries we are beginning a pilot project to
make referred electronic journals available on campus.  We have looked at two
software packages to access these through our campus backbone:  WAIS and
XChange.  Neither of these provides the type of access we would like -- a user
friendly command structure with the ability to do keyword searching across
multiple files and the ability to browse through a file.
We would like to know what software others are using to make these files
available across campus.  Please send responses direct to me at
 
Internet:  dcochenour@vines.ColoState.edu
 
Thanks for any information you can share with us.
 
Donnice Cochenour
Serials Librarian
Colorado State University Libraries
Ft.Colling, CO 80526
Internet:  dcochenour@vines.ColoState.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Jun 1992 18:07:07 -0400
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         Edward Vielmetti 
Subject:      Re: Software for accessing e-journals on local systems
 
Donnice=Cochenour%Acquis%Libraries@VINES.COLOSTATE.EDU writes:
: At Colorado State University Libraries we are beginning a pilot project to
: make referred electronic journals available on campus.  We have looked at two
: software packages to access these through our campus backbone:  WAIS and
: XChange.  Neither of these provides the type of access we would like -- a
user
: friendly command structure with the ability to do keyword searching across
: multiple files and the ability to browse through a file.
 
Several sites have used "gopher" to put up e-journals for campus
access.  Gopher is a campus-wide information system tool that offers
a reasonably friendly user interface, keyword searching (via WAIS) and
also browsing.  There's further discussion on the Usenet newsgroup
alt.gopher.
 
--Ed
 
Edward Vielmetti, vice president for research, Msen Inc. emv@Msen.com
      Msen Inc., 628 Brooks, Ann Arbor MI  48103 +1 313 741 1120
"Dogmatic attachement to the supposed merits of a particular structure
   hinders the search for an appropriate structure" -- Robert Fripp
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 3 Jun 1992 08:24:00 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Bill Drew-Serials/Reference Librar. SUNY Morrisville"
              
Subject:      Re: Software for accessing e-journals on local systems
 
I believe you are wrong about WAIS not offering keyword searching.  It does not
offer controlled vocabulary searching.  It is full text searching only.
 
>
>At Colorado State University Libraries we are beginning a pilot project to
>make referred electronic journals available on campus.  We have looked at two
>software packages to access these through our campus backbone:  WAIS and
>XChange.  Neither of these provides the type of access we would like -- a user
>friendly command structure with the ability to do keyword searching across
>multiple files and the ability to browse through a file.
>We would like to know what software others are using to make these files
>available across campus.  Please send responses direct to me at
>
>Internet:  dcochenour@vines.ColoState.edu
>
>Thanks for any information you can share with us.
>
>Donnice Cochenour
>Serials Librarian
>Colorado State University Libraries
>Ft.Colling, CO 80526
>Internet:  dcochenour@vines.ColoState.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 3 Jun 1992 09:39:30 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
Comments:     Resent-From: James Powell 
Comments:     Originally-From: Edward Vielmetti 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      Re: Software for accessing e-journals on local systems
 
> Several sites have used "gopher" to put up e-journals for campus
> access.  Gopher is a campus-wide information system tool that offers
> a reasonably friendly user interface, keyword searching (via WAIS) and
> also browsing.  There's further discussion on the Usenet newsgroup
> alt.gopher.
 
There is a place where you can try out Internet Gopher.  Telnet to:
consultant.micro.umn.edu
login as gopher.  Try it.  James.
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU   (or)   JPOWELL@VTTCF.CC.VT.EDU
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 5 Jun 1992 09:08:26 -0700
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Lee Jaffe, McHenry Library, UC Santa Cruz,
              408/459-3297" 
Subject:      Re: Software for accessing e-journals on local systems
 
original message:
I believe you are wrong about WAIS not offering keyword searching.  It does not
offer controlled vocabulary searching.  It is full text searching only.
====================
 
From limited experience, you can say WAIS does _not_ do keyword searching.
WAIS uses fuzzy-set matching, meaning it looks for patterns of characters.
You pull up some very strange matches, albeit those that fit your search
pattern exactly are ranked highest and appear at the top of the list. And
the odd items are farther down.  For example, search for the word FRANCE,
WAIS will find FRANCE, but terms like experieNCE and aFRAid will appear
higher on the list than FReNCh based on the fuzzy set weighting scheme.
 
More of a problem is that WAIS does not support field searching.
 
-- Lee Jaffe
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 5 Jun 1992 12:12:00 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         LIBRARY@STSCI.BITNET
Subject:      Gone to SLA...
 
You have reached Sarah's answering machine.  Sarah is away until (probably)
Friday 12 June at the Special Libraries Association conference and will respond
to your mail when she returns.  For Library-related questions that can't wait,
please contact Barbara (username SNEAD) or Eliane (username PURCHASE).
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 5 Jun 1992 16:10:00 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      anonymous ftp
 
I have some files available via anonymous ftp on a trial basis.  These files
include some old vpiej-l logs and the listserv.ps file.  Try it out and let
me know by e-mail (jpowell@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu) if you are able to log in and
retrieve the files.
 
ftp 128.173.7.185
login: anonymous
files are in /pub/vpiej-l
 
Please do not use this site between 8AM and 5PM Monday thru Friday until
further notice.  Thank you.
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU   (or)   JPOWELL@VTTCF.CC.VT.EDU
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 6 Jun 1992 17:34:40 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Multiple Electronic Book Reviews
 
> Date:     Sat, 6 Jun 92 11:18:06 PDT
> From: kford@trivia.coginst.uwf.edu
> Subject:     BookReview?
>
> Pat Hayes and I have recently published an edited volume, called "Reasoning
> Agents in a Dynamic World: The Frame Problem." This volume includes a
> collection of papers addressing current perspectives and approaches to the
> frame problem.
>
> We wonder if PSYCOLOQUY would be interested in having someone review the
> book?
> ________________
> Ken Ford        	       	       	       	     (904) 474-2551 (Office)
> Institute for Human & Machine Cognition      (904) 474-3023 (FAX)
> Division of Computer Science    	       	     kford@ai.uwf.edu (internet)
> The University of West Florida               kford@uwf.bitnet (bitnet)
> 11000 University Parkway
> Pensacola, FL  32514
 
Ken,
 
I find both your book and your proposal timely and appropriate.
 
I'm going to propose the following new policy to the PSYCOLOQUY
Editorial Board: I think it would be very useful if PSYCOLOQUY
published single as well as multiple book reviews, with Authors'
Responses, as BBS (Behavioral and Brain Sciences) does. Unlike BBS,
however, PSYCOLOQUY would not be limited in how many books it could
review per year. We strictly limit BBS to 1-2 multiple book reviews per
year; otherwise reviews could easily cannibalize our annual page quota.
As a consequence, many worthy books cannot receive BBS-style multiple
review because only the few that are multiply nominated by the
Associateship and readership can be accorded this treatment.
 
PSYCOLOQUY could publish as many reviews as the editors judge to be of
sufficient quality, and these would all appear with the authors'
responses. A Call for Reviewers could be published first, along with a
500-line Precis of the book by the author. Then those who already have
the book could submit their reviews to PSYCOLOQUY to be considered for
publication, and those who do not have the book could nominate
themselves as reviewers and send PSYCOLOQUY their CV. If the Editorial
Board agrees to invite them to submit a review (and the author's
publisher has agreed in advance to supply a specified number of
reviewer(s) with the book on condition they agree to submit their
review by a specified date) then PSYCOLOQUY could publish the
(accepted) reviews, with responses.
 
I think this could perform a real service for the field, where book
reviews are too few, come too late after the book is published,
are usually not multilateral, and rarely have a response from the
author.
 
So I encourage you and Pat to submit a 500-line self-contained Precis
of your book, which we will then publish with a Call for Reviewers.
Please also arrange with your publishers to have review copies
ready to be sent to approved reviewers (BBS sends out 25 review
copies; authors and publishers will have to decide for themselves
how many review copies to make available for multiple book reviews
in PSYCOLOQUY). I will meanwhile solicit feedback on the proposal
from the Editorial Board. We will do it on an experimental basis
with your book, and if the Board agrees (and the field responds) we
will make it a permanent policy of PSYCOLOQUY. (Note that freely
submitted book reviews are already eligible to be considered for
publication in PSYCOLOQUY.)
 
There already exists at least one other electronic journal that publishes
book reviews (the Bryn Mawr Classical Review, edited by Jim O'Donnell).
Based on the impact of and demand for BBS multiple reviews, it would
probably be a good time for PSYCOLOQUY to develop this dimension
as well.
 
Stevan Harnad
Co-Editor, PSYCOLOQUY
 
PS The ease with which this proposal can be put to the PSYC Board,
readership, and interested electronic-journal-publishing community,
and the ease with which the policy can be adopted and implemented if
the Board agrees, are still further evidence of how the speed and
scope of this remarkable new medium are adapted to the biological tempo
of human thought...
=========================================================================
Date:         Sun, 7 Jun 1992 19:19:32 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      Re: Multiple Electronic Book Reviews
In-Reply-To:  Message of Sat,
              6 Jun 1992 17:34:40 EDT from 
 
Stevan--
 
_Postmodern Culture_ also publishes book reviews (nine in the last issue)
ranging in length from 750-3000 words.  We think that prompt and very current
reviews are one of the things that e-journals can do better than print
journals.
 
John Unsworth
Co-editor, _Postmodern Culture_
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 10 Jun 1992 13:31:18 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         GMCMILLA@VTVM1.BITNET
Subject:      Scholarly Communications program query
 
James, would you please post this on VPIEJ-L?  Thanks.
 
On June 29, 1992 the Scholarly Communications Committee will meet.
(We are a committee of the American Library Association's
Association for Library Collections and Technical Services--ALCTS.)
This meeting will include discussion about program topics for next
summer's New Orleans ALA conference.  We would like to gather ideas
for discussion at our up-coming Committee meeting.
 
We would like our program to be useful to ALCTS' members and we are
leaning away from a theoretical program towards process-oriented
presentations.
 
The program theme will be "electronic access and scholarly
communications."  Our agenda includes program ideas such as
'document delivery systems' and 'libraries are making electronic
journals available.'
 
If you favor one of the above ideas or have another idea, please
let me know before June 20.
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
.........................Gail McMillan........................
___....____________......Serials Team Leader..................
\  \../  ___   ___/.........University Libraries VPI&SU.......
.\  \/  /../  /.............Blacksburg, VA - (703) 231-9252...
..\    /../  /..............FAX (703) 231-3694................
...\  /../  /.................................................
....\/../__/..........INTERNET.....gmcmilla@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU....
......................BITNET.......gmcmilla@VTVM1.............
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 10 Jun 1992 12:53:49 CDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Raleigh C. Muns" 
Subject:      List Review Service (VPIEJ-L)
 
The following review is a regular feature of LIBREF-L. To subscribe to
LIBREF-L send a single line message with no subject to LISTSERV@KENTVM
 
                 SUBSCRIBE LIBREF-L your name
 
Disagreements and clarifications can be forwarded to the editor for
posting on LIBREF-L and this list if appropriate. -R. Muns
 
 
                     LIST REVIEW SERVICE         ISSN: 1060-8192
 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Vol. 1, No. 9       VPIEJ-L (Electronic Journals)     08 JUN 1992
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
Published bi-weekly, when school is in session, by The University
of Missouri, St. Louis Libraries. Raleigh C. Muns, editor.
 
.................................
 
SYNOPSIS OF ONE MONTH'S ACTIVITY-
.................................
 
Name of List Reviewed:        VPIEJ-L
Location:                     LISTSERV@VTVM1 (Bitnet)
 
Listowners:                   James Powell
                              BITNET: JPOWELL@VTVM1
 
                              Jon Hayes
                              BITNET: JDHAYES@VTVM1
 
Number of Subscribers:        498 users in 18 countries
 
Period Monitored:             01 MAY 92 - 31 MAY 92 (inclusive)
 
No. Messages Month Monitored: 31
No. Queries Posted:           02  (06 % of total activity)
No. Non-queries Posted:       29  (94 % of total activity)
 
Lines Sent (w/o headers):     1082 (app. 47 screens of 23 lines)
 
Msgs. Posted Prev. 3 Months:  115
 
Searchable Archives:          Yes
 
.................................
 
REVIEW -
.................................
 
The goal of this list is to discuss the issues of publishing, archiving,
and accessing electronic journals (e-journals). I have monitored this
list since it was opened to the public in April 1992.
 
The list's postings are extemely Professional (with a capital "P") and
I hesitate to recommend it to dilettantes. The subject material posted
tends to be esoteric and technical nuts and bolts messages on e-journal
production and dissemination. Several postings discussed the
philosophical aspects of electronic journals, their role, and their
value in scholarly communication.
 
A number of the subjects discussed have been covered on many of the
library oriented lists (e.g., PACS-L, LIBREF-L) but this appears to be
an appropriate narrowing of subject scope by the list owners.
Subscribers to other lists who have regularly plucked out e-journal
oriented messages may find it more efficient to subscribe to VPIEJ-L.
 
Sample topics have included:
 
                The problems with mixing text and graphics in
                e-journals.
 
                Issue and volume number information in e-journals,
                specifically in the e-journal PSYCOLOQUY.
 
                Announcements of e-journal availability.
 
To date, this has not been a query-dominated "where can I find?" list.
Strong contributions by subscribers make this an information dense
resource (my euphemism for "really dull unless you are truly interested
in the subject matter").
 
-R. Muns
 
.................................
 
SUGGESTED USES FOR LIST -
.................................
 
        1)     Virtual gathering point for e-journal publishers.
 
        2)     Increase awareness of the issues surrounding e-journal
               publication.
 
        3)     Input to e-journal publishers from user population.
 
.................................
 
BITNET SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION -
.................................
 
Send an e-mail message with blank subject line to:
 
     LISTSERV@VTVM1
 
Message should consist solely of:
 
     SUBSCRIBE VPIEJ-L your_name
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = END REVIEW = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin
board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.
Libraries are authorized to add these reviews to their collections
at no cost.  This message must appear on copied material.  All
commercial use requires permission.
 
Opinions expressed are solely those of the reviewer and do not
represent the views of the University of Missouri, St. Louis.
 
Copyright 1992. Raleigh C. Muns (Reference Librarian)
Thomas Jefferson Library, University of Missouri, St. Louis
8001 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63121 (ph:(314) 553-5059)
 
BITNET ADDRESS: SRCMUNS@UMSLVMA
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 10 Jun 1992 16:41:08 -0700
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was
              ljgould@MILTON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU
From:         Linda Gould 
Subject:      Re: Scholarly Communications program query
In-Reply-To:  <9206101735.AA01984@milton.u.washington.edu>
 
"Libraries are making e-journals available."  We need to know more about
what libraries are doing with them, and also, whether faculty are using them,
and if not, why not, and if so, how?   I could give you about 50 issues we
raised here at UW on this last week.
 
