VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

October 1992

=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 5 Oct 1992 08:11:54 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         "(Edward Vielmetti)" 
Subject:      Machine Intelligence News
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
another electronic journal under consideration, this a commercial newsletter.
 
--Ed
 
[ Article crossposted from comp.newprod ]
[ Author was ian@turing-institute.ac.uk ]
[ Posted on Fri, 2 Oct 1992 16:01:59 GMT ]
 
-------------------------
Machine Intelligence News
-------------------------
 
is one of the UK's leading industry newsletters on
intelligent technologies.
 
The Publisher, JV Publications, in conjunction with the
Turing Institute, is considering the viability of
making the newsletter available by email.
 
If you would like to receive a sample issue please
contact:
 
Ian Watson
Head of Information Services
 
ian@uk.ac.turing         	Tel      +44 41 552 6400
				Fax      +44 41 552 2985
 
The Turing Institute Ltd
36 North Hanover Street, Glasgow G1 2AD, Scotland, UK
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 5 Oct 1992 08:12:20 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         "(Edward Vielmetti)" 
Subject:      Home Power Magazine / ISSN 1050-2416
 
for the archives, a magazine whose back issues can be found on a bulletin
board system.
 
--Ed
 
[ Article crossposted from comp.org.eff.talk ]
[ Author was Don.Kulha@f7.n125.z1.fidonet.org ]
[ Posted on 3 Oct 92 01:10:10 GMT ]
 
     [some material deleted]
 
Changed it's name a while back to Sonoma Online, SOL!BBS. It's still a
fairly interesting wide-spot in the bitstream and besides serving general
interests has a good collection of Alternative energy files, data and has
the first ten issues of Home Power m agazine online for download as well
as being the home of the moderator of the HOMEPOWR Alternative Energy
EchoConference on FidoNet. I think this is a tremendously useful use of
bandwidth and exciting stuff to have online....but then I would since I'm
the
sysop and aforementioned moderator.
 
     We changed the system name a while back and kind of toned down the
apparent "Survival" aspect of the system. We feel as strongly as ever that
survival is an important topic but came to realize that our enviornment is
the most important battleground a nd that if we can't save it all other
survival considerations are useless. So we changed the name and the
content to some extent...but still have the same agenda....using the
medium to promote ourmutual survival....DCK
 
--
Internet: Don.Kulha@f7.n125.z1.FIDONET.ORG     FidoNet:  Don Kulha @ 1:125/7
Snail:    Don Kulha / Sonoma Online / POB 7518 / Santa Rosa CA 95407
Voice:    +1 707 526 9473                      BBS: 1 707 545 0746 HST/V32b
 
 
 
 
--
uucp: uunet!m2xenix!puddle!125!7!Don.Kulha
Internet: Don.Kulha@f7.n125.z1.fidonet.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 5 Oct 1992 08:13:09 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         "(Edward Vielmetti)" 
Subject:      APIS, Apicultural Information and Issues / ISSN 0889-3764
 
APIS is the Florida Extension Beekeeping newsletter, as archived at the
"Sustainable Agriculture" special collection at the U of North Carolina.
 
--Ed
 
[ Article crossposted from triangle.gardens,rec.gardens,alt.co-evolution,
  misc.rural ]
[ Author was london@SunSite.unc.edu ]
[ Posted on Sun, 4 Oct 1992 15:49:12 GMT ]
 
10-5-92 comprehensive list of files available via:
 
FTP from sunsite.unc.edu
    files are in /pub/docs/sustainable_agriculture
 
E-mail request from london@sunsite.unc.edu
 
 
* = new files
 
   		        miscrural		recgardens
beekeeping	      	newlist.001 *	      	seedproducer.swiss *
handtool.lst		organfarm.jobop
 
beekeeping:
apis-6-92 *	apis-7-92 *	apis-8-92 *	apis-9-92 *
 
miscrural:
buyingruralland.faq	ruralhomes.faq		ruralorganizations.faq
handtoolsources.faq	ruralinfo-misc.faq	ruralsuppliers.faq
ruralbooks.faq		ruralmagazines.faq
 
recgardens:
ben			gardenbooks.nal-usda *	rootinghormone.faq
bulbs.faq		gardensoft.faq		roses.faq
fertilizers.faq		general			seedcats1.faq
forcingbulbs.faq	peppers.faq		seedcats2.faq
 
recgardens/ben:
ben31 *	ben33 *	ben35 *	ben37 *	ben39 *	ben41
ben32 *	ben34 *	ben36 *	ben38 *	ben40	ben42
 
recgardens/general:
mushroomspawn.source
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 13 Oct 1992 08:22:31 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Listserv and FTP file Size
 
What is the maximum size of an ascii file that can safely be sent
via listserv?  This is related to a larger question I have been
meaning to ask for sometime now, what are the maximum sizes of
files for transmission over the Net via both FTP and Listserv.
These numbers will help define what limits should be but on e-serials
and documents.  Also -- how quickly will we see these numbers change
as the Net grows?
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 13 Oct 1992 10:34:48 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(Erik Jul)" 
Subject:      Re: Listserv and FTP file Size
In-Reply-To:  <9210131227.AB24707@oclc-mail.dev.oclc.org>; from "MICHAEL
              STRANGELOVE" at Oct 13, 92 8:22 am
 
Michael:
 
You ask:
>
> What is the maximum size of an ascii file that can safely be sent
> via listserv?  This is related to a larger question I have been
> meaning to ask for sometime now, what are the maximum sizes of
> files for transmission over the Net via both FTP and Listserv.
 
I do not know if any technical or practical limitations exist, but I do
know that I have FTP'd some of the largest files on the Internet, in excess
of 3 Gbytes.  The only limitation I would have encountered would be
local storage.
 
On another topic: your book on E-Publishing.  I am working with appropriate
OCLC managers to prepare a description of "Current Clinical Trials" and
OCLC's current and expected electronic publishing capabilities.
 
Two questions: Do you have a preferred length?  What is your deadline for
submittal of a draft?
 
Thank you.  --Erik
ekj@oclc.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 13 Oct 1992 10:40:50 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      Re: Listserv and FTP file Size
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              13 Oct 1992 08:22:31 EDT from <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
 
Michael--
 
The safest max. size for ascii sent via listserv seems to be about
49Kb.  This is just below the incoming filesize limit for Compuserve
customers (50K, including header), and seems to be within the limits
of some of the other more finicky nodes on the net--but I wouldn't
swear that a 49Kb message will get through everywhere.  We used to
break up longer PMC files into chunks of no more than 49Kb and that
seemed to obviate any size-related delivery problems... we've recently
decided not to do this any more, though, because it imposes an annoying
burden on the majority of our readers (the need to request multiple
parts of a long essay, and the need to assemble them once received):
most people don't seem to have problems receiving files of even 100Kb,
in my experience.
 
John Unsworth
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 13:16:04 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(Wendy Hope Riedel)" 
Subject:      Definition of electronic journal
 
 
Cross-posted on VPIEJ-L and SERIALST -- please forgive the duplication:
===============================================================================
A committee which is developing a manual of acquisition procedures has asked me
to provide a glossary entry for "electronic journal." Do any of you have a
definition you have found useful in describing these beasties?
 
Apart from the issue of "journal/newsletter" vs "list/digest" vs "Hypercard
stack/etc" cited in Strangelove's introduction to EJOURNL1, is there consensus
on whether "electronic" is limited to publications initially distributed by
network transmission or includes distribution on CD-ROM or other
optical/magnetic media which are distributed by mail/FedEx/UPS?  Would you
consider newsletters and other publications distributed by fax to be electronic
journals"?
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 14:41:32 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(David Robison)" 
Subject:      Re:  Definition of electronic journal
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
To my mind, an electronic journal is one that can be read (or
listened to for the blind) in its electronic form. So something
distributed on CD-ROM (and delivered by FedEx, etc.) is an
e-journal if you read it through electronic means. A fax
on the other hand is not, even if it was sent from the
electronic form through a fax modem.  I would consider such
a beast a *paper copy* of an e-journal.
 
David F.W. Robison                   Internet: drobison@library.berkeley.edu
Editor, Current Cites                  Bitnet: drobison@ucblibra
Library Technology Watch Program        Voice: (510)642-7600
UC Berkeley Library                       Fax: (510)643-7891
Berkeley, CA 94720
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:57:49 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Chris Stuart 
Subject:      Citing E-mail
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
Has a standard been established for citing e-mail in a scholarly work?
--------------------------------------
Chris Stuart 
Cornell Information Technologies
509 Olin Library, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY  14850
(607) 255-9099
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:58:47 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joseph Raben 
Subject:      Definition of e-journal
 
I would like to second David Robinson's criterion for defining an e-journal.
In my mind, the way a text is prepared or transmitted is less significant
than the uses to which the recipient/s can put it. In electronic form, that
text can be edited in many ways, searched, forwarded to many other recipients,
combined with other texts, and conveniently be stored for later access. These
characteristics distinguish electronic communication from every other form of
communication we have so far invented, and constitute the paradigm shift that
we are experiencing.
 