Linda Gould
Assoc Director, Library Collections
Univ. of Wa. Libs.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 11 Jun 1992 10:15:17 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Priscilla Caplan 
Subject:      ALA ANNOUNCEMENT
 
 This announcement has been posted to PACS-L, VPIEJ-L, and SERIALST:
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                 AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
 
      ***  LITA PROGRAMMER/ANALYST INTEREST GROUP  ***
 
             Sunday, June 28 (8:30 - 10:30 a.m.)
 
          Grand Hyatt Union Square - Potrero Room
 
 
Are you offering your patrons access to electronic journals?
Planning to?  Thinking about it?
 
Join us for an informal discussion of the technical aspects of access
to e-journals.   How do we receive them, store them, make our users
aware of them?   What software do we use for indexing and display?
How do they relate to our existing opacs and library systems?
What about postscript, image, and non-ascii files?   Can we offer
access to archives? notification of new issues?
 
Everyone interested in e-journals is invited to participate.  Come
and share your experiences, opinions and questions.
 
We will also have a brief business meeting following the discussion.
Topics include ideas for future interest group meetings and plans for
the LITA National Convention.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 11 Jun 1992 12:20:28 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         PHYLLIS 
Subject:      No Subject Given
 
          set vpiej-l nomail Phyllis Niles
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 11 Jun 1992 11:46:00 PDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         LES 
Subject:      June VisCom Newsletter
 
ViewPoints
Newsletter of the Visual Communication Division of the Association for
Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
June, 1992
Electronic Edition
ISSN: 1063-0325
*********************************************************
*********************************************************
Vision, misty rain, ribs and a mountain top - all in Montreal
Julianne Hickson Newton
First Vice Head
 
    VisCom officers have kept the phone lines busy from Montreal to Los
Angeles working to get a stellar, diverse group of journalists, researchers,
artists and teachers to discuss topics that everybody's either already
talking about or that we should be talking about.
    We have planned sessions on visual thinking, ethics, teaching,
research, the changing nature of journalism practice and image-making in
many forms, ranging from self imaging to typographical imaging to digital
imaging to societal imaging.
    And we're going to meet for the sole purpose of setting an agenda for
our future work.
    Trust me -- this is one AEJMC you don't want to miss.
    Besides, where else can you light a candle in Notre Dame Cathedral,
taxi up a mountain to view the city in a cool, misty rain, practice your
French with a lot of friendly people and also eat some of the best (or even
Tony Roma ribs) food in the world?
    VisCom activities will begin Tuesday, August 4 with a pre-convention
workshop on "Getting Visual Throughout the Curriculum." AEJMC President
Terry Hynes will open the workshop which is co-sponsored with the
Advertising, Magazine, Newspaper and Radio-Television divisions.
    Hal Glicksman, a specialist in brain hemisphere research will keynote
the workshop discussing "Visual Problem Solving: How It Works." Glicksman
is associate director of the Center for Educational Applications of Brain
Hemisphere Research at California State University, Long Beach.
    The workshop also will include a session in which five master
teachers will demonstrate teaching modules using or applying visual
communication techniques and theories.
    Tuesday evening, from 7 to 10, the division has called a caucus of
VisCom members and all other persons interested in the field of visual
communication. Purpose of the caucus is to set priorities and recommend a
course of action for the future of visual communication research, teaching
and practice.
    Invited guests include Glicksman; Adam Clayton Powell III, Director
of the Minority Television Project in San Francisco; Larry Gross of the
Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania; James W.
Tankard, Jr. of the University of Texas at Austin and editor of Journalism
Monographs; and Shiela Reaves of the University of Wisconsin--Madison.
    Research sessions will highlight 15 papers concentrating primarily on
magazine photography, information graphics and design, and photojournalism
issues -- and take a look at the program to see whose papers got accepted
this year -- it's quite a group of people! Three people had projects accepted
for the special projects session which moderator Danal Terry of Southwest
Texas State University has titled "Is This Visual Communication?" (3:30 to
5 p.m. Thursday, August 6)
    Another key research session co-sponsored with Communication
Theory and Methodology will focus on Research Issues in Visual
Communication. Moderated by James W. Tankard, Jr., the session will also
feature Larry Gross, Pamela Shoemaker of Ohio State University and
associate editor of Journalism Quarterly and Jay Black, editor of the Journal
of Mass Media Ethics.
    "Rodney King, Murphy Brown and the Great Pyramids" (favorite
session title, ed.) will get their turn in a panel discussion of how different
kinds of images affect us all. Panelists include Larry Gross, Keith Kenney of
South Carolina and Shiela Reaves, with Julianne Newton as moderator (10:30
a.m. to noon, Friday, August 7).
    Two design-oriented sessions will look at how Canadian art directors
deal with their bilingual/bicultural world (11:15 a.m. Wednesday, August 5)
and how typography, culture and society are interrelated (3:30 p.m.
Thursday, August 6).
    Two other sessions will focus on moving beyond ethics, gender and
cultural stereotyping. One, which will concentrate on non-stereotypical
images of native people, will feature Lucy Ganje of North Dakota; Alainis
Obomsawin, the leading native filmmaker in Canada; Martin Loft of the
Mohalk Cultural Center, and Adam Clayton Powell III, whose San Francisco
television station regularly includes native programming.  That session is
scheduled from 3 to 4:40 p.m. Wednesday, August 5.
    Another culturally oriented session will focus on how to recognize
and avoid perpetuating gender and ethnic bias in our teaching of future
communicators (3:15 - 4:45 p.m. Friday, August 7).
    Two sessions will take a hard look at how journalism educators can
prepare students for current and future changes in our field. One session
titled "Redefining Journalists/Redefining Journalism? The Impact of
Emerging Technologies" will examine how new technologies are reshaping
the nature of journalism practice (1:30 p.m. Friday, August 7). Another
called "People and Machines: Using Computers to Teach and Transmit
Information" will look at how computers are changing the way we think,
research, interact and teach (11:45 a.m. Saturday, August 8).
    Another extremely important session will be a panel critique of
introductory courses in visual communication (5 to 6:30 Friday, August 7).
Jan Colbert, chair of VisCom's Teaching Committee, has asked that everyone
who has or is teaching courses in visual communication send her syllabi for
our new Syllabus Bank.
    VisCom also is co-sponsoring with the Advertising and International
divisions a timely session on implications of lifting the ban on tobacco
advertising in Canada (1:30 to 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, August 5).
    And be sure to put the Annual VisCom Business Meeting on your
calendar -- 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 5. We have a lot to do including
discussion on our election system, the constitution and elect the next
second vice-head.
    We also have planned three exhibits for you -- we'll have this year's
College Photography of the Year Exhibition again, along with the AEJMC Logo
Entries and an edited version of "Jane Evelyn Atwood, Co Rentmeester,
Moneta Sleet -- Cross Cultural Experiences," courtesy of James Kelly and
Kodak.
    Bob Baker and Paul Lester also have a couple of special tours for
VisCom members in the works.
    So ... we're looking forward to seeing you there.
*********************************************************
*********************************************************
Conventions and caucuses and constitutions, oh my
Bob Baker
Head
 
    Many of you responded to my call of about two months ago regarding
the Visual Communication Caucus we have planed for the night of Tuesday,
August 4. The Caucus will be a time to address issues of concern to all of
our VisCom membership who never seem to have enough time to address
them during our annual business meeting or who are unable to attend.
    But, more than the caucus, if you miss this year's international
convention in Montreal, you'll really be missing something. Julie Newton has
done a wonderful job along with our standing committee chairs and others in
assembling a full range of activities that you can read about elsewhere in
this newsletter.
    Likewise, you will find a draft copy of a VisCom Division
constitution. Although we've existed for a decade (after the merger of
Graphics and Photojournalism divisions), we can't locate a working
document and want to change that. The proposed document will be voted on
at the annual business meeting and if you would like to get something on the
floor, drop me a note at 101 Woodlawn Circle, Summerville, SC 29485. The
formalizing of a procedure for electing a second vice-head is perhaps the
most controversial element included and we need your feedback. I hope it's
been a good year for all of you.  See ya in Montreal.
*********************************************************
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Speaker grants support visual and multicultural experts
 
    Thanks to two speaker grants from AEJMC, VisCom will bring two
internationally known speakers to Montreal.
    Hal Glicksman, associate director of the Center for the Educational
Applications of Brain Hemisphere Research (Brain-Ed Center) and Adam
Clayton Powell III, an international media consultant will be among the
many distinguished panelists and speakers on the VisCom program in
Montreal.
    Glicksman will highlight VisCom's pre-convention workshop with a
discussion of "Visual Problem Solving -- How it Works." The workshop,
titled "Getting Visual Throughout the Curriculum," is scheduled from 1 to 5
p.m. Tuesday, August 4. Glicksman's talk will begin at 1:15 p.m. Those
interested in attending the workshop should register on the main AEJMC
convention registration form. The cost for the workshop is $15.
    Powell will make presentations in two sessions: "Moving Beyond
Stereotyping: Images of Native People" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, August 5 and
"Redefining Journalism -- Redefining Journalists? The Impact of Emerging
Technologies" at 1:30 p.m. Friday, August 7.
    Glicksman has been associate director of the prestigious Brain-Ed
Center since 1986. The research center, located at California State
University, Long Beach is based on the work of Dr. Betty Edwards, author of
Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and Drawing on the Artist Within.
Edwards, Glicksman and the center staff give workshops on creativity and
visual thinking throughout the world.
    Glicksman developed and taught the first course on drawing with
computers at California State, Long Beach where he teaches in the Art
Department. Glicksman established and operates a computer data base
devoted to information on perception, cognition and creativity.
    Glicksman's career has included heading the Masters Program in
Museum Training at George Washington University, serving as associate
director of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., writing how-to
books on home computers for teenagers, working to get access to computers
for persons with disabilities and teaching 19th and 20th century art history
at several universities.
    Powell is manager of the Minority Television Project, which began a
multicultural television broadcast service on Channel 32 (KMTP) in San
Francisco in 1991. He also heads a broadcast consulting firm for clients in
the U.S. and other countries. This spring he has been working with broadcast
officials in South Africa to restructure South African media.
    Powell was executive producer of Jesse Jackson's weekly national
television program from 1990 to 1991 and was vice president for News and
Information of National Public Radio for three years. He also has served on
the National Advisory Panel of the U.S. Congress' Office of Technology
Assessment, has been a Freedom Forum Media Studies Fellow and won the
1979 Overseas Press Club Award for best interpretation of foreign news.
*********************************************************
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Electronic ViewPoints launched with a control-Z
 
    Beginning with the February edition of ViewPoints, an electronic
version has been produced for distribution through e-mail networks along
with a printed version through traditional means.  News of interest to the
VisCom division may be of interest to a wide variety of individuals who may
not receive a printed version.  It is hoped that e-mail users will join the
division after reading the scope of the concern within the pages of the
newsletter.
    To further the act of distribution, a Library of Congress ISSN
designation was requested and received.  The number, 1063-0325, uniquely
identifies ViewPoints within databases around the world.  For example,
Michael Strangelove at the University of Ottawa maintains a database with
over 26 e-journals and 63 e-newsletters.  The networking possibilities
become complex and intriguing quite quickly with the international Internet
system.  Presently, ViewPoints is distributed through the JForum within
CompuServe, VPIEJ-L, an electronic publishing interest group on Internet
and two informal interest groups also on Internet.
    As expertise is developed concerning e-mail distribution, the e-mail
version will soon have all of the typographical and pictorial elements as the
printed version.  It might even be wise to consider an electronic, juried
visual communication journal as a low-cost alternative to a printed version.
 
Please send suggestions and story ideas to:
 
Paul Lester
ViewPoints Editor
Associate Professor
School of Communications
California State University
Fullerton, California 92634
VOX: 714 449-5302
FAX: 714 773-2209
VAX: in%"lester@fullerton.edu"
CIS:  70372, 3217
 
    To join the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass
Communication (AEJMC) and its Visual Communication Division, call (803)
777-2005 or write to:
AEJMC
1621 College Street
University of South Carolina
College of Journalism
Columbia, SC 29208-0251
 
    For information about membership in CompuServe call (800) 848-
8199 or in Ohio, (614) 457-0802.
    If you are connected to internet and wish to join VPIEJ-L, send a mail
message to LISTSERV@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU and simply type:
SUB VPIEJ-L (Your Name).
    If you want to receive news of interest about computer assisted
journalism, send an internet e-mail message to:
Elliot Parker
Journalism Department
Central Michigan University
3ZLUFUR@CMUVM.CSV.CMICH.EDU
 
Roll over Gutenberg!
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Proposed Constitution of the VisCom Division
 
Article 1 - Name
    Section 1. The name of the organization shall be the Visual
Communication Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and
Mass Communication (hereinafter referred to as "the Division").
Article 2 - Purposes
    Section 1. The purposes of the Visual Communication Division shall be
to explore and exchange ideas on:
        (a)Visual communication functions, practices, theories and
historical development.
        (b)Ethical concepts and social responsibility.
        (c)Critical analysis of functions and performance of
occupational groups and individuals engaged
           in visual communication.
        (d)Career opportunities for and responsibilities of students
pursuing careers in visual
           communication.
    Section 2. Special stress in the above objectives shall be placed on:
        (a)Effective teaching methods, balanced curriculum,
development of research, and public service.
        (b)Functions of standing committees of AEJMC:
            (1)Professional Freedom and Responsibility,
            (2)Research, and
            (3)Teaching Standards.
    Section 3. The Division shall cooperate with other divisions of AEJMC
in drawing upon the accumulated knowledge of all divisions to further
Division objectives.
    Section 4. The Division shall seek effective liaison with the National
Press Photographers Association, Society for Newspaper Design and other
visual communication groups to further Division objectives.
    Section 5. The above objectives should not be seen as restrictive upon
officers of the Division in planning and carrying out activities in
furtherance of the development of visual communication practice and the
advancement of visual communication education.
Article 3 - Membership
    Section 1. Regular membership in the Division shall be restricted to
members in good standing of the Association for Education in Journalism
and Mass Communication who are dues-paying members of the Division.
    Section 2. Associate membership in the Division may be granted, upon
affirmative vote of the regular membership, to individuals who have made
outstanding contributions to the objectives of the Division.
    Section 3. Division dues shall be fixed by the executive committee of
the Division, upon ratification of the membership at an annual meeting.
Funds shall be deposited with the treasurer of AEJMC.
Article 4 - Officers
    Section 1. Officers of the Division shall be as follows: head, first vice
head and second vice head.  These officers shall be chosen in the manner
prescribed in the by-laws.
    Section 2. Terms of office of the head, first vice head and second vice
head shall be for one year, beginning with the conclusion of Old Business at
the Division Business Meeting held during the annual convention of AEJMC
and extending until the same moment of the subsequent year's convention, or
until a successor has qualified and taken office.
    Section 3. The head shall appoint three standing committee
chairpersons (with parallel responsibilities to AEJMC's standing
committees) and a newsletter editor and a membership chairperson, who
along with the immediate past head and current first and second vice heads
will comprise the executive committee of the Division.
    Section 4. Each officer shall discharge the duties of office as
prescribed in the by-laws.
Article 5 - Meetings
    Section 1. The Division shall meet at least once a year to conduct an
election, receive reports of the previous year's officers and committees,
and for any other business that may arise.  The annual meeting shall be at
the time and place of, and concurrent with, the annual convention of AEJMC.
    Section 2. The executive committee shall meet at least twice a year
concurrent with the annual AEJMC convention at which it was formed and on
the day prior to the following convention's divisional business meeting.  The
AEJMC president or visual communication division head may call special
meetings of the executive committee.
Article 6 - Committees
    Section 1. The Research Committee Chair shall be responsible for
planning and coordination of Division research and creative project
activities.
    Section 2. The Teaching Standards Division Chair shall be responsible
for planning and coordination of Division teaching activities.
    Section 3. The Professional Freedom and Responsibility Committee
Chair shall be responsible for planning and coordination of Division
activities related to issues of professional freedom and responsibility.
    Section 4. Other special or ad hoc committees may be appointed by the
head as the executive committee shall from time to time deem necessary to
carry on the work of the Division.
Article 7 - Parliamentary Authority
    The rules contained in Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised shall
govern the Division in all cases to which they are applicable and which they
are not inconsistent with this Constitution or any special rules of order
which the Division may adopt.
Article 8 - Amendments
    Section 1. The Constitution and its by-laws may be amended by a
majority vote of the membership present and voting at any annual meeting.
Article 9 - Promulgation
    Section 1. The Constitution and its by-laws become effective upon
adoption by a majority vote of those present and voting at the annual
meeting.
BY-LAWS
Article 1 - Nominations and Elections
    Section 1. The Division membership shall elect, during the annual
meeting, a second vice head who will automatically become first vice head
the following year and Division head the year after that.
    Section 2. A nominating committee comprising the immediate past
head and two other previous Division heads will be named by the current
head in the month following the annual convention.  That committee will
request by mail at least three months prior to the annual meeting, but in no
case later than April 15, nominations from the membership for second vice
head.  All nominees will be notified by the chair of the nominating
committee at least two weeks prior to the annual meeting, but in no case
later than July 15.  Nominees desiring their names not be put forward on the
ballot at the annual meeting may do so in writing no later than one week
prior to the annual meeting.
    Section 3. If the head, first vice head and/or second vice head
positions should become vacant for any reason, the executive committee
will elect individuals to fill the vacancies.
Article 2 - Duties of Officers
    Section 1. The head of the Division shall be the executive officer of
the Division and shall administer its affairs with the advice and consent of
the executive committee, and shall appoint any necessary committees.
He/she shall have ultimate responsibility for the Division's year-long
activities.  He/she shall be a member of the Advisory Board of AEJMC.  The
head of the Division shall approve all Division expenditures in excess of
$100.
    Section 2. The first vice head shall be responsible for preparation of
the program for the annual meeting.  He/she shall be responsible for
carrying out the duties of the head in the event of incapacity for whatever
reason.
    Section 3. The second vice head shall assist the head as called upon by
the head.  He/she shall keep minutes of meetings and other affairs of the
Division.
    Section 4. Duties of the executive committee shall be to counsel
officers, to make interim appointments to fill unexpired terms of officers,
and to assist officers in guiding Division affairs between annual meetings.
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1992 Montreal VisCom program: If you don't see it ...
... submit a session idea or paper for next year
 
1-5 p.m. -- Teaching Workshop
        "Getting Visual Throughout the Curriculum"
        Co-sponsored with Magazine, Newspaper, Advertising, Radio-TV
divisions
        Rob Heller, Tennessee, Moderator
        1 p.m. --  Welcome, Terry Hynes, Cal State--Fullerton,
President, AEJMC
        1:15 p.m. --  "Visual Problem Solving:  How It Works," Hal
Glicksman, Center for
Educational Applications of Brain Hemisphere Research, Cal State--Long
Beach
        2:10 p.m. --  Master Teaching Session
                Advertising:  Sandra Moriarty, Colorado
                Magazine:  Patricia Prijatel, Drake
                Newspaper:  Pegie Stark, Poynter Institute
                Public Relations:  Marilyn Kern-Foxworth, Texas
A&M
                Radio-TV:  Paul Steinle, Miami
        4:10 --  Accessing Campus Visual Resources, Pegie Stark
        4:30 --  Roundtable Q&A, Glicksman, Heller, Kern-Foxworth,
Moriarty, Prijatel, Stark, Steinle
    The workshop is designed for the novice and veteran AEJMC member
who is interested in novel  ways to incorporate visual
    communication techniques and theory into a variety of courses within
journalism and mass communication.
    Register through AEJMC Headquarters, $15.
7-10 p.m. --  "Caucus:  Mapping the Future of Visual Communication"
          All interested persons invited
    Robert Baker, Pennsylvania State, Moderator
    The caucus will focus on determining priorities and recommending
action for creating a unifying umbrella for the varied agenda
    of visual communication teaching, research and practice.
Wednesday, August 5
8:15-9:30 a.m. -- 1991-92 Executive Committee Meeting
9:45-11 a.m. -- "Information Graphics and Design"/Juried Research Papers
    Ray Chattman, Society of Newspaper Design, Moderator
    Prabu David, North Carolina, "Accuracy of Visual Perception of
Quantitative Graphics:  An Exploratory Study"
    Barry A. Hollander, Georgia, "Information Graphics and the Bandwagon
Effect:  Does the Visual Display of Opinion Aid in
    Persuasion?"
    James D. Kelly, Southern Illinois, "The Effects of Tabular and
Graphical Display Formats on Time Spent Processing Statistics"
    William A. Mikulak, Pennsylvania, "Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny:
Iconography of Two Corporate Stars"
    James W. Tankard Jr., Texas--Austin, "Visual Crosstabs:  A Technique
for Enriching Information Graphics"
    Pegie Stark, Poynter Institute, Discussant
11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. --  "A World of Images:  Common Language or Tower of
Babel?
    Co-sponsored with Council of Affiliates, a PF&R Session
    Enn Raudsepp, Concordia University, Montreal, Moderator
    Lucy Lacava, Art Director, The Gazette, Montreal
    Julien Chung, Art Director, La Presse, Montreal
    Danielle LeBel, Art Director, L'Actualite
    Nick Burnett, Art Director, Maclean's
Lunch Hour
1:30-2:45 p.m. --  "Lifting the Ban on Tobacco Advertising in Canada:  Free
Speech Implications for  Canada and the United States"
    Co-sponsored with Advertising and International Communications
divisions
    Glen Nowak, Georgia, Moderator
    Jon Baggaley, Concordia University
    Niquette Delage, Canadian Advertising Foundation
    Jim Pokrywczynski, Marquette
    Benoit Bouchard, Minister of Health, Ottawa
3-4:30 p.m. --  "Moving Beyond Stereotyping:  Images of Native People"
     Co-sponsored with Minorities and Communication
    James Kelly, Southern Illinois, Moderator
    Lucy Ganje, North Dakota
    Alanis Obomsawin, Filmmaker and Director of the National Film Board
of Canada
    Martin Loft, Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa, Kahnawake, Quebec (Mohalk
Cultural Center)
    Adam Clayton Powell III, The Minority Television Project, San
Francisco
4:45-7 p.m. -- Convention Keynote Address and Opening Reception
7 p.m. -- Annual VisCom Business Meeting
Thursday, August 6
8:15-9:45 a.m. --  "Issues in Photojournalism," Juried Research Papers
    Jim Whitfield, Northeast Louisiana , Moderator
    John Anderson, Indiana, "Timothy H. O'Sullivan:  His Role in the Great
Surveys of the American West"
    Joseph P. Bernt and Marilyn S. Greenwal, Ohio, "Tolerance of Senior
Daily Newspaper Editors for Photographs of          People with
AIDS and Gays and Lesbians"
    Paul Lester, Cal State--Fullerton, "African-American Pictorial
Coverage in Four U.S. Newspapers, 1937-1990"
    Sandra E. Moriarty and Shay Sayre, Colorado, "An Interpretive Study of
Visual Cues in Advertising"
    Dolf Zillman, Christopher R. Harris, and Karla Schweitzer, Alabama,
"Effects of Perspective and Angle Manipulations in Portrait
    Photographs on the Attribution of Traits in Depicted Persons"
    Zoe Smith, Missouri, Discussant
10-11:45 a.m. -- Joint Plenary by standing committees for Teaching
Standards, PF&R and Research
Lunch Hour
1:30-3 p.m. --  "Research Issues in Visual Communication"
    Co-sponsored with Communication Theory and Methodology Division
    James W. Tankard Jr., Texas-Austin, Moderator/Discussant
    Pamela J. Shoemaker, Ohio
    Larry Gross, Pennsylvania
    Jay Black, Alabama
3:30-5 p.m. -- "Is This Visual Communication?"
    Co-sponsored with Communication Technology and Policy Interest
Group
    Danal Terry, Southwest Texas State, Moderator
    Paul Lester, Cal State--Fullerton, "Altered Histories:  An Exploration
of the Technical and Ethical Concerns of Photo          Manipulation
Software"
    Lucy Ganje, North Dakota, "'Studio One':  Theory and Skills Combined,
A Successful Model"
    Don Sneed, Mississippi, "Galgano and Fitzsimmons:  San Diego's
Photojournalists"
    James Roche, Maryland, Discussant
5:15-6:45 p.m. -- "Typography, Culture and Society"
    Robert L. Craig, Minnesota, Moderator
    Kay Amert, Iowa, "Formation of an Apparatus of Literacy"
    Robert L. Craig, Minnesota, "On the Aesthetics of Typographic Style"
    Kevin Barnhurst, Syracuse, "Cultural Backgrounds of Newspaper
Typography"
Friday, August 7
10:30 a.m.-noon --  "Issues in Visual Ethics:  Rodney King, Murphy Brown and
the Great Pyramids"
    Julianne H. Newton, Texas--Austin, Moderator/Discussant
    Keith Kenney, South Carolina
    Shiela Reaves, Wisconsin--Madison
    Larry Gross, Pennsylvania
Lunch Hour
1:30-3 p.m. -- "Redefining Journalism--Redefining Journalists?  The Impact
of Emerging Technologies"
    Co-sponsored with Newspaper Division, Communication Technology
and Policy Interest Group,  Mass Com Bibliographers
    Wayne Danielson, Texas--Austin, Moderator/Discussant
    Patsy Watkins, Arkansas
    Roger Fidler, Knight-Ridder and Freedom Forum
    Adam Clayton Power III, Minority Television Project, San Francisco
3:15-4:45 p.m. -- "Hegemony in the Classroom"
     Co-sponsored with Commission on the Status of Women and History
Division
    Lucy Ganje, North Dakota, Moderator/Discussant
    Lana Rakow, Wisconsin--Parkside
    Sue Lafky, Iowa
    Reggie Owens, Grambling
5-6:30 p.m. -- "Core Course Critique:   The Introductory Course in Visual
Communication"
    Jan Colbert, Missouri, Moderator/Discussant
    Kevin Barnhurst, Syracuse
    Dona Schwartz, Minnesota
    James Gentry, Nevada--Reno
               ***Send syllabi to Jan Colbert for Syllabus Bank!!***
7 p.m. -- Tour and Reception for VisCom Members (to be announced)
Saturday, August 8
7 a.m. -- 1992-93 Executive Committee Meeting
10 a.m. --  "Magazine Photography," Juried Research Papers
    Co-sponsored with Magazine Division
    Jeffrey John, Wright State, Moderator and Discussant
    James H. Bissland and David Kielmeyer, Bowling Green State,
"Bypassed by the Revolution?  Photojournalists in a Decade of
    Change"
    Christopher R. Harris and Don E. Tomlinson, Middle Tennessee State,
"The Lanham Act and Copyright:
    Application vis a vis Computer Manipulation of Photographic Imagery"
    Leah Grant, "Portrayal of Women in Playboy Cartoons"
    David D. Perlmutter, Minnesota, "Many Tiananmens:  A Comparative
Analysis of Coverage in a Publication by the Chinese        Government,
A Human Rights Organization, and U.S. News Magazines"
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. --  People and Machines:  Using Computers to Teach and
Transmit    Information
    Co-sponsored with Council of Affiliates
    Karen Christy, Texas--Austin, Moderator/Discussant
    Danal Terry, Southwest Texas State
    Brian Johnson, Illinois
    S. Griffin Singer, Texas--Austin
7 p.m.  --  Convention Closing Gala
Other Activities:
    Exhibits:
    College Photography of the Year Exhibition
    "Jane Evelyn Atwood, Co Rentmeester, Moneta Sleet--Cross Cultural
Experiences," Kodak Techniques of the Masters
    Videoconference Series (VisCom edited version by James Kelly,
Southern Illinois, for VisCom)
    AEJMC Logo Contest Entries
    Exhibit Tours in Montreal:  To be Announced
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The permissions game: An obstacle to teaching
Craig Denton
Membership Chair
 