 
Joseph Raben
City University of New York
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:59:32 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Re:  Definition of electronic journal
In-Reply-To:  <9210151838.AA23390@a.cni.org>; from "VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU" at
              Oct 15, 92 2:41 pm
 
An electronic text (or journal) exists in an electronic master form.
That form (whether it begins with the first thoughts of the first author
or is created toward the end of the process from scribble on the backs
of envelopes) can be used to produce any distribution format at all:
audio for the blind, electronic networked, electronic CD, fax, standard
paper, articles. Thus, the "end product" of such a text or journal is not
archived paper; it is digitized and capable of becoming anything, flexibly,
fast.  The electronic form is the final, real one, an oxymoron to be sure,
since electronic implies continually changing.
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
ann@cni.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 08:25:56 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Resent-From: James Powell 
From:         James Powell 
 
Received: from VTVM1.BITNET by vtvm1.cc.vt.edu (Mailer R2.08 R208002) with
 BSMTP id 3254; Thu, 15 Oct 92 16:15:48 EDT
MSG:FROM: IACESP  --ASUACAD  TO: VPIEJ-L --VTVM1             10/15/92 13:16:30
 To: VPIEJ-L --VTVM1
 
 *** Reply to note of 10/15/92 13:03
 From: Elliot Palais
 Subject: Citing E-mail
 There is a document which discusses the problems of citing this
 type of information along with examples. To retrieve the document,
 send mail to:
     COMSERVE@RPIECS
  In body, put: SEND COMPFILE BIBREF.
 
 Elliot Palais, Social Sciences Coordinator
 Arizona State University Libraries,
 Tempe, AZ 85287; IACESP@ASUACAD; IACESP@ASUVM.INRE.ASU.EDU
Citing E-mail                                                          R
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 08:26:44 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(Stu Weibel)" 
Subject:      Re:  Definition of e-journal
 
The preparation and transmission of E-texts are in fact also vital
aspects of their character.  The preparation of scholarly text will
someday be very different than today, and the availability of text in
distributed networking environments will have a profound impact on the
way it is used and the economics of creation, storage, and distribution.
 
 
Stuart Weibel
OCLC Office of Research
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 08:27:07 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      Re: Definition of electronic journal
In-Reply-To:  Message of Thu, 15 Oct 1992 13:16:04 EDT from 
 
My own feeling is that the word "electronic" in "electronic journals"
means that the journals are distributed on electronic media, not just
(or not only) transmitted by electronic means.  That would leave out
of the definition any fax-distributed newsletters, since the medium is
paper (OK, I can see this one coming: what about computers that act as
fax machines and store the incoming data as binary files?).  I usually
specify "networked electronic journals" when I want to indicate what
we usually think of as "e-journals"--and I would include in the more
general "electronic journal" categories those journals which are
distributed on disk.
 
John Unsworth
Co-editor, _Postmodern Culture_
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 08:27:48 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re:  Citing E-mail
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:57:49 EDT
> From: Chris Stuart 
>
> Has a standard been established for citing e-mail in a scholarly work?
>
> Chris Stuart 
> Cornell Information Technologies
> 509 Olin Library, Cornell University
> Ithaca, NY  14850
> (607) 255-9099
 
I don't know whether there is a uniform standard yet, but this is the
format PSYCOLOQUY has provisionally adopted:
 
First, an article's file name encodes encodes the following
information:
 
   JOURNAL-NAME.year.volume-number.item-number.TOPIC.thread-number.AUTHOR:
 
For example, an item with file name:
 
   psycoloquy.92.3.46.space.7.velichkovsky
 
would be formally cited in an article as follows:
 
   Velichkovsky, B. M. (1992) The Spatial Representation System: A Single
   System of Perceptual-Verbal Access? PSYCOLOQUY 3(46) space.7.
 
What is unique to the electronic medium is:
 
(1) Item-numbers replace issue numbers, because each item is an issue in
itself. It makes no sense to bundle together multiple unrelated articles
in one "issue" in the electronic medium.
 
(1) There is a unique TOPIC name in the filename, making the scanning
and retrieval of the filename list (see below) more useful and
informative than numbers only would have done. This modification is
dictated by the unique electronic searching capacities of the new
medium.
 
(2) The "thread number" allows readers to electronically search and
retrieve successive items in the thread of discussions on a given
unique TOPIC. Thread numbers may point to earlier stages of discussion
on the same TOPIC in prior years.
 
(3) The AUTHOR name also allows retrieval by author.
 
(4) Paragraph numbers replace page numbers, but it has not yet been decided
whether it would be useful to include a paragraph span with the citation.
 
It should be clear that the volume number is redundant and
uniformative, and is retained only for the purposes of continuity with
prior citation and index practices (it will disappear eventually, just
as bundling multiple unrepated items in a single "issue" has already
been abandoned).
 
Below is a sample fragment of the PSYCOLOQUY index file. First,
connecting by anonymous ftp would list the following files
(I show only a sample of 10):
 
psyc.92.3.57.data-archive.4.jennings
psyc.92.3.56.data-archive.3.gelobter
psyc.92.3.55.data-archive.2.graham
psyc.92.3.54.consciousness.29.enright
psyc.92.3.53.consciousness.28.bridgeman
psyc.92.3.52.space.10.montello
psyc.92.3.51.space.9.bryant
psyc.92.3.50.consciousness.27.bridgeman
psyc.92.3.49.space.8.bryant
psyc.92.3.48.consciousness.26.rickert
psyc.92.3.47.consciousness.25.mcgovern
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Now here is the corresponding portion of the 1992 index file
(called psyc.92.index). This file is continuously updated as new items
ar published thoughout a given year:
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
INDEX FOR PSYCOLOQUY Volume 3  1992
 
Note that the filename for retrieving each item appears at the end of the
2nd line of each entry.
 
Filenames are of the form:
 
psyc.92.3.x.topicname.y.authorname
 
This refers to the x'th item in 1992 Volume 3 for the y'th item on that
topic (whose discussion may have begun in a prior year and Volume).
----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
McGovern, Katharine, & Baars, Bernard J. Consciousness confounded
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, June 24, 1992. psyc.92.3.47.consciousness.25.mcgovern
 
Rickert, Neil W. Consciousness and simulation
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, June 24, 1992. psyc.92.3.48.consciousness.26.rickert
 
Bryant, David J. How many spatial systems? (Reply to Velichkovsky)
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, September 9, 1992. psyc.2.3.49.space.8.bryant
 
Bridgeman, Bruce. Mental life as simulation. (Reply to Rickert)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.50.consciousness.27.bridgeman
 
Bryant, David J. Lexical contributions to spatial representation (Reply to
 Brugman)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.51.space.9.bryant
 
Montello, Daniel R. Characteristics of environmental spatial cognition.
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.52.space.10.montello
 
Bridgeman, Bruce. Planning to plan: Iterative brain function (Reply to
 McGovern/Baars)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.53.consciousness.28.bridgeman
 
Enright, J.T. Has consciousness become a soluble problem?
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.54.consciousness.29.enright
 
Graham, Peter Protecting the integrity of electronically archived data.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.55.data-archive.2.graham
 
Gelobter, Michael. Public data-archiving: A fair return on publicly funded
 research.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.92.3.55.data-archive.3.gelobter
 
Jennings, Edward M. Endorsement of ftp internet archiving of data.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.92.3.56.data-archive.4.jennings
 
------------------------------
 
Below is the article itself, but with all but the first and last
paragraphs deleted:
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
psycoloquy.92.3.46.space.7.velichkovsky             Tuesday  June 23 1992
ISSN 1055-0143                   (7 paragraphs, 11 references, 129 lines)
                Copyright 1992 Boris M. Velichkovsky
 
                THE SPATIAL REPRESENTATION SYSTEM:
                A SINGLE SYSTEM OF PERCEPTUAL-VERBAL ACCESS?
                Commentary on Bryant on Space
 
                Boris M. Velichkovsky
                Department for Psychology and Engineering of Knowledge
                Moscow State University
                Moscow 103009, Russia
                BMV@chair.cogsci.msu.su
                UZIFF016@comparex.hrz.uni-bielefeld.de
 
KEYWORDS: dissociation, levels of cognitive organization, mental
          space, psychophysics, spatial cognition
 
1.1  Bryant's (1992) target article presents an impressive body of
evidence for the possibility of integrating perceptual and verbal
information about space into a common format, but because there may be
an element of confirmatory bias in his discussion I will try to support
another position in this commentary.
 
      [text deleted]
 
1.7  The picture emerging from these considerations is of several
systems situated along the vertical dimension of mental functioning
(Velichkovsky 1990). Bryant's target article does an excellent job of
presenting the evidence on the central portion of the functional
hierarchy, but it unfortunately fails to distinguish human spatial
cognition's important prerequisites and advanced forms. Some of these
systems allow only "perceptual" access, others only "verbal."
 
REFERENCES
 
Aaronson, E. & Rosenbloom, S. (1972) Space perception in early infancy.
Science 177: 1161-1163.
 
Bryant, D.J. (1992) A spatial representation system in human.
PSYCOLOQUY 3 (16) space.1
 
Fauconnier, G. (1984) Espaces mentaux. Paris: Minuit.
 
Gibson, J. J. (1979) An ecological approach to visual perception.
Boston: Houghton Mifflin
 
Jackendoff, R. & Landau, B. (1991) Spatial language and spatial
cognition. In D.J.Napoli & J.A.Kegl (Eds.) Bridges between psychology
and linguistics: A Swarthmore festschrift for Lila Gleitman. Hillsdale,
NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associatates.
 
Leslie, A. (1991, November 1-4) Dissociations in acquiring a "Theory of
mind." Paper presented to the Conference on the Mental Architecture.
Centre for Cognitive Studies, Rutgers University.
 
Lewin, K. (1917) Kriegslandschaft. Zeitschrift fuer angewandte
Psychologie 13: 440-447.
 
Shipley, T. & Rowlings, S.O. (1971) Sensory directions in homogenous
binocular visual space. Perception & Psychophysics 9: 335-337.
 
Tulving, E. (1992, June 11) Human memory: Structures and processes.
Paper presented to the psychophysiological seminar. Faculty of
Psychology, University of Bielefeld.
 
Velichkovsky, B.M. (1990) The vertical dimension of mental functioning.
Psychological Research 52: 282-289.
 
Velichkovsky, B.M., Blinnikova, J.V. & Lapin, E.A. (1986)
Predstavlenije realnogo i voobrazhaemogo prostranstva [Representation
of real and imaginary space]. Voprosy Psykhologii 31: 103-115.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 08:28:28 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
Subject:      Re:  Citing E-mail
 
There is an attempt to establish a standard for the citation of all manner
of electronic media by the National Library of Medicine. The publication
is entitled :
 
National Library of Medicine
Recommended Formats for Bibliographic Citation
1991
 
To date it is the most complete attempt to develop any *style guide*
that addresses the problems unique to the various media.
 
Dennis Moser
Internet:	aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
Go Jays!All the Way!
*Don't be silly!Of course I don't represent the
University of Michigan!*
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 12:20:23 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Re:  Citing E-mail
In-Reply-To:  <9210161232.AA28102@a.cni.org>; from "aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu" at
              Oct 16, 92 8:28 am
 
We call your attention again to the ISO draft standard, whose current
state of publication is not clear (to me).  As of May, it was being
re-read/revised to become a working draft standard for us all to try
out for a few years, but I don't know if that document is yet released
or not.  Its availability might render obsolete any drafts from other
places.  It covers journals as part of a larger framework.
 
Ann Okerson/ARL
ann@cni.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 12:20:45 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Julia C. Blixrud" 
Subject:      Citations for electronic communication
 
ISO/CD 10956 Information and Documentation-Bibliographic references -
Electronic documents or parts therof is a draft standard out for
review from the ISO/TC46/Subcommittee 9.  NISO is the U.S. Technical
Advisory Group to ANSI on the work of TC46 and many of us NISO members
have received that draft for comment.  This is the second draft.  The
draft specifies the elements to be included in bibliographic references
and it sets out a prescribed order for the elements.  It is intended for
use by authors and editors (and does not apply to full bibliographic
descriptions required by librarians, descriptive and analytic
bibliographers, etc.)
The draft covers computer programs, databases, electronic monographs,
electronic serials, bulletin board, and electronic mail.
For further information, I recommend you contact either NISO (at
P.O. Box 1056, Bethesda, MD 20827, 301-975-2814-voice, 301-869-8071-fax)
or the ISO/TC46/SC9 Secretariat (Office of Library Standards, National
Library of Canada, 395 Wellington St.,Ottawa, K1A ON4, CANADA
819-953-0191-fax)
 
Julia Blixrud, Program Officer
Council on Library Resources
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 15:27:55 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "A.J. Wright" 
Subject:      Re: Citing E-mail
In-Reply-To:  Message of Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:57:49 EDT from 
 
Ask three people and you'll probably get four "standards" on citing email, but
the one I use and recommend highly is:
 
Patrias, Karen. _National Library of Medicine Recommended Formats for Biblio-
  graphic Citation_. National Library of Medicine, 1991.
 
This 200pp work covers _everything_, including email, entire databases,
ejournals/, computer files, cdroms, etc.
 
A.J. Wright
Clinical Librarian
Department of Anesthesiology Library
School of Medicine
University of Alabama at Birmingham
meds002@uabdpo
meds002@uabdpo.dpo.uab.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Oct 1992 15:28:09 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         J_CERNY@UNHH.UNH.EDU
Subject:      papers by Dodd and Kulikowski on e-mail citation
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
I have copies in ascii format of a paper by Sue Dodd and a paper by
Stan Kulikowski in which they make various proposals about e-mail
citation.  I can post them or otherwise make them available if people
are interested.
 
On the other hand, the National Library of Medicine and ISO efforts
sound like they would have more momentum behind them.  Are they
available in a form that can be shared over the network?  My recolletion
is that ISO follows the bizarro policy (IMHO) of using standards
as a revenue stream, hence not making them easily available to many
who would like to have them (unlike Internet RFCs, for example).
 
  Jim Cerny, Computing and Information Services, Univ.N.H.
	jim_cerny@unh.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Oct 1992 07:53:26 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Comments Requested
 
I would appreciate comments on the following thoughts: are they
realistic or fanciful and unfounded?
 
 
Consider that the average humanities or social sciences
journal is written by academics, edited  and peer-
reviewed by academics, all at minimal or negligible wages
and then disseminated by a commercial publisher to
universities.  The university structure is used as a pool
of near-free labour for the production of journals that
are then charged against the university budget.  Now the
Net presents universities with the opportunity to act as
their own publisher and distributer at potentially
reduced costs. Eventually the global network will connect
the majority of academic institutions and present journal
purchasers.  When that time comes the main difference
between network based distribution and print based
distribution will be that of form, not content.  Thus the
purchase of print serials from for-profit publishers will
be entirely gratuitous on the part of academia, when the
university clearly has the means disseminate its
intellectual production to the majority of "academic-
knowledge consumers".
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Oct 1992 08:00:31 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Russel=Grocott%ITS=Staff%CURTIN@ba1.curtin.edu.au
Subject:      re: papers by Dodd and Kulikowski on e-mail citation
 
I would be interested in the papers you mentioned.
 
Cheers
	Russel Grocott (email :- grocottr@ba1.curtin.edu.au)
 
James Powell >>> Systems Support and Development, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU                                   O+>
             >>> jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Oct 1992 14:36:04 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
Michael Strangelove asks for comments on his observations about
academics becoming "maitres chez eux" in the electronic publishing era:
 
> Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1992 07:53:26 EDT
> From: MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
>
> Consider that the average humanities or social sciences journal is
> written by academics, edited and peer-reviewed by academics, all at
> minimal or negligible wages and then disseminated by a commercial
> publisher to universities.
 
The publisher is often not commercial, but a non-profit university
publisher or learned society. Academics don't get wages for refereeing
but editorial offices do have budgets: editors receive (modest)
honararia and the rest of the staff gets real wages. Book proposal
reviewers are often paid (modestly) and if volume rises this may have to
happen with journal submission referees too.
 
> The university structure is used as a pool of near-free labour for the
> production of journals that are then charged against the university
> budget.
 
This is partly true, though sometimes the university receives a
(modest) editorial office subsidy from the publisher.
 
> Now the Net presents universities with the opportunity to act as their
> own publisher and distributer at potentially reduced costs. Eventually
> the global network will connect the majority of academic institutions
> and present journal purchasers.
 
True, but there will still be editorial office costs, and if submission
rates are high, with the high accompanying work-load, these costs will
no doubt rise. On the other hand, many other costs will be reduced or
eliminated by electronic dissemination (someone should do the exact
figures -- the publishers' estimates I have seen have not looked even
near accurate relative to my own experience; they seem to be
underestimating the potential savings). In my estimate, electronic
journals will have some much lower real expenses associated with them
(and, even more important, they will have an incomparably greater and
faster "reach," which is the most important factor for the academic
author, who is seeking eyes and ears for his work).
 
> When that time comes the main difference between network based
> distribution and print based distribution will be that of form, not
> content.
 
True (once the graphics problems are all solved). And even certain forms
of rapid interactive content will be possible only on the Net
("Scholarly Skywriting").
 
> Thus the purchase of print serials from for-profit publishers will be
> entirely gratuitous on the part of academia, when the university
> clearly has the means disseminate its intellectual production to the
> majority of "academic- knowledge consumers".
 
As I said, not only for-profit publishers are currently involved in
publishing scholarly journals on paper. Some of the publishers are
university nonprofit publishers -- sometimes the very same university
where the editor and authors are. And if we agree that peer review
itself is something that the academic community is performing (nearly)
gratis currently (just as it is furnishing the writing itself gratis --
the commercial model of selling one's words for profit is not the
academic one, where authors in physics even PAY to reach the eyes and
ears of their intended audience) there are nevertheless the real costs
associated with other essential fuctions -- not paper-related ones --
that the publisher provides: the editorial office, copy-editing, design,
alerting, and the all-important imprimatur of a distinguished publisher
whose level of quality control has been established and can be relied
upon.
 
Academics could of course become jacks of all trades and try to take all
of this upon themselves, but then we can probably also do away with
libraries, granting agencies, admissions offices etc. etc. I think a
division of labor between publishing/editorial-office functions and the
actual writing and refereeing that academics do will continue to be
optimal even in the electronic era.
 
And there's another important factor that individuals tend to forget in
their understandable zeal about the possibilities of the Net: We face a
long transition era in which publication will be necessarily hybrid, at
first most of it paper, then a gradual growth of new electronic-only
journals, some dual journals, some journals making a gradual transition,
etc. This means that whether we like it or not, scholarly publishing
will have to co-habit with many of the exigencies of paper publishing
for some time to come. To imagine otherwise would be to be fancy a
disastrous dissociation between the iceberg and its tip. Electronic
publishing will remain in partnership with paper publishing in a joint
custodianship over scholarly writ in keeping the paper fleet afloat
until everything has been safely transferred to the skies. A financially
ruinous move that threatens to sink the paper fleet any time in the near
future would sink us all.
 
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences (paper), PSYCOLOQUY (electronic)
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Oct 1992 14:36:21 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         GMP@PSUVM.PSU.EDU
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
In-Reply-To:  harnad AT Princeton.EDU -- Mon, 19 Oct 92 10:49:07 EDT
 
    Thank you for the note on the differences between print and electronic
publishing. I am currently trying to get out the first edition of an electronic
journal.  I am being charged for computer system use (although it is a memo
charge only).  The libraries tell me they must convert to print form which
means downloading, editing for form and style, converting to a type face and
binding.  The issue of the print journal they buy for 10.00 actually costs
considerably more converted from electronic form.  (A 150 page journal costs
$15.00 to print off, 2.00 to bind in spiral form, $4.00 in perfect binding).
Furthermore, the outside of the pages require adjustments in shelving
arrangements.  My librarian contact went on with other details not involved
in print journals and came up with a figure of $31, per issue.)  In addition,
I have to pay clerical help to handle my files and also hire people to do
proofreading and editing, all of which is included in the print journal.
 