    Let's say you want to reproduce a particular front page from USA
Today in your upcoming textbook. You write the newspaper for permission
and they grant it, but with a disturbing qualifier. Two of the photos on that
day's front page were not shot by USA Today photographers. Consequently,
you are instructed to either get permission from those photographers, or
their representatives, or you must reproduce that page from USA Today with
the photos blocked out.
    Amazed by USA Today's timidity at not believing it owned rights to
its presentation of the news on a particular day, you dutifully find out who
owns the rights to the other two pictures. One of the pictures is a mug shot
of a cabinet member that was snapped by a Washington D.C. freelancer. You
track her down and she gives her separate permission.
    The second permission doesn't really worry you. Afterall, the photo is
a mug shot of a character from the just-released movie Dick Tracy.
Touchstone Pictures probably would be happy to grant permission because
the shot originally was a photograph from its publicity department, which
no doubt was ecstatic when USA Today promoted the movie on the front
page. Then, you receive a letter from a lawyer at the Walt Disney Company:
    "Pursuant to our company's current third party obligations and our
company's present policy regarding copyrights, we must deny your request.
Please be assured that our refusal to grant the permission you have
requested is not capricious but is based on experience and good reason, and
on the necessity of complying with the copyright laws and our company's
current obligations. We sincerely appreciate your desire to use our DISNEY
properties and hope you understand our position in having to deny your
request."
    Now, it's close to press time. What do you do? Do you edit out the
page from USA Today, leaving a dramatic gap in tour illustration text? Or do
you reproduce the page and block out the Touchstone photo, letting the page
look like it had been censored.
    In writing Graphics for Visual Communication, this and other equally
baffling responses to seeking permission suggests that there is an indirect
threat to the free flow of information in textbooks. That threat seems to be
a product of greed, since textbooks are for-profit ventures, and confusion
over the scope and protections of the revised, 1978 copyright law. Yet,
textbooks don't quite fit the strict commercial model because they also
incorporate the somewhat selfless motivations of fair comment and
guidance for future practitioners. When greed and altruism collide, it seems
that only money talks, and in too many instances, other claims are cynically
dismissed. Here are some of the permissions issues, then, that stand in the
way of our ability to teach, at least through textbooks.
    * The profit worm - Some publications or agents don't feel like they
have any responsibility for helping educate the people who eventually they
will be hiring. Rather, they see them as profit centers. Some media, with
magazines being the worst offenders, charge unreasonable fees for
reproduction. Working Mother, for instance, wanted $350 to reproduce on of
their covers. Magnum Photos "would bargain down" to $500 to reproduce
Sebastiao Salgado's piece on gold mining in Brazil from the New York Times
Magazine. The New York Times want $150 to reproduce one of their front
pages. KRTN asks $64 to reproduce one of their information graphics. When
your entire permissions budget is $4000 for an estimated 350 external
illustrations, and any permissions fees over that come out of your royalties,
that becomes the primary motivator in editing.
    * Unreasonable print run standards - Time-Life has a fee schedule
that bears no relationship to the textbook market. They assume a minimum
print run of 40,000 copies, which is an unrealistic textbook first printing,
and a one-half page minimum reproduction size.
    * Byzantine layers of permissions or a lack of authority - Sometimes,
the publisher says yes but the photographer says no. For instance, Rolling
Stone said yes to reproducing a table of contents page by Steve Meisel, who
photographed Tina Turner on that page, said no. Sometimes the ad agency
says yes but the celebrity in the ad says no. Levine, Huntley, Schmidt and
Beaver initially granted permission to reproduce a McCall's ad, but Bette
Midler later didn't want her image in a textbook.
    The labyrinth becomes more complex with the turnover of media
properties. You have to follow the paper trail to find out who owns the
current rights.
    Then, the revised copyright law has confused more than clarified.
Because of the "work for hire" rule, some people are quite sure who owns
what rights. Some claim rights that don't belong to them. Others are timid
and fail to claim rights. Some try to search through the original
negotiations to determine what rights were bought and sold, sometimes
giving up in frustration. For instance, in trying to reproduce a spread from
Mercedes magazine, at one time neither North American Mercedes Co., its
advertising agency, the art agency who designed the magazine nor one of the
photographers claimed any rights to the work. One photographer did claim
rights and that became my access to permission, even though the
advertising agency later came back and said they owned the rights and
wouldn't grant them.
    * Fair comment quandary - Sometimes, copyright holders want to see
the accompanying text. If it's neutral or flattering, you don't worry too
much about the ethical dilemma. If, however, you want to criticize an
illustration, you still have to seek permission. You hope the owners won't
ask you in detail why you want to reproduce it because your critical text
would probably deny you access. Does that mean, then, that fair comment
only is permissible in an academic journal but not in a textbook with a
wider audience, even though some journals are for-profit ventures?
    * Lead time - It easily can take nine months to one year to get final
permission to reproduce an illustration. Add to that the one year production
time in printing a textbook and it means that outside illustrations
necessarily will be two years old, at a minimum. Does that allow for
cutting-edge design examples in a conventional textbook?
    Before signing off on this sound-off, let me say that there were more
good guys than bad in this morality play. My publisher, Wm. C. Brown, showed
courage in deciding to reproduce the complete page from USA Today,
reasoning that the newspaper had full rights to grant permission. Other
name photographers (Clint Clemens), designers (Will Hopkins) and inventive
ad agencies (Fallon McElligott) quickly and willingly gave permission to
reproduce their materials for free. They felt they wanted to be in a textbook
environment and that they had a duty to contribute to the education of
future practitioners. Student access to information wouldn't be as much of a
problem if all people in the permissions game were like them.
*********************************************************
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One last pitch for the pre-convention teaching workshop
 
Please join us in Montreal for the 1992 pre-convention workshop, "Getting
Visual Throughout the Curriculum and bring your colleagues! The intent of
this workshop to be held on Tuesday, August 4, 1 to 5 p.m. is to show how
visual communications is important to all the disciplines of journalism and
mass communications. We will examine how both theoretical and practical
applications of visual communication are being incorporated into courses in
magazine, newspaper, advertising, public relations and broadcasting. Master
teachers from these areas including Sandra Moriarty of Colorado, Patricia
Prijatel of Drake, Paul Steinle of Miami (Florida), Marilyn Kern-Foxworth of
Texas A&M and Pegie Stark of The Poynter Institute will share their
methods with us as part of the workshop. Specific projects, assignments
and lectures incorporating visual communication will be discussed.
    AEJMC President Terry Hynes will open the workshop and our keynote
speaker will be Hal Glicksman, associate director of the Center for the
Educational Applications of Brain Hemisphere Research (Brain-Ed Center) at
California State University, Long Beach. The Center is based on the work of
Dr. Betty Edwards, author of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.
Glicksman also teaches drawing on the Macintosh at Long Beach and has been
director of the Art Galleries at the Otis Art Institute, the University of
California, Irvine, Pomona College and the associate director at the
Corcoran Gallery of Art. He has also written a series of how-to books on
home computers for teen-age readers and beginning computer users,
published by Datamost Inc.
    Pegie Stark of the Poynter Institute will discuss "Accessing Campus
Visual Resources outside the Communication Program" and all the panelists
will join in a roundtable question and answer session to conclude the
workshop.
    Cost of the workshop is $15. Please join us for this session sponsored
by the Visual Communication division and co-sponsored by the Newspaper,
Advertising, Radio-TV and Magazine divisions. For more information contact
Rob Heller at 615 974-3463.
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Ethical issues everyone asks about
 
    Inspired by an ethics seminar at the Poynter Institute for Media
Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida and with the help of the NPPA, Chris
Harris of Middle Tennessee State University edited the publication, Protocol
devoted to ethical concerns photojournalists must confront.  The publication
gives readers a chance to read such heavyweights as Deni Elliott, Don
Tomlinson, Lou Hodges, Jay Black, Bob Steele and Sherman Gessert.  Articles
cover the subjects of deception  in imagery, the legal and ethical problems
of picture manipulations, and a practical guideline for solving complicated
ethical dilemmas. Pick up a free copy at the Montreal convention or by mail
through the AEJMC main office.
    The Center for Creative Imaging in Camden, Maine has published a
transcript of a recent symposium titled, "Ethics, Copyright, and the Bottom
Line."  Among others, John Sculley, Ray DeMoulin and Fred Ritchin tackle
another set of tough issues all of those concerned with visual imagery
should think about.  Dr. John Garrett, Director for Information Resources of
the Corporation for National Research Initiatives summed up his thoughts on
ethical  and legal  concerns with, "We need to create an ethical context that
exceeds the legal context. If we depend solely upon the legal context, then
we are absolutely lost." Call Russ Sparkman  (207 236-7400) to order a
copy and get a catalog of all of its excellent course offerings.
*********************************************************
*********************************************************
More visual communication research in 1991
Keith Kenney
Research Chair
 
This article continues to identify and review research published in 1991
that I think would interest Visual Communication division members.
    I would really like to see more quality research done in the visual
communication area.  To increase the volume of research, we need to train
people.  Few schools are training people to become scholars in the visual
area.  It appears that Annenberg and U. Texas are the exceptions.  In my four
years at U. South Carolina, only one person has done a thesis in the visual
area.  Those of you teaching a graduate seminar in visual communication are
lucky.
    Anyway, in order to train people, we need courses and to have
courses, we need strong theories.  Right now, we are probably working in an
atheoretical area.  Maybe we should look at visual perception, cognitive
processing and schema theories.  I hope the VisCom division will lead in
developing visual communication theories and also help set the research
agenda for the future.  It is too bad that Doris Graber will be in South Africa
during the AEJMC convention.  She would have contributed a lot to the
"Research Issues in Visual Communication" panel.
    I think that creating a VisCom journal could help us develop research
in the visual communication area.  It would create a community of scholars
and spur scholarship.  As Jeffrey Johns noted, right now VisCom research is
scattered among many journals.
    I agree (with Sandra Moriarty  Colorado) that we should associate
with a publisher such as Lawrence Erlbaum or Sage.  I agree that we should
start with a research annual and then become a quarterly journal.  I agree
we must convince publishers that there are enough people interested in
visual communication research.  I agree we should affiliate with other
groups in order to grow and create a journal.  Sandra mentioned the Visual
Communication group, but I'm not aware of them.  I've just become a
member of the International Visual Literacy Assoc., which produces The
Journal of Visual Literacy.  I know that SCA has a group active in the visual
area.  I'm not sure about ICA.  [ICA has no visual communication interest
group. Ed.]  Other possible groups that might be interested in "our" new
journal:  the Visual Studies Workshop, which produces Afterimage; readers
of History of Photography, the Society of Photographic Education, which
produces Exposure, the Society for Visual Anthropology, which produces
Visual Anthropology, National Press Photographers Assoc., which produces
News Photographer, and Society of Newspaper Design, which produces
Design.
    Some good news is that Visual Anthropology has been publishing
visual theory and methodology articles for the past four years.  "Visual
Anthropology promotes ethnographic filming, the use of media in cultural
feedback, and the development of Third World ethnographic media
productions.  The journal fosters discussion of the study, use and production
of anthropological and ethnographic films, videos and photographs for
research and teaching.  Great attention is paid to the analysis of visual
symbolic forms in a cultural-historical framework and the structuring of
reality as evidenced by visual productions and artifacts, including the
cross-cultural study of art and artifacts from socio-cultural, historical and
aesthetic points of view."
    In "Photography as a Research Tool," vol. 4 (1991), pp. 193-216,
Wilbert Reuben Norman, Jr. uses four methodological approaches to
qualitative research--participant observation, the ethnographic interview,
photographic documentation, and the projective interview--to study the
Centenary United Methodist Church community.  Twenty-one photographs are
included with the text.  Norman suggests researchers "understand
community events through the interaction between visual research data and
community informants."
    Another journal that sometimes includes photographic research with
an ethnographic slant is Journal of Consumer Research.  Ronald P. Hill's
article, "Homeless Women, Special Possessions, and the Meaning of "Home":
An Ethnographic Case Study," vol. 18 (December 1991): 298-310; includes
four photographs as part of the ethnographic case study of a shelter for
homeless women run by an order of Roman Catholic sisters.  Deborah D.
Heisley and Sidney J. Levy's article, "Autodriving: A Photoelicitation
Technique," in the same issue, contains six photos and an extensive
bibliography about the antecedents and values of visual research.
"Autodriving" means that an interview is "driven" by people who are seeing
and hearing their own behavior.  People were encouraged to comment on
their consumption behavior as represented by photographs and recordings.
Photos were found to encourage people's need to explain themselves.  In
June, this journal published "Picture-based Persuasion Processes and the
Moderating Role of Involvement," by Paul W. Miniard et. al.  This study
continues research about how effective photographs are in persuading
people to buy products.
    Another journal that publishes research concerning visual
communication is Word & Image.  In "Comic Strips and Theories of
Communication," vol. 5 (April-June 1989): 173-180, Richard J. Watts writes
that a narrow semiotic approach is not sufficient to understand what
happens when comic strips are read and interpreted.  A wider, inferential
approach is needed to explain how people understand non-coded meaning.  He
believes this meaning comes from our shared knowledge of the world.
    Of course, Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media frequently
publishes research concerning visual communication.  See Esther Thorson et
al., "Effects of Issue-Image Strategies, Attack and Support Appeals, Music,
and Visual Content in Political Commercials," vol. 35, (Fall 1991): 465-486.
The authors manipulate four significant dimensions of political advertising
content in order to examine the impact of each dimension and of their
interactions.  One of the dimensions was whether the visual content showed
the candidate in the context of his family or performing his professional
campaign activities.  Family visuals produced more positive attitudes
towards candidates' character, and professional visuals produced more
positive attitudes towards their abilities.
    I look at Historical Journal of Film, Radio, TV for historical research
concerning film and television.  See "Doctoral Dissertations on Film, Radio
and Television," vol. 11, no. 3 (1991).
    The four separate journals under the heading Journal of Experimental
Psychology occasionally publish experimental research of interest to visual
communication scholars.  Two interesting recent articles in Human
Perception & Performance are: Mary A. Peterson, Erin M. Harvey and Hollis J.
Weidenbacher, "Shape Recognition Contributions to Figure-Ground Reversal:
Which Route Counts?" vol. 17 (November 1991): 1075-1089; and Patricia R.
DeLucia, "Pictorial and Motion-Based Information for Depth Perception," vol.
17, (August 1991): 749-761.  The following journals also publish articles
concerning the recognition, understanding and memory of visual images:
Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, Memory and Cognition, and
Journal of Educational Television.
    Unfortunately, I was not able to review 1991 articles in the following
journals because they are not purchased by USC libraries.  You may, however,
wish to see if your library subscribes, or you may contact the journals'
editors directly.  Designer is a publication of the University and College
Designer's Assoc., 2811 Mishawaka Ave., South Bend, IN  46615.  Information
Design Journal has a circulation of 700, and editor Robert Waller may be
contacted at P.O. Box 185, Milton Keynes MK7 6BL, ENGLAND.  The Journal of
Visual Literacy is published by the International Visual Literacy Assoc.
Sandra Moriarty writes that its membership is mostly from education
(instructional technology), but a few members are mass comm scholars.
Although it is a small, sporadic journal, she writes, it has some really
interesting work.  Contact editor Ann DeVaney, University of Wisconsin, 225
N. Mills St., Madison, WI  53706.
    Journal of Communication Inquiry  occasionally publishes photographs
and articles about visual communication.  In 1990, vol. 14, no. 2 issue was
devoted to visual communication.  Contact the editor at 205
Communications Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA  52242.  The
History of Photography is published quarterly, costs $50, and is available
from Taylor & Francis, 242 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA  19106.  A year's
subscription (four issues) to Aperture costs $36 and is available from 20
East 23rd Street, New York, NY  10010.  Exposure covers serious issues in
fine-art photography from criticism to history.  Write Box BBB,
Albuquerque, NM 87196.  Visible Language is concerned with typography.
The quarterly publication has a circulation of 1,200 and 96-144 pages per
issue.
    See The Iowa Guide: Scholarly Journals in Mass Communication and
Related Fields, 4th ed. compiled by Carolyn S. Dyer and Ana C. Garner (Iowa
City: Univ. of Iowa, 1991), for the editors' addresses and for information
about other journals.  Cost is $10.
    Between the February article and this article, I identified articles
that would interest visual communication scholars in 14 journals.
Photographs appeared in three journals:  Visual Anthropology, Journal of
Consumer Research, and Historical Journal of Film, Radio, TV.  Few of the
articles, however, concerned theory of visual communication.  To respond to
Jeffrey John's recent article in ViewPoints, given everyone's limited
budget, the one journal that appears essential reading is Visual
Anthropology because the people who contribute to this journal are aware of
Sol Worth, Roland Barthes and Sergei Eisenstein.
    ***The "Research Issues in Visual Communication" panel at the
AEJMC convention should also help identify appropriate theories and
methodologies.  I've asked Larry Gross from the Annenberg School for
Communication to talk about theories of visual communication.  Pamela
Shoemaker, director of the School of Journalism at Ohio State University,
will discuss ten important research questions facing visual communication
scholars.  Jay Black, editor of the Journal of Mass Media Ethics, will also
suggest a research agenda for visual communication scholars.  Finally, Jim
Tankard, editor of Journalism Monographs, will moderate this session,
which is co-sponsored by the Theory & Methodology Division.  I hope we have
a good turnout on Thursday, August 6, from 1:30 to 3:30.
    In the 1990 Journalism Abstracts, the following dissertations may
interest VisCom scholars:  Jeffrey John, "An Analysis of Visual Reference
Associations in Television News Coverage of the 1988 U.S. Presidential
Election Campaign," Ohio Univ., 1990; John Newhagen, "This Evening's Bad
News: Effects of Compelling Negative Television News Images on Memory,"
Stanford Univ., 1990; Frank Biocca, "Reading the Video Screen: Psychological
Measurement of Spatial Attention and Perceptual Asymmetries Within
Television, Video and Computer Monitors," Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison,
1990; Suren Lalvani, "Photography and the Body in the Nineteenth Century,"
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990; and Wayne Melanson, "Effects
of Involvement and Communicators' Level of Physical Attractiveness in
Magazine Advertising," Univ. of Tennessee, 1990.
    Master's students at the University of Pennsylvania (six) and
University of Texas-Austin (four) completed the most research in the visual
communication area.  Note the following:  Enoh T. Ebong, "Visual Imagery in
Political Advertisements: An Analysis of Viewers' Interpretations and
Responses," Univ. of Penn., 1990; Cindy I. Zuckerman, "Rugged Cigarettes and
Sexy Soap: Brand Images and the Acquisition of Meaning Through
Associational Juxtaposition of Visual Imagery," Univ. of Penn., 1990; Marc B.
Rubner, "Cameras in the New York State Courtroom: A Critical Analysis of
The new York State Evaluation of Its Trail Period with Audio-Visual
Coverage of Trail Proceedings," Univ. of Penn., 1990; Monique A. Thompson,
"Literal and Symbolic Visuals in Print Advertising," Univ. of Penn., 1990;
Peter R. Head, "Whose Voice? A Case Study in the Making of a
"Representative" Documentary," Univ. of Penn., 1990;   Nadine J. Canter,
"The Use of Landscape Photography in the Environmental Movement: A Triple
Case Study," Univ. of Penn., 1990; Molly Mosley, "Effects of Color and
Program Context on How Commercials are Processed," Univ. of Texas-
Austin, 1990;  Danal Terry, "Digital Imaging Technologies in
Photojournalism: A Baseline Study of Applications, Implications and
Attitudes of a Field in Flux," Univ. of Texas-Austin, 1990; Charles Murray,
"Cultural Maintenance Strategies Among Non Indigenous Mormons in
Northern Chihuahua: A Visual Ethnography," Univ. of Texas-Austin, 1990;
David Thompson, "Effects of Justification and Column Rule on Memory of
Test in Magazines," Univ. of Texas-Austin, 1990; and Kristina L. Vang,
"Nonverbal Behaviors of Presidential Candidates," Univ. of Wyoming, 1990.
    Of course, master's students at other universities undoubtedly wrote
theses related to visual communication.  Some I may have overlooked, but
others were not listed in Journalism Abstracts.  For example, Sandra
Moriarty said that two of her students wrote theses related to visual
communication, but they were not listed, perhaps because the
administration at U. Colorado did not submit the information.  Carl Walston
wrote, "Aesthetic Dimensions of Advertising," and Lisa Rohe wrote,
"Cultural Palette."  If anyone knows of recent theses or dissertations of
interest to our division members, please let me know and we'll list their
names and titles.
*********************************************************
*********************************************************
Your VisCom officers
 
Head: Robert L. Baker
Penn State (on-leave)
101 Woodlawn Circle
Summerville, South Carolina 29485
Phone: 803-873-0679
FAX: 803-554-0183 (be sure to include Bob's phone # on FAX)
lst Vice Head/Montreal Program Chair: Julianne Newton
CMA 6.144, Dept. of Journalism
University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712
Phone: 512-471-1976
 Home phone: 512-444-7316
FAX 512-471-8500
2nd Vice Head/Logo Contest:
Patsy G. Watkins
116 Kimpel, Dept. of Journalism
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701
Phone: 501-575-3601
Home phone: 501-361-2043
PF&R Chair: Jim Kelly
1218 Communication Building
School of Journalism
Southern IL Univ., Carbondale, IL 62958  Phone: 618-453-3278
Home phone: 618-457-4557
Teaching Chair: Jan Colbert
100 Neff Hall, School of Journalism
Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211
Phone: 314-882-2042
Home phone: 314-442-4802
FAX: 314-882-5431
Research Chair: Keith Kenney
College of Journalism
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208
Phone: 803-777-3302
Home phone: 803-782-0104
Special Projects: Danal Terry
Department of Journalism
Southwest Texas State University
San Marcos, Texas 78666
Phone: 512-245-2656
Home phone: 512-396-8434
Newsletter Editor: Paul Lester
School of Communications
California State University
Fullerton, California 92634
VOX1: 714-449-5302
VOX2:714-680-6124
FAX: 714-773-2209
VAX: LESTER@FULLERTON.EDU
Pre-Convention Workshop:
Rob Heller
 330 Communications Building
School of Journalism
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Phone: 615-974-3463
Home phone: 615-694-0011
Membership: Craig Denton
Dept. of Communication
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
Phone: 801-581-5321
Home phone: 801-255-3095
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Jun 1992 09:47:24 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Erik Jul 
Subject:      Re: Scholarly Communications program query
In-Reply-To:  <9206102336.AA05012@rsch.oclc.org>; from "Linda Gould" at Jun 10,
              92 4:41 pm
 
>
> "Libraries are making e-journals available."  We need to know more about
> what libraries are doing with them, and also, whether faculty are using them,
> and if not, why not, and if so, how?   I could give you about 50 issues we
> raised here at UW on this last week.
>
> Linda Gould
> Assoc Director, Library Collections
> Univ. of Wa. Libs.
>
Linda:  I would be interested in receiving your list of issues.
 
Sincerely,
 
Erik Jul, Communications Manager
Office of Research
OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.
 
ekj@rsch.oclc.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Jun 1992 16:39:45 -0700
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was
              ljgould@MILTON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU
From:         Linda Gould 
Subject:      Re: Scholarly Communications program query
In-Reply-To:  <9206121350.AA24325@milton.u.washington.edu>
 
I think I started something I didn't mean to and had better clarify before
this gets out of hand.
 
 I am willing to send such a list (perhaps on
e-mail) after it is compiled.  The issues I referred to were raised by
members of our staff in a program Elaine Martin of our Health Sciences
Library and I planned as the first in a series (future ones next year) on
e-journals.
 
 The  intent of this first program was to try to bring everyone
up to a baseline level of understanding about the multitude of complicated
issues related to e-journals - pointing out that dealing with them is
confounded by traditional organizational structures within which most of
us are still operating.  So, there were speakers who raised issues from
the point of view of Tech Services, Public Services, Collection
Development, and Systems. We demo-d several, and then 3 librarians who
read e-journals talked about their experiences.  We asked attendees what
they wanted us to focus on next.
 
So, when I said I "could give you 50...," that may have been hyperbolic, since
 the list has not yet been compiled and I'm unsure of the final count!
 
.
And it will not be compiled before ALA.  It's hard to imagine that we would
have come up with anything here in the way of issues, problems, and questions
that every other library still grappling with how to handle these has not
recognized.  But there are too few examples out there of how libraries have
begun practically to address them, and that's why I expressed preference
for that topic to be addressed at ALA.
 
I will continue compiling the list and will get it to anyone who asks for
it.
 
 
 On Fri, 12 Jun 1992, Erik Jul wrote:
 
> >
> > "Libraries are making e-journals available."  We need to know more about
> > what libraries are doing with them, and also, whether faculty are using
 them,
> > and if not, why not, and if so, how?   I could give you about 50 issues we
> > raised here at UW on this last week.
> >
> > Linda Gould
> > Assoc Director, Library Collections
> > Univ. of Wa. Libs.
> >
> Linda:  I would be interested in receiving your list of issues.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Erik Jul, Communications Manager
> Office of Research
> OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.
>
> ekj@rsch.oclc.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 13 Jun 1992 08:10:17 CDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Charles Bailey, University of Houston" 
Subject:      Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials Article
 
+ Page 1 +
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
            The Public-Access Computer Systems Review
 
Volume 3, Number 2 (1992)                          ISSN 1048-6542
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
To retrieve an article file as an e-mail message, send the GET
command given after the article information to LISTSERV@UHUPVM1
(BITNET) or LISTSERV@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU (Internet).  To retrieve the
article as a file, omit "F=MAIL" from the end of the GET command.
 
 
                            CONTENTS
 
COMMUNICATIONS
 
The Development of a Graphical User Interface for The Online
Journal of Current Clinical Trials
 
     By Thomas B. Hickey and Terry Noreault (pp. 4-12)
 
     To retrieve this file: GET HICKEY PRV3N2 F=MAIL
 
Electronic Publishing on Networks: A Selective Bibliography of
Recent Works
 
     By Charles W. Bailey, Jr. (pp. 13-20)
 
     To retrieve this file: GET BAILEY PRV3N2 F=MAIL
 
COLUMNS
 
Recursive Reviews
 
     Artificial Intelligence, Libraries, and Information
     Retrieval
 
     By Martin Halbert (pp. 21-28)
 
     To retrieve this file: GET HALBERT PRV3N2 F=MAIL
 
REVIEWS
 
Library Resources on the Internet: Strategies for Selection and
Use
 
     Reviewed by Caroline R. Arms (pp. 29-34)
 
     To retrieve this file: GET ARMS PRV3N2 F=MAIL
 
+ Page 2 +
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
            The Public-Access Computer Systems Review
 
Editor-in-Chief
 
Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
University Libraries
University of Houston
Houston, TX 77204-2091
(713) 743-9804
LIB3@UHUPVM1 (BITNET) or LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU (Internet)
 
Associate Editors
 
Columns: Leslie Pearse, OCLC
Communications: Dana Rooks, University of Houston
Reviews: Roy Tennant, University of California, Berkeley
 
Editorial Board
 
Ralph Alberico, University of Texas, Austin
George H. Brett II, University of North Carolina
     General Administration
Steve Cisler, Apple
Walt Crawford, Research Libraries Group
Lorcan Dempsey, University of Bath
Nancy Evans, Pennsylvania State University, Ogontz
Charles Hildreth, READ Ltd.
Ronald Larsen, University of Maryland
Clifford Lynch, Division of Library Automation,
     University of California
David R. McDonald, Tufts University
R. Bruce Miller, University of California, San Diego
Paul Evan Peters, Coalition for Networked Information
Mike Ridley, University of Waterloo
Peggy Seiden, Pennsylvania State University, New Kensington
Peter Stone, University of Sussex
John E. Ulmschneider, North Carolina State University
 
Publication Information
 
Published on an irregular basis by the University Libraries,
University of Houston.  Technical support is provided by the
Information Technology Division, University of Houston.
Circulation: 4,130 subscribers in 45 countries (PACS-L) and 314
subscribers in 27 countries (PACS-P).
 
+ Page 3 +
 
Back issues are available from LISTSERV@UHUPVM1 (BITNET) or
LISTSERV@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU (Internet).  To obtain a list of all
available files, send the following e-mail message to the
LISTSERV: INDEX PACS-L.  The name of each issue's table of
contents file begins with the word "CONTENTS."
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is an electronic
journal that is distributed on BITNET, Internet, and other
computer networks.  There is no subscription fee.
     To subscribe, send an e-mail message to LISTSERV@UHUPVM1
(BITNET) or LISTSERV@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU (Internet) that says:
SUBSCRIBE PACS-P First Name Last Name.  PACS-P subscribers also
receive two electronic newsletters: Current Cites and Public-
Access Computer Systems News.
     The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is Copyright (C)
1992 by the University Libraries, University of Houston.  All
Rights Reserved.
     Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computer
conferences, individual scholars, and libraries.  Libraries are
authorized to add the journal to their collection, in electronic
or printed form, at no charge.  This message must appear on all
copied material.  All commercial use requires permission.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Sun, 14 Jun 1992 10:02:02 CDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Robin Cover 
Subject:      SGML used in Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials
 
(cross-posted from Usenet comp.text.sgml)
 
I ran across an interesting article on the use of SGML in the
electronic Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials (CCT)</>,
developed by OCLC.  The network address for the article is given
at the end of this poster for anyone who wishes to see the full text.
Two excerpts and one reference follow here.
 
<quote>
1.0  Introduction
 
The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials (CCT) is a peer-
reviewed, interactive electronic journal.  The primary form of
publication is electronic--no paper version of the journal is
planned.  In addition to the full text of articles, CCT includes
tables, equations, and graphics. . .
</quote>
 
<quote>
6.0  Database Construction
 
Articles are peer reviewed using a bulletin board system at AAAS,
to which all the editors and reviewers have dial-up access.  One
of the goals of AAAS is to reduce the time taken to publish
articles as much as possible without sacrificing the rigor of the
peer-review process.
 
[. . .                      After an article is accepted, AAAS
sends to OCLC (via the bulletin board system) an SGML version of
the article and the original graphics (if they are not machine
readable, they may have to be physically mailed).  OCLC then
completes the SGML markup--in particular, OCLC completes the
tagging of tables and equations as well as a number of other
details.  Currently, this tagging is done manually.
     After the SGML tagging of the article is completed and
validated, the figures are scanned and the article is typeset.
We are using TeX for this, so the SGML file is run through a
program to convert it into TeX and format it.  The resulting
output is reviewed.  After the output looks acceptable, it is
faxed to both AAAS and the author for review, any needed changes
are incorporated, and the database is built.
 
     Although we realize that this is ambitious, our goal is to
have articles available within 24 hours of their acceptance.  To
accomplish this, we need to be able to finish the SGML coding and
formatting within six hours, and to have the formatting reviewed
by AAAS and the author within two hours.  The article will then
be loaded into the database overnight.  Even if this schedule is
not met, we will have the information available to users within
days of acceptance rather than the weeks or months that paper
journals require.
</quote>
 
<references>
References and Notes
. . .
 