    I have been editor of two print journals.  I was able to bring out a
192 page journal with standard paper cover, perfect binding, and mailing
to a list of 3,000 for $7,000, slightly over $2.25 per issue.  I had clerical
help also, paid for by the university, the cost of which was about the same
as the clerical help I use on the electronic journal.
 
    The only advantage of the electronic journal is speech, especially during
the reviewing process.  I am still convinced that advocates of electronic
journals are people who want their first drafts published, people who
resist editing.  I also do not believe in the altruistic motives Mr. Strange-
love constantly alleges.  People publish because they want promotion and
tenure. But that is quite another issue.
 
 
GMP@PSUVM
Gerald M. Phillips (Professor Emeritus), Speech Communication
Editor, IPCT: An Electronic Journal for the 21st Century
ISSN 1064-4326.  Send submissions to GMP3 at PSUVM
Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
Manuscripts are being accepted for the January, 1993 issue
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Oct 1992 14:36:48 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      But let's not factor in spurious costs...
 
Gerald M. Phillips  wrote:
 
> Thank you for the note on the differences between print and electronic
> publishing. I am currently trying to get out the first edition of an
> electronic journal. I am being charged for computer system use
> (although it is a memo charge only). The libraries tell me they must
> convert to print form which means downloading, editing for form and
> style, converting to a type face and binding. The issue of the print
> journal they buy for 10.00 actually costs considerably more converted
> from electronic form. (A 150 page journal costs $15.00 to print off,
> 2.00 to bind in spiral form, $4.00 in perfect binding). Furthermore,
> the outside of the pages require adjustments in shelving arrangements.
> My librarian contact went on with other details not involved in print
> journals and came up with a figure of $31, per issue.) In addition, I
> have to pay clerical help to handle my files and also hire people to do
> proofreading and editing, all of which is included in the print
> journal.
 
The generation of a paper copy is a spurious charge and should not be
factored in. Librarians will eventually discover there is no reason
whatever that they "must convert to print form." The other editorial
expenses are real; whether on paper or screen, the text must be edited,
copy-edited, formatted, proof-read, etc.
 
> I have been editor of two print journals. I was able to bring out a 192
> page journal with standard paper cover, perfect binding, and mailing to
> a list of 3,000 for $7,000, slightly over $2.25 per issue. I had
> clerical help also, paid for by the university, the cost of which was
> about the same as the clerical help I use on the electronic journal.
 
Clerical help is needed in both cases, but should not be more in the
electronic case -- except if one reckons in things that are done
clerically here that would normally be done by the printer`s office.
Even so, there should be hefty net savings.
 
> The only advantage of the electronic journal is [speed], especially
> during the reviewing process. I am still convinced that advocates of
> electronic journals are people who want their first drafts published,
> people who resist editing. I also do not believe in the altruistic
> motives Mr. Strangelove constantly alleges. People publish because
> they want promotion and tenure. But that is quite another issue.
 
Speed is not an insignificant factor. Another is the electronic medium's
global reach, accessibility, and inexpensiveness. Yet another is the
possibility it affords of rapid iterations of formal interaction (Peer
Commentary).
 
And sure, academics are motivated by promotion/tenure considerations
too, but that does not separate paper and electronic publication in
principle. In practice it means that the pioneer contributors to
electronic journals will be those who are not daunted by the fact that
credit for their publication will be less sure at first; their primary
goal will be to reach their peers more quickly, cheaply, globally and
interactively with their new ideas and findings. The CV-padders will
make their way to the new medium once it has established its
credentials. The way I see it, sequence is a plus: Let the pace be set
by the ones whose motivation is intrinsic rather than intrinsic.
My guess is that they do the more memorable work anyway.
 
(By the way, I think Dr. Strangelove was referring to the altruism of
editor and referees rather than authors.)
 
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 08:14:40 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
 
Please bear in mind also the fact that many journals are published
by scholarly societies which are able to finance a substantial
portion of their activities from the proceeds.  If serial publishing goes
electronic, and I believe it will, then these organizations must
either learn to achieve comparable revenue from electronic publishing,
raise revenue elsewhere (eg dues), or reduce the level of professional
activities they support.  Or all of the above.  Imagine what the
prospect of electronic publishing looks like to the American
Mathematical Society, the American Geophysical Union, or IEEE!
This is why some, like the AMS for instance, have embarked
upon very innovative and aggressive EP ventures.
 
Things are a little different in the humanities I think.
On the other hand a really good SGML/DSSL text processor would
obviate the need for the MLA stylesheet -- which would probably have
considerable consequences for MLA finances.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 08:15:03 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      Wooden Fleets and Star Fleet
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon,
              19 Oct 1992 14:36:04 EDT from 
 
Thank you for the thoughtful comments, Stevan.  I was quite certain that
I was oversimplifying a complex situation.
 
It will be interesting to see the role played by electronic serials
as the proportion of under or  unemployed phd's shoots through the
roof over the next few decades.
 
I was thinking in particular about those serials that commercial publishers
intentionally pad and overprice.  No, I don't see the end to print or call
for an end, I also do not think that the Net represents a potential
"utopian-technology".
 
One of the things we will soon see is the rise of "peripheral networked
scholarship" where every so often a displaced scholar will effect entire
disciplines while operating almost entirely from within the networked
environment.  The phenomenon will be similar to the occasional occurance
of rogue scholars of the last century, people publishing in fields not
formally their own, or self-publishing, and creating entire "schools of
thought" as amateurs (in the best sense of the word). The issue may not
be which medium ensures "legitimate" knowledge but which medium allows
creative expression and a high level of interactive exchange.
 
By the way, the "Dr." is rather gratuitous  until I finish a mindless
rite of passage, also known as buying a union card, and finish a dissertation.
(An oft made assumption due to the last name, I suppose.) Of course, there
may not be much of a union left...
 
Best wishes,
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 08:15:26 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon, 19 Oct 1992 14:36:21 EDT from 
 
Gerald--
 
With regard to your (librarian's) cost estimates for a (printed) electronic
journal:  why print it?  Shouldn't the library be spending its time and
money figuring out how to provide electronic journals in electronic form?
To hazard an analogy, if I bought a car and then converted it to a horse-
drawn buggy, it would certainly be more expensive than just buying the
buggy....but why would one do that?  To avoid learning how to drive?
 
John Unsworth
Co-editor, _Postmodern Culture_
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 10:14:16 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741" 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University
 
Those following the discussion of printing/not-printing electronic journals
may be interested in an article which arrived in my mail yesterday,
 
Gail McMillan, "Technical Processing of Electronic Journals", *Library
Resources & Technical Services" 36:470-477 (Oct. 1992).
 
It deals with the methods the VPI library uses to maintain on-line a number
of electronic journals for university use, including receipt, check-in, and
other internal issues.  It is a good piece; if non-librarians were to
examine it they would come to a further appreciation of the level of effort
required to perform what seem like fairly straightforward and superficially
simple services.
 
(It's appropriate that it is about VPI activities as this listserv
originates there, I believe).
 
--pg
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 15:01:26 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Linda Hulbert, Medical Center Library" 
Subject:      Re: Comments Requested
 
I don't think that there is any doubt that journal publishing as we know
it is going to change.  However, until there is a fundamental shift in
the way academicians are rewarded (i.e. promotions and tenure), they will
insist on publishing in paper journals and insist that their university
buy back what they gave away.  I have seen estimates as soon as ten years
for this shift, but in discussions I've had with health sciences faculty
they are not rushing to the change...it may rush over them. I'm glad to
see the discussion.  Many times in the past there has been an effort to
supplant the journal as THE medium of communication.  Never before have so
many things conspired to make change possible - electronics, relative
affordability of the machinery, relative ease of access - the sky rocketing
costs of journals - some up 33% this year alone- and a will to make things
different and better.
 
Linda Hulbert
Assistant Director for
   Technical Services
St. Louis University Medical Center Library
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Oct 1992 15:01:56 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Howard Pasternack 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
 
>From:         Editors of PMC 
>
>With regard to your (librarian's) cost estimates for a (printed) electronic
>journal:  why print it?  Shouldn't the library be spending its time and
>money figuring out how to provide electronic journals in electronic form?
>To hazard an analogy, if I bought a car and then converted it to a horse-
>drawn buggy, it would certainly be more expensive than just buying the
>buggy....but why would one do that?  To avoid learning how to drive?
>
 I find this horse and buggy analogy sort of interesting. I think it's
 important to recognize that if the paper world is currently the horse
 and buggy, then the electronic journal is about at the stage of development
 of the horseless carriage.
 
 Howard Pasternack
 Brown University
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 21 Oct 1992 14:00:10 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Anaclare Evans 
Subject:      Re: Comments Requested
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              20 Oct 1992 15:01:26 EDT from 
 
I just want to introduce myself to this list and its readership. I am
Anaclare Evans, Head, Database Management, Wayne State University Libraries
and a doctoral student in higher education.  I am in the process of refining
my dissertation topics, but have definitely narrowed it down to the acceptance
of the electronic journal as a publication medium in relation to the academic
reward system.  I view the problem for the electronic journal not being merely
its form of publication, but the fact that it falls between the paper journal
and the non-traditional forms of scholarship which may occur in the arts such
as exhibitions of paintings, compositions, performances (dance or musical) whic
h act, in some situtations, as substitutes for published (in paper) articles an
d books.  Any input that anyone has on this topic is welcomed and appreciated.
Anaclare Evans
Head, Database Mgt. Wayne State University Libraries, Detroit
voice=313-577-4006
fax 313-577-3615
e-mail aevans@waynest1.bitnet
       aevans@cms.cc.wayne.edu (internet)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 21 Oct 1992 14:02:09 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue, 20 Oct 1992 15:01:56 EDT from 
 
Howard:
 
I agree that e-journals are in the horseless carriage stage right now,
but I think it's worth recognizing that, to the extent that journal form
is affected by technological advances, the development curve for the
horseless journal is likely to be a much shorter one than was the case
with the horseless carriage.
 
John Unsworth
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 21 Oct 1992 14:04:22 EDT
Reply-To:     mzltov@nwu.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was hjacob@CASBAH.ACNS.NWU.EDU
From:         Herbert Jacob 
Subject:      Publishing e-journal
 
I have been editing an e-journal, The Law and Politics Book Review, under
the aegis of the Law, Courts and Judicial Process Section of the American
Political Science Association for the past 18 months and only recently
joined this list.  Even though I began without all the expertise displayed
by you folks, the journal has been a huge success (over 600 subscribers).
However, I do things somewhat differently than what I am gathering most of
the others do.  Because I want print-oriented readers and contributors, I
simulate a print journal in a couple of ways.  First, I provide contributors
(and publishers of the books we review) a lasered off-print that looks much
like an off-print from a printed journal.  That led me to paginate and I
indicate page numbers on the electronically transmissions.  Each issue thus
has a volume, number, date, and page which allows my users to cite the
reviews in exactly the same way as they do print journals.  This "extra"
step of producing an offprint actually takes me only about 10 minutes per
issue since I have the whole thing preformatted in WordPerfect.  I think
part of our success is due to the fact that our e-journal looks like the
familiar print journal.  We publish between 70-90 reviews a year, each
between 1000 and 2500 words; we are usually the first review of a book since
the print journals are MUCH slower.  The cost of the entire operation is
about $700/year.
For any who are interested, they may subscribe by joining the PSRT-L list at
MIZZOU1.MISSOURI.EDU.  The entire journal is archived at Northwestern and
can be accessed at gopher@nwu.edu (enter Northwestern University Information
and then Northwestern Library) if you do not see an e-journal listing in the
first menu.
Herbert Jacob, Northwestern University
Voice Mail 708 491-2648
e-mail mzltov@nwu.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:15:57 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was NETNEWS@AUVM.AMERICAN.EDU
From:         "(Edward Vielmetti)" 
Subject:      Re: Publishing e-journal
 
the law and politics book review looks like a good application of
gopher.
 
you may want to explore putting the whole collection into a WAIS server;
this would facilitate keyword searches across the review set and would
add some more value to it as a reference.
 
another approach to add value is to take the index and mark it up so that
it is suitable for browsing with 'world wide web', an SGML-based markup
system and hypertext browser.  if i were to do that i would also look
at enhancing the index to include ISBN numbers, so that in the (near?)
future when libraries have Z39.50 queries a reader could do a "show holdings"
command and see whether their local library has a copy.
 
there are a number of other legal resources being put together with
gopher; i have a sampling of them under the MSEN gopher as
	MSEN Gopher
	 Selected Internet Resources
	  legal
You would do well to contact the maintainers of other law library
gopher servers and ask them to add you to their journals collection.
 
The "free paper offprints" idea is just absolutely brilliant, I don't
understand why anyone else hasn't come up with the same idea.
 
--Ed
 
Edward Vielmetti, MSEN Inc.  emv@msen.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:16:55 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Howard Pasternack 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
>From:         Editors of PMC 
>
>I agree that e-journals are in the horseless carriage stage right now,
>but I think it's worth recognizing that, to the extent that journal form
>is affected by technological advances, the development curve for the
>horseless journal is likely to be a much shorter one than was the case
>with the horseless carriage.
>
 I'm not good at prognostication, but I would guess that in about two years,
 maybe a bit more, the ascii text e-journal is going to be replaced by
 something considerably more sophisticated.  If this is the case, then
 e-journal editors need to recognize that given the current budget
 constraints, librarians are not going to invest large sums of money
 in supporting a technology which is likely to change, drastically and
 rapidly.
 
 As near as I can tell, librarians have taken two general approaches
 to providing access to e-journals:  (1) the journal is put on a CWIS or
 similar text fileserver; or (2) the journal is printed and put on the
 library shelves.  Both approaches are relatively inexpensive, at least
 in terms of incremental out of pocket costs.  But until the technology
 stabilizes and reaches the maturity of say CD ROM, I don't see librarians
 investing money and effort in experimenting with other approaches.
 
 Howard Pasternack
 Brown University
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:17:43 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      What Scholars Want and Need from Electronic Journals
 
	 Abstract of paper to be presented at ASIS 1992 SESSIONS ON
	 "FULL-TEXT ELECTRONIC ACCESS TO PERIODICALS," sponsored by the
	 ASIS Special Interest Group on Library Automation and
	 Networking (SIG/LAN) and the Association of Research Libraries
	 (ARL) at the 55th ASIS Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh Hilton,
	 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 26-29, 1992. Session II.
	 Full-Text Electronic Access to Periodicals: Strategies for
	 Implementation (Monday, October 26, afternoon)
 
           WHAT SCHOLARS WANT AND NEED FROM ELECTRONIC JOURNALS
 
                      Stevan Harnad
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
 
For scholars and scientists, paper is not an end but a means. It has
served us well for several millenia, but it would have been suprising
indeed if this man-made medium had turned out to be optimal for all
time. In reality, paper has always had one notable drawback. Although
it allowed us to encode, preserve and share ideas and findings
incomparably more effectively than we could ever have done orally, its
tempo was always lamentably slower than the oral interactions to which
the speed of thought seems organically adapted. Electronic journals
have now made it possible for scholarly publication to escape this
rate-limiting constraint of the paper medium, allowing scholarly
communication to become much more rapid, global and interactive than
ever before. It is important that we not allow the realization
of the new medium's revolutionary potential to be retarded by clinging
superstitiously to familiar but incidental features of the paper
medium.
 
It is also useful to remind ourselves now and again why scholars and
scientists do what they do, rather than going straight into the junk
bond market: They presumably want to contribute to mankind's cumulative
knowledge. They have to make a living too, of course, but if doing that
as comfortably and prosperously as possible were their primary motive
they could surely find better ways. Prestige no doubt matters too, but
here again there are less rigororous roads one might have taken than
that of learned inquiry. So scholars publish not primarily to pad
their CVs or to earn royalties on their words, but to inform their peers
of their findings, and to be informed by them in turn, in that
collaborative, interactive spiral whereby mankind's knowledge
increases. My own estimate is that the new medium has the potential to
extend individual scholars' intellectual life-lines (i.e., the
magnitude of their lifelong contribution) by an order of magnitude.
 
What scholars accordingly need is electronic journals that provide:
(1) rapid, expert peer-review, (2) rapid copy-editing, proofing and
publication of accepted articles, (3) rapid, interactive, peer
commentary, and (4) a permanent, universally accessible, searchable and
retrievable electronic archive. Ideally, the true costs of providing
these services should be subsidized by Universities, Learned Societies,
Libraries and the Government, but if they must be passed on to the
"scholar-consumer," let us make sure that they are only the real costs,
and not further unnecessary ones arising from emulating inessential
features of the old medium. PSYCOLOQUY, sponsored by the American
Psychological Association and co-edited and archived at Princeton and
Rutgers Universities, is attempting to provide a model for future
scholarly electronic journals of this kind.
 
              REFERENCES
 
Garfield, E. (1991) Electronic journals and skywriting: A complementary
medium for scientific communication? Current Contents 45: 9-11,
November 11 1991
 
Harnad, S. (1979) Creative disgareement. The Sciences 19: 18 - 20.
 
Harnad, S. (ed.) (1982) Peer commentary on peer review: A case study in
scientific quality control, New York: Cambridge University Press.
 
Harnad, S. (1984) Commentaries, opinions and the growth of scientific
knowledge. American Psychologist 39: 1497 - 1498.
 
Harnad, S. (1985) Rational disgreement in peer review. Science,
Technology and Human Values 10: 55 - 62.
 
Harnad, S. (1986) Policing the Paper Chase. (Review of S. Lock, A
difficult balance: Peer review in biomedical publication.)
Nature 322: 24 - 5.
 
Harnad, S. (1990) Scholarly Skywriting and the Prepublication Continuum
of Scientific Inquiry. Invited Commentary on: William Gardner:  The
Electronic Archive: Scientific Publishing for the 90s Psychological
Science 1: 342 - 343 (reprinted in Current Contents 45: 9-13, November
11 1991).
 
Harnad, S. (1991) Post-Gutenberg Galaxy: The Fourth Revolution in the
Means of Production of Knowledge. Public-Access Computer Systems Review
2 (1): 39 - 53 (also reprinted in PACS Annual Review Volume 2
1992; and in R. D. Mason (ed.) Computer Conferencing: The Last Word. Beach
Holme Publishers, 1992; and in A. L. Okerson (ed.) Directory of
Electronic Journals, Newsletters, and Academic Discussion Lists, 2nd
edition. Washington, DC, Association of Research Libraries, Office of
Scientific & Academic Publishing, 1992).
 
Harnad, S. (1992) Interactive Publication: Extending the
American Physical Society's Discipline-Specific Model for Electronic
Publishing. Serials Review, Special Issue on Economics Models for
Electronic Publishing, pp. 58 - 61.
 
Katz, W. (1991) The ten best magazines of 1990.
Library Journal 116: 48 - 51.
 
Mahoney, M.J. (1985) Open Exchange and Epistemic Progress.
American Psychologist 40: 29 - 39.
 