2. Thomas B. Hickey, "Using SGML and TeX for an Interactive
Chemical Encyclopedia," in Proceedings of the 1989 National
Online Meeting (Medford, NJ: Learned Information, 1989), 187-195.
</references>
 
<biblio.for.current.article>
Hickey, Thomas B., and Terry Noreault. "The Development of a
Graphical User Interface for The Online Journal of Current
Clinical Trials."  The Public-Access Computer Systems Review 3,
no. 2 (1992): 4-12.  (To retrieve this article, send an e-mail
message that says "GET HICKEY PRV3N2 F=MAIL" to LISTSERV@UHUPVM1
or LISTSERV@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU.)
</>
 
Submitted by Robin Cover
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Robin Cover              BITNET:   zrcc1001@smuvm1  ("one-zero-zero-one")
6634 Sarah Drive         Internet: robin@utafll.uta.edu  ("uta-ef-el-el")
Dallas, TX  75236  USA   Internet: zrcc1001@vm.cis.smu.edu
Tel: (1 214) 296-1783    Internet: robin@ling.uta.edu
FAX: (1 214) 709-3387    Internet: robin@txsil.sil.org
=========================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 19 Jun 1992 09:34:00 PST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Sally Hambridge, SC1-2, 765-2931" <HAMBRIDGE@SC.INTEL.COM>
Subject:      Postscript to SGML
 
Does anyone have information about a Postscript to SGML converter?  Is
anything like this available through anonymous ftp?
 
I do not know if the List would be interested, so please respond directly to
me.
 
Thanks,
Sally Hambridge
Intel Corp.
Internet: Hambridge@delphi.intel.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 22 Jun 1992 20:30:59 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         mgeller@ATHENA.MIT.EDU
Subject:      "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
 
We have recently run into a problem with library subscriptions to
ejournals/.  In the last month, a few "non-article" messages have been
sent to subscribers for some of these ejournals/.  From the header
information, these messages appear to be part of the journal, but in
fact they aren't.  They are generally informative notices _about_ the
journal, e.g. possible numbering patterns, calls for papers or book
reviewers, etc.  The problem is that they are received in our
acquisitions department like journal articles.  Should they be
archived here at MIT with the rest of the journal?  In some cases,
they obviously should not be.  In other cases, it's not quite so
clear.  But it certainly isn't the jurisdiction of the acquisitions
staff to decide whether or not a message that comes in as part of a
subscription should be archived.  It is more appropriately the
selector's decision, but this will add another step to the processing
procedures.
 
How are other libraries handling these "non-article" messages?  Do
publishers understand what they're doing by sending these messages to
the list?  Is it possible to establish standard patterns for epublishers
to use for sending "non-article" messages to their subscribers?
 
Marilyn Geller
MIT Libraries
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 22 Jun 1992 21:03:17 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         James Powell <JPOWELL@VTVM1.BITNET>
Subject:      WordPerfect/SGML
 
News Release   WordPerfect Corporation
WordPerfect Corporation Announces Development For SGML
 
OREM, Utah, March 31, 1992 -- WordPerfect Corporation today announces the
development of WordPerfect MarkUp, a conversion process between WordPerfect's
5.1 file format and SGML.  WordPerfect MarkUp has been under development for
one year, and is expected to go into beta by the third quarter of 1992.
     "WordPerfect MarkUp is designed to be the best bridge possible between
WordPerfect word processing and SGML.  This product will satisfy most
customers' SGML requirements and allows them to continue using the WordPerfect
5.1 word processor," said project manager, Dallas Powell.
     The user interface for WordPerfect MarkUp is a simple editing environment
which resembles that of WordPerfect.  Text attributes such as bold, underline,
and center are maintained in order to preserve the document's visual appearance
and facilitate tagging.
     An interactive validator is included which is based on the reference
concrete syntax and supports the OMITTAG features of SGML.  Validation is not
limited to a specific set of Document Type Definitions (DTDs), but can also
deal with user-supplied DTDs.  The validator informs the user of the currently
open element and any errors which have been generated.
     Several methods of tag insertion are supported.  One of these is a pre-
tagging process which can be executed in a batch mode or interactively.  It
inserts tags into a WordPerfect 5.1 document based on a set of user-defined
rules.  The effectiveness of the pre-tagger is dependent on the consistency
of the WordPerfect format codes in the document.  This process does not
currently support the automatic specifications of SGML attributes in the
inserted tags.
     Various menus allow the interactive insertion of tags and attribute
values.  While tags may be inserted in any order, a "what's valid next" feature
may be used to reduce errors.  When an error is selected from the supplied
list, the cursor will be placed at the position in the document where the
error occurred.
     Documents can be saved either in WordPerfect 5.1 file format or as an SGML
text file.  The WordPerfect file can be retrieved back into the standard
WordPerfect 5.1 word processor to allow printing, spell checking, etc.  Any
tags in the document are not deleted, but are preserved as function codes which
have no effect until brought back into WordPerfect MarkUp.
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU                                   O+>
             >>> jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 23 Jun 1992 00:23:39 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Trisha Davis <tdavis@MAGNUS.ACS.OHIO-STATE.EDU>
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
In-Reply-To:  <9206230034.AA26415@quark.magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu>; from
              "mgeller@ATHENA.MIT.EDU" at Jun 22, 92 8:30 pm
 
Sheryl, are you on this list?  Please advise this rusty brain... I am sure I
have asked this question before, and promptly forgot the answer!  Trisha
>
> We have recently run into a problem with library subscriptions to
> ejournals/.  In the last month, a few "non-article" messages have been
> sent to subscribers for some of these ejournals/.  From the header
> information, these messages appear to be part of the journal, but in
> fact they aren't.  They are generally informative notices _about_ the
> journal, e.g. possible numbering patterns, calls for papers or book
> reviewers, etc.  The problem is that they are received in our
> acquisitions department like journal articles.  Should they be
> archived here at MIT with the rest of the journal?  In some cases,
> they obviously should not be.  In other cases, it's not quite so
> clear.  But it certainly isn't the jurisdiction of the acquisitions
> staff to decide whether or not a message that comes in as part of a
> subscription should be archived.  It is more appropriately the
> selector's decision, but this will add another step to the processing
> procedures.
>
> How are other libraries handling these "non-article" messages?  Do
> publishers understand what they're doing by sending these messages to
> the list?  Is it possible to establish standard patterns for epublishers
> to use for sending "non-article" messages to their subscribers?
>
> Marilyn Geller
> MIT Libraries
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 23 Jun 1992 06:07:24 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         dkyburz@TECHDATA.COM
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
 
>How are other libraries handling these "non-article" messages?
 
How about establishing another list? Several other groups add a "-d" to
the existing list name for a discussion group, where they talk about
whatever the main list is about. Announcements and discussion about the
articles could be handled in the "-d" list, while the main list was
limited to the actual articles themselves.
----------
Dan Kyburz, CCP, CDP, CNE | 5777 Myer Lake Cir    | ...uunet!techdata!dkyburz
Network Support Engineer  | Clearwater, FL  34620 | CIS: 70540,2061
Tech Data Corp            | dkyburz@techdata.com  | MHS: dkyburz@techdata
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 23 Jun 1992 09:35:00 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         BURNET@ZODIAC.BITNET
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
 
Marilyn Geller's questions about "non-article" ejournal messages raises
some interesting issues.  I think we should recognize that much of
what she is talking about is in fact the sort of thing one might
expect to appear somewhere "else" in a traditional print journal, i.e.,
calls for papers, reviewers, etc. might normally be found in a print
journal, so probably should be archived with the ejournal.  Messages
about numbering patterns are another issue.  I used to subscribe to
PMC-Talk. This separate list handled that kind of messages for PMC
and might serve as a model for other ejournals/ as well.
 
Kathleen Burnett
burnet@zodiac.rutgers.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 23 Jun 1992 12:54:48 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stevan Harnad <harnad@PRINCETON.EDU>
Subject:      Re:  "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
 
Non-archival material should be clearly distinguished from archiival
material with headings so libraries can know what to save and
what to discard. Archival issues of PSYCOLOQUY have the full
PSYC logo. Newsletters and miscellaneous postings do not.
Stevan Harnad
Co-Editor, PSYCOLOQUY
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 23 Jun 1992 20:45:46 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         mgeller@ATHENA.MIT.EDU
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
In-Reply-To:  Your message of Tue,
              23 Jun 92 12:54:48 -0400. <9206231706.AA14904@Athena.MIT.EDU>
 
Stevan Harnad writes that "Archival issues of Psycoloquy have full
PSYC logo.  Newsletters and miscellaneous postings do not."  Clearly,
the Newsletter sections and some of these miscellaneous postings ought
to be available to library patrons.  Whether we save them by archiving
or clear them out of the database periodically (I can hear all the
librarians groaning at this idea!) is a separate matter.  So, when
these files come in on our library subscription, whether they have
PSYC logo or not, they should be kept and passed on to reside with the
other Psycoloquy files.  But then, there are the miscellaneous
postings, such as the Thu, 4 Jun 1992 message re: If you leave for the
summer ...  Since patrons will be accessing Psycoloquy through a WAIS
client-server at MIT instead of accessing it through a personal
subscription, they clearly don't need this message.  And, what about
the Sat, 6 Jun 1992 message re: Multiple Electronic Book Reviews?
Should patrons see this message?  This is really a gray area.  The
decision ought not to be put on the serials check in staff (and we
haven't even touched on the issue of how this staff would identify
these miscellaneous messages on their check-in records!).
 
Do other publishers like the idea of an associated list for
information _about_ their journals?  Are there other options?  How are
other libraries currently deciding what to pass on to thier patrons
and what to deal with as "publisher correspondence"?
 
Marilyn Geller
MIT Libraries
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 00:07:30 -0400
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         Edward Vielmetti <emv@MSEN.COM>
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
 
There's something to be said for keeping timely, repetetive, or
administrative information separate from the main journal articles,
both for presentation to the user as they are browsing through back
issues or as they are running searches on indexes to collections.
At the very least, you deserve to keep the "call for papers",
"frequently asked questions", and "instructions to readers" sections
out of the main index because they will probably goof up perfectly
good searches with a lot of noise words.  Separating the refereed
from the non-refereed sections and placing them far enough apart
that readers notice the difference is good policy.
 
I guess I disagree with the notion that ephemera associated with a real
list should be purged from disk and never used or seen again.
The record of the production process may be noise now but in
time (10, 20 years?) it will be an important part of a historical
record.  Save the scraps, put them in a box, and seal it away, we're
too early in the process to throw out the record of what we're doing.
 
Edward Vielmetti, vice president for research, Msen Inc. emv@Msen.com
      Msen Inc., 628 Brooks, Ann Arbor MI  48103 +1 313 741 1120
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 08:10:58 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Howard Pasternack <BLIPS15@BROWNVM.BITNET>
Subject:      Re: 'Non-article' messages in ejournals/
 
This discussion points to one of the major issues with electronic
publications -- the authentication issue.  With the current technology,
how does a user know that the complete text of a publication is on
hand and that the text being viewed has not been unintentially or
intentially altered.
 
Howard Pasternack
Brown University
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 09:09:08 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stu Weibel <stu@RSCH.OCLC.ORG>
Subject:      authentication of E-Journals
 
The burden of authentication of completeness of a volume of an
E-journal must not be allowed to fall upon the subscriber, either
individual or institutional.  Electronic publishers must provide an
automatic means to verify the electronic contents of publishing units.
 
This problem goes away, however, if the E-journal becomes a database
rather than a collection of files, and <flame_bait> this is almost
certainly how things will develop </flame_bait>.  Subscribers will
retrieve articles from a certified central journal server that is
maintained by an agency responsible for providing access... OCLC, a
campus-wide network, Dialog, whomever.
 
Such agencies know how to maintain files (whatever one's complaints
about them, loss or corruption of records is not generally a problem).
 
Stuart Weibel
OCLC Office of Research
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 09:24:45 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Harry M. Kriz" <KRIZ@VTVM1.BITNET>
Subject:      Re: authentication of E-Journals
In-Reply-To:  Message of Wed, 24 Jun 1992 09:09:08 EDT from <stu@RSCH.OCLC.ORG>
 
Having spent many hours verifying the accuracy of citations and the
contents of articles by going to the original article as printed (whether
held locally or available elsewhere) I also am very concerned
about the authentication of article contents.
 
Even neglecting the possibility of the centralized authorized journal
supplier changing the contents of a journal database when things are
said that are not to the supplier's liking, we still have the problem
of the agency's ability and willingness to maintain the authorized
files for a suitable length of time.  Having read reports that the
National Archives cannot read the only copies of data from 20 years ago,
I am reluctant to entrust the historical, literary, and scientific
record to a single authorized source.
 
In general it has been found that the integrity of records is
best preserved by spreading those records around in non-volatile forms.
 
--Harry
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Harry M. Kriz            KRIZ@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU  PHONE: (703)231-7052
Automation Librarian     University Libraries
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
Blacksburg, VA, 24061-0434
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 11:01:53 -0400
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         KOWNACKI@VTVM1.BITNET
Subject:      authentication of E-Journals
 
 *** Reply to note of 06/24/92 09:10
 
 I think Stu Weibul is absolutely right in his statement as to how e-journals
 should and will likely evolve. Most of the problems that seem so confusing and
 unsolvable such as preserving the "authentic text" and protecting copyright,
 will disappear when we stop modelling electronic journals after the procedures
 we've developed for print publications and start thinking instead of
 electronic databases of articles that are accessible on demand.
 
 The only question is whether these archival databases will be developed by
 universities and nonprofit organizations or by the big for-profit players. As
 the latter seem much more interested in moving in this direction, I suspect
 we'll soon (within 5 years) be purchasing much of our information on a per
 piece basis from centralized databases offered by various commercial
 publishers or perhaps through a centralized distributor such as OCLC. This
 would not be a bad development as it would allow much more convenient and
 efficient retrieval of information, but it will likely be just as expensive
 as the current situation.
 
 Imagine the alternative:  10,000 unique electronic journals each with its
 own address, distribution procedures, and other peculiarities.  We may be
 able to handle such a future with fancy software such as electronic agents
 or extensions of W.A.I.S. type software, but why not move toward a much
 simpler model of accessible archival databases of articles?  I've already
 posted a much longer argument for this that I'd be happy to forward to
 anyone on request.
 
 Bill Kownacki
 VPI & SU
 kownacki@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 10:39:35 CDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Raleigh C. Muns" <SRCMUNS@UMSLVMA.BITNET>
Subject:      Re: Authentication of ejournals/
In-Reply-To:  Message of Wed, 24 Jun 1992 08:10:58 EDT from <BLIPS15@BROWNVM>
 
Having taken a course in analytical bibliography within the last couple
of years, I find that the problem of authentication of e-journals (i.e.,
which "version" does one have) is little different from the problems
of authenticating versions of print items. I spent two weeks looking
at different versions of Papal Canones and the best I could do was
support various contentions as to the degree of authenticity of the
item.
 