Wilson, D. L. (1991) Testing time for electronic journals.
Chronicle of Higher Education September 11 1991: A24 - A25.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
ASIS 1992 SESSIONS ON "FULL-TEXT ELECTRONIC ACCESS TO PERIODICALS"
 
The ASIS Special Interest Group on Library Automation and Networking
(SIG/LAN) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) are
sponsoring two sessions on "Full-Text Electronic Access to
Periodicals" at the 1992 ASIS Annual Meeting.  The first session will
deal with recent developments, the second with strategies for improving
access.  The scope of the discussion will include both
periodicals distributed solely or primarily in electronic form, as
well as print periodicals for which an electronic equivalent is
available.  Both scholarly and non-scholarly publications will be
considered.
 
The 55th ASIS Annual Meeting  will be held at the Pittsburgh Hilton,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 26-29, 1992.
 
I.  Full-Text Electronic Access to Periodicals: Recent Developments
 
    Moderator: Ann Okerson, Association of Research Libraries
 
    1. Overview of the Current Marketplace
         Speaker: Carol Tenopir, University of Hawaii
 
    2. Developing and Managing an Electronic Journal
         Speaker: John Unsworth, North Carolina State University
 
    3. Recent Developments at CARL
         Speaker: Ward Shaw, CARL Systems, Inc.
 
II. Full-Text Electronic Access to Periodicals: Strategies for
    Implementation
 
    Moderator: Merri Beth Lavagnino, University of Vermont
 
    1. Technology to Support Full-Text Electronic Access to Periodicals
         Speaker: Clifford Lynch, Division of Library Automation,
                      University of California
 
    2. What Scholars Want and Need from Electronic Journals
         Speaker: Stevan Harnad, Princeton University
 
    3. Libraries and the Electronic Journal
         Speaker: Ann Okerson, Association of Research Libraries
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:18:28 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Michael Friedman 
Subject:      Definition of electronic journal
In-Reply-To:  "(David Robison)"'s message of Thu,
              15 Oct 1992 14:41:32 EDT
              <9210151854.AA11253@gatekeeper.oracle.com>
 
 
 
In reply to David Robison, say you RECEIVE the fax on a fax modem?  Say that
the original was paper?
 
Mike
 
-------------------- Beginning of Forwarded Message --------------------
 From: "(David Robison)" 
 ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 To my mind, an electronic journal is one that can be read (or
 listened to for the blind) in its electronic form. So something
 distributed on CD-ROM (and delivered by FedEx, etc.) is an
 e-journal if you read it through electronic means. A fax
 on the other hand is not, even if it was sent from the
 electronic form through a fax modem.  I would consider such
 a beast a *paper copy* of an e-journal.
 
 David F.W. Robison                   Internet: drobison@library.berkeley.edu
 Editor, Current Cites                  Bitnet: drobison@ucblibra
 Library Technology Watch Program        Voice: (510)642-7600
 UC Berkeley Library                       Fax: (510)643-7891
 Berkeley, CA 94720
 
-------------------- End of Forwarded Message ------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:18:59 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KINGH@SNYSYRV1.BITNET
Subject:      Continuing discussion on costs and benefits of e-journals
 
One of the assumptions about electronic publishing is that speed is a primary
benefit.  What is the advantage of speed --quick turnaround?  OK, for authors
with a really big discovery, speed is desirable to assure they "stake their
claim."  ("Staking one's claim" cannot be perceived as altruistic in any but
the broadest sense or even justice if two or more make the same discovery but
only one knows the ropes or has the contacts to assure the earliest publication)
        In what other sense is speed a desirable reason for promoting
electronic publishing?  How many times has new information or data been
immediately applied to solve a problem or answer a question?  Usually, a
period of review, criticism, and validation is required before using newly
published information.
        And, of course, we need to assess the ability of the human brain to
process more information faster.  Speed could just as easily become the bane
of electronic publishing as the boon.
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 10:17:24 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741" 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
 
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University
 
I want to emphasize that I think Howard Pasternack is quite correct on the
point that in a relatively short time we will be seeing communication on the
net that is much more than ASCII; compound documents is the jargon phrase,
and they will include graphics, sound and moving images.
 
Even if not that complex, we can expect to see publications (and I think the
OCLC clinical trials is already doing this) that are not sequences of text
characters but graphic images of text so that they can be blown up, reduced,
have pictures on the same page, and the like.  I've already seen a print
chemistry journal that comes with a Mac disk in the back of each issue with
software to allow manipulation of molecular diagrams; this sort of thing is
bound to be on the net in due course.
 
How that feeds into what librarians will or will not do is another question,
one the librarians amongst us are agonizing over.
 
--pg
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 11:48:21 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(James J. O'Donnell)" 
Subject:      advantages of speed
In-Reply-To:  <9210221228.AB12797@mail.sas.upenn.edu>; from
              "KINGH%SNYSYRV1.BITNET@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU" at Oct 22, 92 8:18 am
 
It's not primarily, and hardly at all, staking a claim that makes speed a
valuable quality.  Knowing what others are doing makes my own work
timelier and better.  I published in 1979 a book which was barely able to
take into account a book published in Munich in 1973:  such are the
natural delays of the old technology, and I regret my book was not
improved by access.  Further:  I have just this month published a large
book which people will *now* begin to talk about.  I shipped it to the
publisher, already under contract two years ago:  that's two years of my
life lost to the discussion, and the material is all just that much more
remote from my current concerns.  And *this* in fields where research is
fairly cheap and results relatively non-urgent.
 
Jim O'Donnell
Classics, U. of Penn.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 14:44:35 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Debra Schneider 
Subject:      Re: Continuing discussion on costs and benefits of e-journals
In-Reply-To:  Message of Thu, 22 Oct 1992 08:18:59 EDT from 
 
Our nursing honor society is developing an electronic journal for the
clinical practitioner.  One of the reasons we have chosen the electronic
format is that the bedside nurse will be able to access the journal from
the nursing station.  We also feel that the elimination of lost issues,
missing pages, and speed of delivery are important.
 
More importantly, we are trying to develop articles which directly address
clinical issues, while encouraging the input of both researcher and
practitioner.  We feel that moving to an electronic format will help us
break the mold that more traditional publishing venues have established.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 16:15:46 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Richard W Meyer 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
In-Reply-To:  Message of Thu, 22 Oct 1992 10:17:24 EDT from 
 
On Thu, 22 Oct 1992 10:17:24 EDT Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741 said:
>I want to emphasize that I think Howard Pasternack is quite correct on the
>point that in a relatively short time we will be seeing communication on the
>net that is much more than ASCII; compound documents is the jargon phrase,
>and they will include graphics, sound and moving images.
    You may have noted the message from Michigan State that they have an
audio copy of the radio broadcast of the Monday night debate in their
Gopher server.  I didn't keep track of the details cause I don't have
the required Sun or NeXT, but, folks, those days are coming fast...
 
RICHARD W. MEYER                                 TELEPHONE: 512/736-8121
Director of the Library
Trinity University
715 Stadium Dr
SAN ANTONIO, TX 78212                       INTERNET: RMEYER@TRINITY.EDU
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 16:31:23 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was VPIEJ-L@VTVM1
From:         Richard W Meyer 
Subject:      Re: On not sinking the paper fleet...
In-Reply-To:  Message of Thu, 22 Oct 1992 10:17:24 EDT from 
 
If you have a NeXT or a Sun, point your gopher client at gopher.msu.edu and
select 1992 Presidential Debate at MSU - I am listening to a segment of the
debate as I write this.  Incredible!
 
James Powell >>> Library Automation, University Libraries, VPI&SU
             >>> JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU                                   O+>
             >>> jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             >>> Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
    You may have noted the message from Michigan State that they have an
audio copy of the radio broadcast of the Monday night debate in their
Gopher server.  I didn't keep track of the details cause I don't have
the required Sun or NeXT, but, folks, those days are coming fast...
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 20:59:46 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "(CHRIS)" 
Subject:      Report of the Task Force on the Electronic Journal
 
Can anyone tell me how to obtain/purchase a copy of the "Report of the
Task Force on the Electronic Journal"?  My citation from _Library Resources
& Technical Services_ vol 36 #4 Oct 1992 p 477 says it was produced at
University Libraries, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
on April 21, 1991 and May 17, 1991.  Any help would be appreciated.
 
Christopher J. Shaffer
Access Services Dept.
Ralph W. Steen Library
P.O. Box 13055
Stephen F. Austin State U.
Nacogdoches, TX 75962-3055
f_shaffercj@ccsvax.sfasu.edu
(409)568-1837  fax 568-4117
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 21:01:36 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Speed: Boon or Bane
 
Hannah King (SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu)
wrote:
 
> One of the assumptions about electronic publishing is that speed is a
> primary benefit. What is the advantage of speed --quick turnaround? OK,
> for authors with a really big discovery, speed is desirable to assure
> they "stake their claim." ("Staking one's claim" cannot be perceived as
> altruistic in any but the broadest sense or even justice if two or more
> make the same discovery but only one knows the ropes or has the
> contacts to assure the earliest publication)
>
> In what other sense is speed a desirable reason for promoting
> electronic publishing? How many times has new information or data been
> immediately applied to solve a problem or answer a question? Usually, a
> period of review, criticism, and validation is required before using
> newly published information.
>
> And, of course, we need to assess the ability of the human brain to
> process more information faster. Speed could just as easily become the
> bane of electronic publishing as the boon.
 
This is unfortunately not a very realistic picture of scholarly
research, communication or publication. It is mostly not a matter of
big discoveries and priority vs. overhasty reporting of half-baked or
erroneous results. Scholarly research is INTERACTIVE and CUMULATIVE,
and review and criticism is part of the cumulative interaction.
"Scholarly Skywriting" allows this interaction to take place on an
unprecedentedly global scale, while potentially restoring its tempo to
the biologically natural tempo of oral discourse. (Note the
"potentially" -- which it is erroneous to read as "obligatorily" -- as
if phones forbade us to write letters, cars to walk, and telegrams to
sit and reflect. Eugene Garfield made the same mistake in Current
Contents [in his editorial commentary on Harnad 1990, below],
suggesting that the possibility of doing things more quickly will
somehow prevent us from doing them more slowly if we wish!).
 
The most intensive form of prepublication scrutiny is formal peer
review (which itself comes in varying degrees of rigor, peers being
what they are), whose time delays do not correspond to a natural
chronobiological cycle but rather the arbitrary time it takes for the
manuscript to reach the top of the reviewer's stack. The real time
spent actually doing the reviewing is incomparably shorter. The ratio
between the two is of the order of weeks-months to hours-days.
Electronic peer review can only accelerate this essential
quality-control phase if there is the motivation (there are electronic
stacks too), but it does allow editors to cast their nets more widely in
seeking prompt reviews.
 
What is indisputable is that the electronic medium offers the MEANS to
do things much faster; and that, after successful refereeing and
revision, texts can be published virtually instantaneously, and
globally. But the real potential of the electronic medium is in
accelerating the INTERACTIVE phases of scholarly research,
communication and publication, which are really on a continuum (Harnad
1990), and one that has no end, even after "publication." The
electronic network can offer scholars a hierarchy of electronic means
of seeking feedback on their findings, from an unmoderated vanity press
all the way up to the most stringent peer review by the best scholars
in the field.
 
To quote a zealot of my acquaintance:
 
   "The prepublication phase of scientific inquiry, after all, is the
    one in which most of the cognitive work is done. Some of this work
    is relatively noninteractive, to be sure, for example, actually
    executing experiments, running computer simulations or proving
    theorems, but the rest -- from the interplay of the prior ideas out
    of which the experiments were designed and the theories constructed
    to the analysis and interpretation of the findings and their fit to
    the theories -- clearly consists of activities that profit from
    peer feedback. For most investigators the formal submission of a
    manuscript for peer review is not the first stage at which it has
    been subjected to peer scrutiny. That is what all those prior
    discussions and symposia and preprints had been intended to elicit.
    And all this prepublication interaction is clearly continuous with
    the lapidary stage at which the manuscript -- usually further
    revised in response to peer review -- is accepted and archived in
    print. Nor does it really end there, for of course the literature
    may respond to a contribution directly or indirectly for years to
    come, and there are even ways of soliciting postpublication
    feedback in the form of "open peer commentary" ["Scholarly
    Skywriting," which now] offers the possibility of accelerating
    scholarly communication to something closer to the speed of thought
    while adding a globally interactive dimension that makes the medium
    radically different from any other." (Harnad 1990)
 
   "Why do scholars and scientists publish? Although there are no doubt
    careerists among their ranks whose primary interest is to enhance
    their resumes for professional advancement or perhaps even to
    market their words, surely the motive of the true scholar/scientist
    is to advance human inquiry. And, just as surely, such an
    enterprise is and always has been a collective, cumulative and
    collaborative one: Scholars publish in order to inform their peers
    of their findings and, equally important, to BE informed by them in
    turn, to INTERACT with them, in the cycles of reciprocal influence
    that constitute an evolving body of scholarly research. In a word,
    the purpose of scholarly publication is COMMUNICATION --  with
    peers, and for posterity.
 
   "Nor are scientists solipsistic aquarellists, portraying and
    displaying the world as they see it and then retiring to their
    studios to create another impression (I doubt that this hermetic
    stereotype applies even to painters): Scientists read and report
    results because they are communicating with one another, and
    communication is reciprocal.  Scientific publication evolved out of
    scholarly letter-writing, in which thinkers corresponded
    informally, sharing and discussing their latest findings. Elsewhere
    (Harnad 1991) I have discussed how both the scope and the pace of
    this unique form of human interaction were shaped by the biological
    as well as the technological evolution of the media of
    communication. In a nutshell, the speed of thought was first
    adapted to the tempo of speech, then slowed to the rate of
    hand-writing and the turnaround time of letters; its scope was then
    enhanced by printing, but the turnaround time was still hopelessly
    out of phase with the speech-paced potential of creative thought.
 
   "And, until the recent advent of electronic communication, that's
    how it stood, with scholars waiting months, years or longer for the
    literature to respond to their work. How often in the history of
    human inquiry to date did the critical cycle of potential peer
    interaction fade out altogether, because by the time the other shoe
    finally dropped the author's mind was already focused on something
    else? No one can say, but this is precisely where the true
    revolutionary potential of the new medium lies: It can extend an
    individual's scholarly lifeline by an order of magnitude, giving a
    new lease on life to all those stillborn ideas and findings by
    making peer feedback available at a speed that is commensurate with
    the speed of thought (and the finite lifetime of a newborn
    brainchild), all at a global scale that is entirely without
    precedent in human communication." (Harnad 1992)
 
All three papers referred to are available by anonymous ftp from
host: princeton.edu
directory: pub/harnad/Harnad
 
    Harnad, S. (1990) Scholarly Skywriting and the Prepublication
    Continuum of Scientific Inquiry. Psychological Science 1: 342 - 343
    (reprinted in Current Contents 45: 9-13, November 11 1991).
filename: harnad90.skywriting
 
    Harnad, S. (1991) Post-Gutenberg Galaxy: The Fourth Revolution in
    the Means of Production of Knowledge. Public-Access Computer
    Systems Review 2 (1): 39 - 53 (also reprinted in PACS Annual Review
    Volume 2 1992; and in R. D. Mason (ed.) Computer Conferencing: The
    Last Word.  Beach Holme Publishers, 1992; and in A. L. Okerson
    (ed.) Directory of Electronic Journals, Newsletters, and Academic
    Discussion Lists, 2nd edition. Washington, DC, Association of
    Research Libraries, Office of Scientific & Academic Publishing,
    1992).
filename: harnad91.postgutenberg
 
    Harnad, S. (1992) Interactive Publication: Extending the American
    Physical Society's Discipline-Specific Model for Electronic
    Publishing. Serials Review, Special Issue on Economics Models for
    Electronic Publishing, pp. 58 - 61.
filename: harnad92.interactivpub
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Oct 1992 21:02:26 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         GMP@PSUVM.PSU.EDU
Subject:      Re: Speed: Boon or Bane
In-Reply-To:  harnad AT Princeton.EDU -- Thu, 22 Oct 92 19:23:24 EDT
 
    Take electronic publishing for what it is worth.  It is a valid outlet
for people who like to write first drafts and who dread editing.  It is
a way of finding catharsis.  It is a way of saying it whether someone is
listening or not.  In short, it is convenient, but not particularly
practical.
 
    It took fully ten minutes to reduce the page I had written to the above
paragraph, but the, I am a print editor.
 
Gerald M. Phillips, Trade Publications
Hampton Press
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Oct 1992 15:34:07 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         LMACKLIN@UNTVAX.BITNET
Subject:      Re: Report of the Task Force on the Electronic Journal
 
Gail McMillian, Serials Team Leader at Virginia Polytech Institute presented
the findings of the VPI&SU Task Force on the Electronic Journal at the 1991
North American Serials Interest Group Conference.  She may be able to provide
the text of her presentation (which was very good!).  Her bitnet address is:
GMCMILLA@VTVM1.  Her internet address is:  GMCMILLA@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU.
 
Gail also served as a guest editor for a regular column in _Serials Review_
which also discusses the findings of the task force.  Each of the task force
members contributed to the column.  The issue is _Serials Review_ v.17 no. 4
1991, p. 77.  The title of the column is "The Balance Point:  Electronic
Journals:  Considerations for the Present and Future."  It is a good article
and represents a variety of viewpoints from librarians with different
responsibilities at VPI&SU.
 
Hope this information is helpful.
 
Lisa A. Macklin
Serials Records Librarian
University of North Texas Libraries
LMACKLIN@UNTVAX.BITNET
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Oct 1992 07:40:48 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Steve Koski 
Subject:      Re: Continuing discussion on costs and benefits of e-journa
 
> From:          KINGH%SNYSYRV1.BITNET@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
 
> One of the assumptions about electronic publishing is that speed is a primary
> benefit.  What is the advantage of speed --quick turnaround?  OK, for authors
> with a really big discovery, speed is desirable to assure they "stake their
> claim."  ("Staking one's claim" cannot be perceived as altruistic in any but
> the broadest sense or even justice if two or more make the same discovery but
> only one knows the ropes or has the contacts to assure the earliest
 publication)
>         In what other sense is speed a desirable reason for promoting
> electronic publishing?  How many times has new information or data been
> immediately applied to solve a problem or answer a question?  Usually, a
> period of review, criticism, and validation is required before using newly
> published information.
>         And, of course, we need to assess the ability of the human brain to
> process more information faster.  Speed could just as easily become the bane
> of electronic publishing as the boon.
>
 
Hannah King raises an interesting point.  However, I would like to
note that one of the deficiencies of paper journal publication,
especially for the most important journals, is the lag time between
acceptance of an article and publication.  A two-year delay is common
and not very beneficial to colateral researchers.  E-journals may
demonstrate that such delays are unnecessary.  I find myself
wondering, also, whether a significant amount of research is
rejected, not because it is poor research, but because there is no
more room in a 1200-page research volume.  E-journals should not only
be faster, thus research becomes available to researchers
investigating similar questions more quickly, but the available-space
barrier would also be broken because electronic storage is more cost
effective.
 