The major difference is one of magnitude. With e-publishing, practically
anyone can download, modify, and republish a new version of an item,
therefore the probability (and problems) of different versions increase.
Also, there are less cues (e.g., water marks on the paper, font of type)
to support analysis in the electronic version.
 
As in print forms, the controlling structures of the publishing industry
as well as conventions adopted by individual publishers (fraud aside)
can be used to aid in authenticattion of an "edition" of an item. ISSN's
for e-journals can aid in this process. Likewise, depositories which
contain "originals" such as the Library of Congress can also verify
authenticity or version or edition or printing of an item.
 
I say with affection that the process of analytical bibliography is the
most anally retentive activity of an anal retentive profession (librarian-
ship) and am pleased that such a fascinating activity has a role in the
electronic forums of the future (scratch that!) present.
 
 
Raleigh C. Muns / Reference Librarian / Univ. of MO, St. Louis
 
BITNET: SRCMUNS@UMSLVMA
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 17:36:15 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude <guedon@ERE.UMONTREAL.CA>
Subject:      Re: Authentication of ejournals/
In-Reply-To:  <9206241549.AA24491@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA>; from "Raleigh C.
              Muns" at Jun 24, 92 10:39 am
 
>
> Having taken a course in analytical bibliography within the last couple
> of years, I find that the problem of authentication of e-journals (i.e.,
> which "version" does one have) is little different from the problems
> of authenticating versions of print items. I spent two weeks looking
> at different versions of Papal Canones and the best I could do was
> support various contentions as to the degree of authenticity of the
> item.
>
> The major difference is one of magnitude. With e-publishing, practically
> anyone can download, modify, and republish a new version of an item,
> therefore the probability (and problems) of different versions increase.
> Also, there are less cues (e.g., water marks on the paper, font of type)
> to support analysis in the electronic version.
>
> As in print forms, the controlling structures of the publishing industry
> as well as conventions adopted by individual publishers (fraud aside)
> can be used to aid in authenticattion of an "edition" of an item. ISSN's
> for e-journals can aid in this process. Likewise, depositories which
> contain "originals" such as the Library of Congress can also verify
> authenticity or version or edition or printing of an item.
>
> I say with affection that the process of analytical bibliography is the
> most anally retentive activity of an anal retentive profession (librarian-
> ship) and am pleased that such a fascinating activity has a role in the
> electronic forums of the future (scratch that!) present.
>
>
> Raleigh C. Muns / Reference Librarian / Univ. of MO, St. Louis
>
> BITNET: SRCMUNS@UMSLVMA
>
In our project Surfaces - a research service on cultural studies,
we have looked into two questions: integrity of texts published
and possibility of having succeeding versions of the same article.
With regard to the latter question, we believe that each modification
to a given article should undergo a refereeing process similar to
the one used with the first submission, only lighter (only one
referee for example). As for integrity of texts, the Macintosh
text kept at our ftp site (harfang.cc.umontreal.ca) is the standard
reference. Now, in the next few months, we hope to encode our texts with
an algorithm that will allow for quick, on the spot checking without
having to go back to the site and do a clean download if the text
did not reach you directly in the first place.
This may not be as good as water marks, but this is the best we
can think of for the moment.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
co-editor Surfaces
guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 24 Jun 1992 23:27:29 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Editors of PMC <PMC@NCSUVM.BITNET>
Subject:      Re: "Non-article" messages in ejournals/
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              23 Jun 1992 06:07:24 EDT from <dkyburz@TECHDATA.COM>
 
Marilyn Geller asks about non-article postings to e-journal distribution
lists, and Dan Kyburz suggests that such messages be posted to alternate
lists (list-d).  Allow me to point out a problem with Dan's strategy,
from the point of view of an e-journal editor, and a possible solution
to Marilyn's problem.  _Postmodern Culture_ has around 2,000 subscribers;
PMC also hosts a daily discussion group, PMC-TALK, which has around 500
subscribers.  When we post calls for reviewers of essays or calls for
book reviews, we don't want to limit ourselves to the subset of PMC sub-
scribers who also subscribe to PMC-TALK, so we post to PMC-LIST, the
distribution list for the journal.  It's important to us that we have
the widest possible circulation of calls for reviwers, since the essays
we put up for review often call for specialized readers.  But we do
publish PMC in issues, three times a year: only those things listed in
the tables of contents of issues are "published" by the journal; perhaps
Marilyn and other serials librarians could catalogue/archive only those
items, and ignore anything not listed in a table of contents--certainly
the calls for reviewers are transitory, and are not intended to be
treated in the same way as essays published in the journal.
 
John Unsworth
Co-editor, _Postmodern Culture_
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 25 Jun 1992 09:50:06 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Harry M. Kriz" <KRIZ@VTVM1.BITNET>
Subject:      Journal alternatives
 
Much of the discussion surrounding electronic journals fails to
distinguish among several quite different aspects of publication.
Arguments about the advantages and disadvantages of the technical
medium get mixed up in discussions of the administrative
methods of producing the final product. The success of the electronic
journal will depend on its ability to fulfill the functions required
by those who publish and by those who read.  Discussions of how
things "should" be done for the "good" of "all" using the "best"
technical and administrative systems may have little relation
to the possibilities for success.
 
With only one exception, I have not seen a discussion of e-journals
which acknowledges that every proposal and argument in favor of
e-journals has its analogy in the production of non-electronic
alternatives to the common model of paper journal production.
 
For instance, having a central depository of articles to be
delivered on demand has been done by NTIS, NASA, DOE (AEC and ERDA)
and ERIC, among others. Having information published and
distributed by the universities has been done by the agriculture
and engineering experiment stations, as well as the university presses.
 
All of the alternatives in the past have failed in one way or another to
replace the publication of paper journals.  This may be due to the
failure to consider (or at least the tendency to misunderstand)
the purposes and functions of publication. Paper journals exist
for reasons important to writers and readers.  These reasons should
be fully understood in seeking to develop an alternative.
 
Subscribers to this list may find it useful to read:
 
   "Attempts to find alternatives to the scientific journal:
    a brief review"
 
   by Anne B. Piternick,  Journal of Academic Librarianship,
                          Vol 15, no. 5, pp. 260-266, November, 1989.
 
 
Addressing the issues identified by Professor Piternick
may assist those experimenting with the electronic alternative
to the scientific journal.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Harry M. Kriz            KRIZ@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU  PHONE: (703)231-7052
Automation Librarian     University Libraries
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
Blacksburg, VA, 24061-0434
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 26 Jun 1992 13:04:29 DST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Steve Koski <KOSKI@SBU.EDU>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
So far the discussion on page numbering has addressed the issue of
indexing but the broader issue of relocating a known citation has been
overlooked.  Original research is facilitated by textual searches,
but electronic journals also need a citation mechanism that will
allow scholars to readily returning to information that has been cited
elsewhere.  Citation verification is an essential part of research
and publication.
 
For instance, if I need to check the accuracy of a quote, paraphrase
or other factual element in an electronic journal, I don't want to
have to do a full text search because the search might give me
multiple hits on irrelevant material -- A waste of my time.  Cite
material should be as easy to locate in an electronic publication as
it is in printed journals like Journalism Quarterly from article
title, date, or volume and issue numbers, and page numbers.
 
Electronic journals need an analagous citation system so their
extraordinary speed and thoroughness in one area is not offset by a
handicap in again finding cited material already found.
 
Article titles would be useful.  Date of publication, and volume and
issue numbers would be needlessly redundent, but then they are mostly
redundent for printed journals, too.  Retaining both would provide
the researcher with his or her choice of search methods.
 
Page numbers of some type are essential but they should not interfere
with the readability of the text.  Line numbering probably is not a
good alternative because it may impede readability.  Paragraph
numbering is better.
 
Screen numbering might be the best.  An electronic page could be
standardized to 24 lines, the standard depth of the PC screen.  The
negative side might be a cumbersome pagination system for printed
drafts of the text.  This would be less of a problem if printout
were standardized to two screen pages per printed page.   I like the
idea of the 24 line page because it would conform to use of the Page
Up/Page Down keys on the PC and browsing a page at a time would be
facilitated. Other software solutions should be possible.
 
 
Steve Koski
Mass Communication Department
St. Bonaventure University
St. Bonaventure,
New York 14778
 
(716)  375-2520
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 26 Jun 1992 13:22:05 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stu Weibel <stu@RSCH.OCLC.ORG>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
> Screen numbering might be the best.  An electronic page could be
> standardized to 24 lines, the standard depth of the PC screen.  The
> negative side might be a cumbersome pagination system for printed
> drafts of the text.  I like the idea of the 24 line page because it
> would conform to use of the Page Up/Page Down keys on the PC and
> browsing a page at a time would be facilitated.
 
 
Please, let us not tie ourselves to the dinosaur of a PC screen!
[reader stumbles backwards, arms crossed in front of himself to shield
himself against the accursed green glow] Or any other piece of
hardware.  It is essential that the data of a journal not be tied to
any particular display representation, either a piece of paper or a screen.
 
Paragraph numbering along with an accession number for an article is a
very good solution.  Data objects (paragraphs) might easily have hidden
attributes (such as a paragraph number) that need not even be shown
unless requested by the user (for citation purposes), thereby lessoning
screen clutter.
 
Stuart Weibel
OCLC Office of Research
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 26 Jun 1992 20:07:00 GMT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "John R. Garrett" <0004716758@MCIMAIL.COM>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
Stuart, if you don't want to be tied to the PC screen (stumbling across the
room), why tie the structure to the paragraph?  What's a paragraph in a
multimedia work?  Is a paragraph an irreducible structure of thought (not
likely) or a print convention that may or may not be appropriate in more fluid
mediums?  But if not the paragraph, what else?  Can we avoid defining a minimum
constituent of a copyrighted work (please!!  let's avoid it!! -- but how?)?
 
John Garrett
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 26 Jun 1992 16:43:05 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stu Weibel <stu@RSCH.OCLC.ORG>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
> if you don't want to be tied to the PC screen...
 
There is enormous importance in maintaining a database free of the
impedimenta of a changing hardware environment.  Whatever the choice
of retrieval unit, it is critical that this point be observed.
 
> why tie the structure to the paragraph?
 
A paragraph is a reasonable unit of text retrieval (which is
what is at issue, not irreducible structures of thought).   For
practical reasons, sentences may be too small...  sections?  I would
think too big, but I am not ideologically opposed to other
possibilities, except to the extent that they are tainted with a
particular artifact of display (page, screen, etc.)
 
 
As for other media, each will have some instrinsic unit for reference
and retrieval that will probably be as much determined by practical
considerations as hypothetical ones.
 
> Can we avoid defining a minimum constituent of a copyrighted work
> (please!!  let's avoid it!! -- but how?)?
 
I don't understand this point... please elaborate?
 
Stuart Weibel
OCLC Office of Research
 
[who is going home now to stare at his 25 line greenly-glowing monitor ;-) ]
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 26 Jun 1992 16:31:34 PDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Dale Mead <dcm@APPLE.COM>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
In-Reply-To:  <9206262029.AA14034@apple.com>; from "John R. Garrett" at Jun 26,
              92 8:07 pm
 
I don't think that the question is how to get to the most irreducible
structure of thought, but how to get to the most "convenient" method
of locating a particular thought within a larger set of thoughts.
Traditionally, with most works, a printed page was a relatively fixed,
moderately sized "chunk" that served most purposes, but certainly not all.
Many types of legal literature are cited by a formalized paragraph number
(that may not relate to indentations), because page numbers are not
sufficently stable that they can be utilized  (loose leaf services frequently
do this).  Likewise, poems and classical literature is often cited by
line number, presumably because the people who use the literature need
a fairly fine citation form to avoid confusion (frequently it is necessary
to be able to cite down to the level of a word or two) and because there
may be different pagination in different copies of the work--although
sometimes there is even a standard here (e.g. Loeb's).
 
I think that we are looking more for consistent markers for locating
 informationrather than trying to deal with some kind of epistemic structure.
 Paragraphs
seem to me to be relatively more stable as an identifier than does screen
page--which can vary even if a person lines up the first page different than
another.  Multimedia will probably have to have its own citation format.
(Movie and video screens are often cited within the industry by minute:second:
frame).
 
Dale
--
 
Dale C. Mead                                Voice:   (408)974-5811
Senior Information Specialist               Fax:     (408)725-8502
Corporate Library                           e-mail:  dcm@apple.com
Apple Computer, Inc.                        desktop: dcm@taurus.apple.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 27 Jun 1992 13:35:00 GMT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "John R. Garrett" <0004716758@MCIMAIL.COM>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
Re the minimum irreducible unit of a copyrighted work...
 
Traditionally, in print, is has been assumed that a work is a work is a work,
and that one copyrighted work can be fairly easily distinguished from another.
Similarly, it hasn't been necessary to define exact criteria to demonstrate when
one printed copyrighted work is derivative from another, because it hasn't been
a major issue yet, except in the moral/ethical domain of plagiarism.  This is a
result both of powerful traditions of scholarship (and here I'm only talking
about scholarly, scientific and technical work), and because the medium places
boundaries (covers) on a work, distinguishing it from another.
 
But computers change all that, by providing bits without borders.  It's like the
problem in music, of distinguishing copyrightability, and infringement, in a
digitally created work that takes pieces of hundreds of others and combines them
in ways that may be unrecognizable as sound elements to their original creators,
but perhaps recognizable as bits.  Computers give us the same capacity for text.
If the defining quantity is the paragraph, what happens when we have much more
powerful search engines, which automatically deliver not only the results of the
search, but mold the various works found into an apparently seamlessly
integrated package, which might encompass words, phrases, etc. from hundreds of
others.  What rights do the original rightsholders still retain, if any?  How
would you prove it?  These questions are coming at us, and are the impetus for
raising questions about the irreducible minimum of a work.  If I find my word in
your summary, and it's a word that's unique to me (or at least I think so), have
you infringed?  Is a word enough?  Etc.
 
You can see why I'd like to see some other way of handling these issues in a
copyright environment.  But I'm at least clear that they're coming.
 
John Garrett
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 27 Jun 1992 11:50:11 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stevan Harnad <harnad@PRINCETON.EDU>
Subject:      Intellectual Property and its Discontents
 
On Sat, 27 Jun 1992, John R. Garrett <0004716758@MCIMAIL.COM>
wrote in VPIEJ-L@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu:
 
> Traditionally, in print, it has been assumed that a work is a work is a
> work, and that one copyrighted work can be fairly easily distinguished
> from another. Similarly, it hasn't been necessary to define exact
> criteria to demonstrate when one printed copyrighted work is derivative
> from another, because it hasn't been a major issue yet, except in the
> moral/ethical domain of plagiarism. This is a result both of powerful
> traditions of scholarship (and here I'm only talking about scholarly,
> scientific and technical work), and because the medium places
> boundaries (covers) on a work, distinguishing it from another.
>
> But computers change all that, by providing bits without borders. It's
> like the problem in music, of distinguishing copyrightability, and
> infringement, in a digitally created work that takes pieces of hundreds
> of others and combines them in ways that may be unrecognizable as sound
> elements to their original creators, but perhaps recognizable as bits.
> Computers give us the same capacity for text. If the defining quantity
> is the paragraph, what happens when we have much more powerful search
> engines, which automatically deliver not only the results of the
> search, but mold the various works found into an apparently seamlessly
> integrated package, which might encompass words, phrases, etc. from
> hundreds of others. What rights do the original rightsholders still
> retain, if any? How would you prove it? These questions are coming at
> us, and are the impetus for raising questions about the irreducible
> minimum of a work. If I find my word in your summary, and it's a word
> that's unique to me (or at least I think so), have you infringed? Is a
> word enough? Etc.
>
> You can see why I'd like to see some other way of handling these issues in a
> copyright environment. But I'm at least clear that they're coming.
>
> John Garrett
 
This topic has come up before, and no doubt will do so again and again.
Here is an extract from an earlier discussion  in COMMED (ftp instructions
for retrieving the entire file -- psyc.background4 -- appear at the
end of the message.
 
Gerald M. Phillips, Professor, Speech Communication, Pennsylvania State
University (GMP@PSUVM.BITNET) wrote on Commed:
 
> Plagiarism is a major concern in using an electronic network. I am
> hesitant to share material that might be useful because my copyrights are
> not protected on this network. I enjoy the chitchat effect, but I have
> told several people who have contacted me about my "on-line" course, that
> I would be happy to share articles or have them come out an observe. I would
> not attempt to offer advice using this medium. It would be guaranteed to
> be half-baked and inapposite.
 
I have two replies here; one objective and quite decisive, the other a
somewhat subjective observation: There are ways to implement peer
discussion that will preserve priority as safely as the ordinary mail,
telephone and word-processor media (none completely immune to
techno-vandalism these days, by the way) to which we already entrust our
prepublication ideas and findings. I'll discuss these in the future.
 
As food for thought, consider that it would be simple to implement a
network with read/write access only for a group of peers in a given
specialty, where every posting is seen by everyone who matters in the
specialty (and is archived for the record, to boot). These are the people
who ASSIGN the priorities. A wider circle might have read-only access,
and perhaps one of them might try (and even succeed) to purloin an
idea and publish it as his own -- either in a low-level print
journal or a low-level electronic group. So what? The peers saw it
first, and know whence it came, and where and when, with the archive
to confirm it (printed out in hard copy, if you insist!). That's the
INTRINSIC purpose of scholarly priority. If some enterprising
vita-stuffer up for promotion at New Age College pries the covers off
my book and substitutes his own, that's not a strike against the
printed medium, is it?
 
Now the subjective point: It seems paradoxical, to say the least, to
be worried about word glut and quality decline at the same time as
being preoccupied with priority and plagiarism. Here is some more food
for thought: The few big ideas that there are will not fail to be
attributed to their true source as a result of the net. As to the many
little ones (the "minimal publishable units," or what have you), well, I
suppose that a scholar can spend his time trying to protect those too --
or he can be less niggardly with them in the hope that something bigger
might be spawned by the interaction.
 
It's all a matter of scale. I'm inclined to think that for the really
creative thinker, ideas are not in short supply. It's the tree that
bears the fruit that matters: "He who steals my apples, steals trash,"
or something like that. The rival anecdote is that Einstein was asked
in the fifties by some tiresome journalist -- a harbinger of our
self-help/new-age era -- what activity he was usually engaged in when
he got his creative ideas (shaving? showering? walking? sleeping?), and
he replied that he really couldn't say, because he had only had one or
two creative ideas in his entire lifetime... (Nor was he particularly
secretive about them, I might add, engaging in intense scholarly
correspondence about them with his peers, most of whom could not even
grasp, much less pass them off as their own.)
 
> And please address the issue of those of us who make our living out of the
> printed word and fear plagiarism above earthquakes and forest fires.
> Gerald M. Phillips, Pennsylvania State University
 
I imagine that a different system of values and expectations will be
engendered by the net. One may have to make one's reputation
increasingly by being a fertile collaborator rather than a prolific
monad. I think interactive productivity ("interproductivity") will turn
out to be just as viable, answerable and rewardable a way of establishing
one's intellectual territory as the old way; it's just that the
territory will be much less exclusive, more overlapping and
interdependent. That's the cumulative direction in which inquiry has been
heading all along anyway.
 
As to words themselves: I think it will be possible to protect them
just as well as in the old media. The ones who are really able to use
the language (like the ones who have really new ideas or findings) will
still be a tiny minority, as they are now and always will be, and we'll
know even better who they are and what they have written. It'll be
easier to steal a few of their screenfuls for lowly use, but, as
always, it will be impossible to steal their source. As to the rest --
marginal ideas and marginal prose -- I can't really work up a sense of
urgency about them; it seems to me, however, that it will be just as
easy as before to make sure they get their dubious due, in terms of
their official standing in the two-dimensional hierarchy [Harnad 1990].
 
Stevan Harnad
Department of Psychology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ 08544
harnad@princeton.edu
--------------------------------------------------------------
 
Harnad, S. (1990) Scholarly Skywriting and the Prepublication Continuum
of Scientific Inquiry. Psychological Science 1: 342 - 343 (reprinted in
Current Contents 45: 9-13, November 11 1991).
 
Harnad, S. (1991) Post-Gutenberg Galaxy: The Fourth Revolution in the
Means of Production of Knowledge. Public-Access Computer Systems Review
2 (1): 39 - 53 (also reprinted in PACS Annual Review Volume 2
1992; and in R. D. Mason (ed.) Computer Conferencing: The Last Word. Beach
Holme Publishers, 1992; and in A. L. Okerson (ed.) Directory of
Electronic Journals, Newsletters, and Academic Discussion Lists, 2nd
edition. Washington, DC, Association of Research Libraries, Office of
Scientific & Academic Publishing, 1992).
 
Harnad, S. (1992) Interactive Publication: Extending the
American Physical Society's Discipline-Specific Model for Electronic
Publishing. Serials Review, Special Issue on Economics Models for
Electronic Publishing, pp. 58 - 61.
 
The above files are available by anonymous ftp from
hostname: princeton.edu
directory: pub/harnad
filenames harnad90.skywriting
	  harnad91.postgutenberg
	  harnad92.interactivpub
          psyc.background4    (commed discussion)
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 27 Jun 1992 13:54:30 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      E-Text Citation
 
Does anyone know the status of the ISO working paper called "Documentation
-- Bibliographic references -- Electronic Documents or Parts Thereof"
[ISO TC 46/SC 9/WI 117, submitted to a committee draft 1/12/91; Project
Leader M. Morrison] ?
 
Is this document publicly available and from where/whom?
 
Thank you kindly,
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 237-2052
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 29 Jun 1992 10:03:29 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Stu Weibel <stu@RSCH.OCLC.ORG>
Subject:      Electronic Copyright Issues: minimum unit size
 
John Garrett raises interesting issues about copyrights in the age of
electronic documents.  Will our choice of retrieval units have an
impact on copyright?
 
Acknowledging my formal ignorance in this area, it nonetheless strikes
me as likely that some common sense notion of when one's intellectual
property has been appropriated will remain the guiding force behind
copyright case law.
 
True, it is much easier to steal in the digital arena (and perhaps
harder to remember the source of information?), but Fair Use as a
principle will survive and protect us from certain unreasonable
constraints on use of electronic documents and their artifacts.
 
I wonder what Ted Nelson and the Xanadu folks think about this...
anyone from that camp on the list?
 
Stu Weibel
OCLC Office of Research
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 29 Jun 1992 15:05:00 GMT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Carol A. Risher" <0001750401@MCIMAIL.COM>
Subject:      RE: Electronic Copyright Issues: minimum unit size
 
Concerning Stu Weibel's question about whether the size of
retrieval units will impact on copyright, my thoughts are that
the medium does not change the law.  Technology may indeed make
it easier to appropriate in private, but copying is still copying
and if it is harder to enforce, then alternatives may have to be
developed such as licensing schemes.  When the copyright act of
1978 was first implemented, I remember discovering a school with
a laminating machine.  The school laminated all the pages of the
math workbooks so the students could write the answers in grease
pencil for later wiping off and re-use.  The lawyers reviewed the
phenomenon and explored whether the school was violating copyright
law by "making a derivative work" or whether simply placing
plastic sheets on the book would result in the same effect.  The
resolution was to wait and see if this practice became prevalent
and then decide whether to lease the books on an anuall basis
and retrieve them at year end or perhaps sell them with laminated
pages or other marketplace responses...when the problem was real.
Today, I do believe the copyright law still works fine and nothing
has to be changed and I do not think protection must be linked
to size of retrievable unit.
 
Would be interested in the responses of others.
 
P.S. laminated pages never became a major problem.
 
Carol Risher
AAP
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 29 Jun 1992 11:55:01 -0700
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         "Lee Jaffe, McHenry Library, UC Santa Cruz,
              408/459-3297" <jaffe@UCSCM.UCSC.EDU>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
 
Folks might want to look at how this has been handled in the past.  One
case I know only slightly is that of Westlaw and their competitors
(essentially Lexis).  Westlaw had developed a citation scheme in their
print editions and this had in turn become the standard method of
citing legal decisions.  When Westlaw went online, they carried the
the citation method over and was therefore very successful.  Someone
citing a case from a Westlaw search could reference it in a way that
someone else could find it, even in print.  However, when Lexis started
to use Westlaw citations in their database, I hear that Westlaw came
down on them, claiming that their numbering was proprietary.  Since
Lexis didn't have a print product of their own and everyone had the
West publications, they were in a sticky position.  I don't know how
Lexis resolved the problem but they are still in business.
 
-- Lee Jaffe
 
> Can we avoid defining a minimum constituent of a copyrighted work
> (please!!  let's avoid it!! -- but how?)?
 
I don't understand this point... please elaborate?
 
Stuart Weibel
==============================
 
What I think is meant by the above is that given the wide range of
publication formats we are already seeing, not to mention all those
still to appear, that it is going to be very difficult and very
constrictive to set one standard for citing parts for all of them.
 
It sounds like each publication is going to have to include retriev-
ability into its design considerations.  Eventually we may see the
emergence of  de facto standards for certain kinds of publications,
but it may be too early to try to enforce standards.  In the mean-
time, however, publishers need to consider including some means of
referring to items within their publications.  (Note:  Though the
print literature has largely settled on the page as the standard
unit, everything else it pure chaos.  There is certainly no standard
for volume and part numbering.)
 
-- lj
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 29 Jun 1992 15:30:14 PDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
From:         Dale Mead <dcm@APPLE.COM>
Subject:      Re: PSYC volume/issue numbering
In-Reply-To:  <9206291900.AA28213@apple.com>; from "Lee Jaffe,
              McHenry Library, UC Santa Cruz,
              408/459-3297" at Jun 29, 92 11:55 am
 
Lee Jaffe, McHenry Library, UC Santa Cruz,              408/459-3297 writes:
>
> Folks might want to look at how this has been handled in the past.  One
> case I know only slightly is that of Westlaw and their competitors
> (essentially Lexis).  Westlaw had developed a citation scheme in their
> print editions and this had in turn become the standard method of
> citing legal decisions.  When Westlaw went online, they carried the
> the citation method over and was therefore very successful.  Someone
> citing a case from a Westlaw search could reference it in a way that
> someone else could find it, even in print.  However, when Lexis started
> to use Westlaw citations in their database, I hear that Westlaw came
> down on them, claiming that their numbering was proprietary.  Since
> Lexis didn't have a print product of their own and everyone had the
> West publications, they were in a sticky position.  I don't know how
> Lexis resolved the problem but they are still in business.
>
 
The case was decided in favor of West by the U.S. Court of Appeal several
years ago.  My recollection is that Mead Data stopped using the "STAR"
paginiation feature for a period of time, then licensed it from West
(as part of an antitrust settlement?).  Personnally, I think that Feist
seriously undercuts the rational of West v. Mead Data--but then I never
thought much of the court's reasoning to begin with.  There is a bill
presently before Congress to specifically exclude pagination and other
generally needed citation forms from copyright protection.
 
Dale
 
----------------
Dale C. Mead                                Voice:   (408)974-5811
Senior Information Specialist               Fax:     (408)725-8502
Corporate Library                           e-mail:  dcm@apple.com
Apple Computer, Inc.                        desktop: dcm@taurus.apple.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 30 Jun 1992 20:14:31 -0400
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" <VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET>
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         Edward Vielmetti <emv@MSEN.COM>
Subject:      ISSN for electronic serials
 
One sign that an on-line journal is "real" is that it has
some identifying mark on issues that tie the publication back
to something that can be cataloged - e.g, an ISSN number.
 
This is a (short) list of electronic serials that I have found
that have ISSN numbers attached to them.  If you have more
of these or if your journal is not listed here please drop me
a line.
 
An article from the September 1990 NETMONTH, excerpted in GOVDOC-L
on 27 August 1990 and reprinted in comp.archives, has information
about the National Serials Data Project (NSDP) and their serials
cataloging project.  The listed contact for furhter information is
+1 202 707 6452, and their brochure "ISSN is for Serials".
 
; index to issn labeled e journals
 
1045-1064	Journal of Technology Education
1048-6542	The Public-Access Computer Systems Review
1050-6004	Public-Access Computer Systems News
1052-2239	News of Earth
1053-1920	Postmodern Culture
1053-8496	Quanta
1054-1055	EJournal
1054-6510	USSR-D (USSR news and information digest)
1055-0143	Psycoloquy
1056-6694	ALCTS NETWORK NEWS
1058-692X	MeckJournal
1060-2356	Current Cites
1062-9424	EFFector Online
1183-9937	Ioudiaos Review
1188-5734	The Religious Studies Publications Journal - CONTENTS
 
Now, the real question: is the right set of people on-line so that
ISSN number requests could be processed without having to fill out paper
forms?  If so, then just going through the process of attaching ISSNs
to journals and getting them tagged, labelled, registered could be part
of the community effort to move electronic serials forward.
 
Edward Vielmetti, vice president for research, Msen Inc. emv@Msen.com
      Msen Inc., 628 Brooks, Ann Arbor MI  48103 +1 313 741 1120
</PRE>
<P>
__________________________________________________________________<ADDRESS><A
NAME=z0 HREF="http://borg.lib.vt.edu:80/z-borg/www/jpowell.html">James Powell</A></ADDRESS>
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