 
 
Steven D. Koski,
Russell J. Jandoli Department
of Journalism and Mass Communication,
St. Bonaventure University,
St. Bonaventure, New York 14778
 
(716)  375-2520
FAX (716) 375-2389
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Oct 1992 07:42:01 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      On the Intrinsic vs. the Extrinsic Rewards of Scholarship
 
> Date:         Fri, 23 Oct 1992 15:44:45 -0500
> From: mmurrain@HAMP.HAMPSHIRE.EDU Michelle Murrain Hampshire College
>
> I must beg to differ on one point here. Not all of us who want or need
> to "enhance [our] resumes for professional advancement" are not "true
> scholar/scientist[s]"! I am a lowly assistant professor who has no
> choice but to publish for my job security. When I get tenure, I'll have
> more luxury! So this brings up my question. I consider my involvement
> in electronic networks as essential to my work, yet, of course I get no
> credit for my long postings on the AIDS list (my research area), or
> such things. And until the electronic journals are listed in MEDLINE,
> etc.. publishing in them won't help either.  Any ideas or suggestions?
 
There are at least two ways to advance one's academic career: (1) The
direct, black-box way is to focus on extending the pertinent line-items
on one's CV. (2) The indirect way is to do and report high quality
scholarly work and let the line-items worry about themselves. At this
early stage of its evolution, the Net provides revolutionary
possibilties in the service of (2) but it's a much less certain ally
for (1). Caveat emptor. I consider it a virtue of the Net that its
aboriginal reward structure will tend to tilt its development and set
its course along the lines of (2) as a model rather than one. Whether
one uses it for unmoderated brainstorming or formally refereed (but not
as surely rewarded) publication, the Net offers unprecedented
intellectual possibilities in the service of the intrinsic, if not yet
the extrinsic, goals of scholarly inquiry.
 
 
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Oct 1992 07:46:57 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Symposium Announcement
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       AN IMPORTANT MEETING AND LEARNING EVENT
 
 
         ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH LIBRARIES
      ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PRESSES
 
               In Collaboration With:
 
           The American Mathematical Society
            The National Science Foundation
 
 
SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING ON THE ELECTRONIC NETWORKS:
               the New Generation:
 
Visions and Opportunities in Not-for-Profit Publishing
 
 
 
            Hands-on Network Tutorials
                 New Experiments
              Electronic Text Issues
              Copyright & Licensing
 
 
 
                 December 5-8, 1992
              The Washington Vista Hotel
                  Washington, DC
 
 
 
This three-day symposium is specifically aimed at the not-for-profit,
academic community:
 
o  University Presses
o  Learned and professional society publishers
o  Librarians working with electronic texts
o  Faculty and researchers interested in scholarly communications
o  E-journal editors thinking LISTSERV and beyond
 
 
The symposium's objective is to promote information-sharing
and discussion among people interested in developing the
potential of the networks, particularly for not-for-profit
formal scholarly publishing.  It will also focus on discussions
about developing collaborative plans for sharing networked
publishing expertise among the academic publishing chain.
Participants will discuss some of the latest research and
development from the not-for-profit sector, including work
funded by the National Science Foundation and prominent
societies and consortia.
 
The First and stellar Symposium was held in April 1992 and featured
first-generation, innovative efforts by pioneers such as Charles Bailey
(PACS), John Unsworth (POSTMODERN CULTURE), Stevan Harnad
(Psycoloquy), and OCLC, as well as other colleagues.  This group of
presentations, in-depth questioning and discussion will focus on models
and plans for "second-generation" work.  A one-day segment will feature
hands-on tutorials on internet connected labs at the University of
Maryland.
 
Date:  December 5-8, 1992.
Location:  The Washington Vista Hotel, 15th and M Streets,
NW, Washington, DC  20005;
 
 
E-mail address for inquiries:  symposium@e-math.ams.com
Fax inquiries:                 Ann Okerson:  202-462-7849
Phone inquiries:               Virginia Blodgett:  202-232-2466
 
We can send you the full program by e-mail, along with registration forms
 
 
Coordinators:  Ann Okerson, Association of Research Libraries
	       David Rodgers, American Mathematical Society
	       Planning committee of the Association of American
               University Presses
 
Fee:  $375.00 (Saturday afternoon through Tuesday afternoon, including
      many meals)
 
LIMITED REGISTRATION
 
 
Highlighted speakers and presentations include:
 
 
Yuri Rubinsky, President, SoftQuad, Toronto.
 
James J. O'Donnell, Classics, University of Pennsylvania.
 
John Black, Chief Librarian, Guelph University.
 
Daniel L. Solomon, Department of Statistics, North Carolina
State University.  "Starting a New Journal in Statistics
Education."
 
Bernie Rous, Associate Director of Publications, Association
for Computing Machinery.  "Electronic Publishing:  A Five-
Year Plan."
 
Michael Van Steenberg, NASA.  "Astronomy Journals Online:  A
STELAR Project."
 
Terri Harrison & Tim Stephen, Communications Department,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  "Building Electronic
Organizations the COMSERVE Way."
 
Susan Hockey, Director, Center for Electronic Texts in the
Humanities (Rutgers/Princeton).  "Encoding Standards:  SGML
and the Text Encoding Initiative: What and Why?"
 
Evan Owens, Information Systems Manager, Journals Division,
University of Chicago Press.  "Electronic Text and Scholarly
Publishers:  How and Why?"
 
Kenneth Arnold, Director, Rutgers University Press.  "The
Scholarly Monograph Is Dead.  Long Live the Scholary
Monograph."
 
Elli Mylonas:  The Perseus Project; Interactive Sources and
Studies on Ancient Greece. (A consortial hypertext project
published by Yale University Press)
 
David Rodgers:  The AMS Electronic Publishing Experiment; A
New Vision of the Scientific Journal.
 
Michael Van Steenberg:  Astronomy Journals Bit-mapped and
Beyond;  Converting Paper Images.  (The American Astronomical
Society and NASA and publishers)
 
Robert Oakley, Head, Georgetown Law Library
 
Anita Lowry, Head, Electronic Text Service, Columbia
University Libraries
 
 
PLEASE JOIN US FOR AN ENRICHING, VARIED, COLLABORATIVE, COLLEGIAL
MEETING.  LUNCHES TOGETHER; DINNERS IN SMALL GROUPS; MANY
OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISCUSSION IN SMALL SETTINGS; ASK QUESTIONS
OF SOME OF TODAY'S HIGHLY INNOVATIVE, NETWORKED PUBLISHERS.
 
ENROLMENT LIMITED.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Oct 1992 08:11:25 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      San Francisco Lodging Sought
 
 
I will be in San Francisco from November 16-20, 1992
and am in looking for free or cheap lodging (under
25$/day).
 
If there is anyone living in the San
Francisco/Oakland/Berkeley area that is aware of
where I could find reasonable lodging please contact
me.
 
During this time I will be free to talk on the following
subjects, if it should be of interest to your department;
network-accessible electronic serials, network-
accessible resources in religious studies, the Net as a
research and publication forum/tool, and patron-client
dynamics in antiquity.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Oct 1992 15:33:12 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: Continuing discussion on costs and benefit
 
 
Speed is often perceived as important by scholars concerned only
with using traditional media, and not pioneering or justifying new media.
I believe I've seen several journals with "rapid communication" in
their subtitle or short description.  And of course there are sections
in journals like *Nature* that are designed for rapid publication.
(Maybe a serials person could comment?)
 
Even in the humanities this is a concern, as O'Donnell points out.
For instance, in my field, philosophy, I can think of two journals,
"Analysis" and "Philosophical Studies", that I believe were intended to
improve considerably on the lengthy turn-around for other philosophy
journals.  And philosophy, of course, makes *no* new discoveries, being
only a series of footn...&c.
 
Maybe these scholars are mistaken in their evaluation of the importance
of speed.  But I don't think so.  I do think that it has something to
with attempting to realize some of the advantages of conversation.  (as
Harnad, I think, pointed out).  And this makes sense for philosophy as
philosophical discourse (historically certainly and currently I think as
well) gives a special place to face-to-face oral conversation.
 
Obviously some intellectual projects benefit more from rapid turn-around
than others.  Analytic epistemology or philosopical logic are natural
candidates for a near-conversational medium.  Historical commentary or
large scale system construction might not find it so useful.
 
But would I have predicted the intense traffice found on
IOUDAIOS (Hellenistic Judaism) or ANSAX-L (Anglo-Saxon Literature
and History)?  Nope.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Oct 1992 08:15:25 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KINGH@SNYSYRV1.BITNET
Subject:      Re: Continuing discussion on costs and benefits of e-journals
 
We've been working with our nursing school and nursing staff development to
increase their access to electronic resources.  However, there are several
reasons we would NOT recommend an electronic journal for nurses that is not
also made available in print format.
        If there are only a few computers in the nursing stations, no nurse
can tie up limited resources to read an e-newsletter, particularly if the
computers or terminals are used for patient orders and other documentation.
We've discovered that nurses on our floors are wasting time in queues to
access computers for mandatory charging, checking patient information, and
documentation.  Bedside terminals are needed but not affordable.
        Nurses, rarely the first to obtain enhanced and expensive technologies,
have not had the opportunity to become familiar with cmputers for accessing
resources in electronic format.  They tend, therefore, to need time to
practice and educate themselves with what is now a foreign technology.  Time
is just what these dynamos who are attending classes, working doubles, and
raising children lack.
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Oct 1992 10:17:42 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Debra Schneider 
Subject:      Re: Continuing discussion on costs and benefits of e-journals
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue, 27 Oct 1992 08:15:25 EST from 
 
I am concerned about Hannah King's response that and electronic journal
is inappropriate for nurses because they don't have a lot of time and
hospitals are unwilling to invest money in equipment.  We are aware
that these two problems present potential barriers for access.  However,
the idea for an electronic journal came from the membership of Sigma
Theta Tau (an association of over 170,000 nurses).  These members feel
it is essential for them to be on the "cutting edge" of technology
and that they will find the time and means to access this type
of product.
 
Someone used an analogy that the e-journal is the horseless carriage.
I think it's rather silly to get a horseless carriage and then also
supply a horse to pull it "just in case".

__________________________________________________________________

James Powell