VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

February 1993

=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Feb 1993 13:09:33 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Bradford A. Morgan" 
 
 
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
 
POSITION VACANCY
 
VICE PRESIDENT
 
An academic vice president is sought for this public science and engineering
university dedicated to excellence.  The 2,500 undergraduate and graduate
students are involved in 32 degree programs, through the Ph.D. in some
disciplines.  Students have combined average ACT scores of 25.
 
 Located in the Black Hills near Mount Rushmore and the Badlands, and not
far from the Big Horn Mountain Range of Wyoming, greater Rapid City is a
community of 85,000 with a favorable quality-of-life/cost-of-living ratio in
a forested setting with ponderosa pines, Black Hills spruce, hiking trail
networks, dinosaur relics, Sioux tradition, and national caves.
 
APPLICATIONS and NOMINATIONS
 
The selection of the Vice President of the South Dakota School of Mines
and Technology should serve to impact the institution to better effect a
positive environment by promoting professional development and global
telecommunications, including the following criteria:
 
1.  An awareness of innovative learning methodologies existing in the
engineering, science, and humanities curricula elsewhere and their
transferability to curricula here.
2.  An awareness of computer communications such as the Internet which
has particular impact on overcoming geographical isolation
experienced by students and faculty at this institution.
3.  The willingness to support faculty as they innovatively explore new
teaching/learning strategies.
4.  An awareness of faculty development programs which seek to
strengthen classroom teaching and research abilities.
5.  A recognition of the necessity for developing on-going and continual
faculty-student-administrative dialogue on issues of all kinds as they both
affect these groups and as they pertain to a stimulating environment
intellectually for these groups.
6.  An awareness of the complexity of issues and the willingness to take
risks which push our institution into the national area as a premier
undergraduate institution.
7.  A desire to cultivate and affirm diverse attitudes, personalities, ideas,
and temperaments to benefit students and faculty alike, allowing us to grow
in social consciousness and awareness complementary to our solid scientific
and technical backgrounds.
 
Candidates for the position must have an earned doctorate in a discipline
of engineering or science and possess the administrative experience
necessary.  Nominations will be accepted.
 
Applicants should submit a cover letter explaining interest in the
position along with names, addresses, and phone numbers of at least
five references, and a statement of goals, to:
 
        Dr. Douglas K. Lange and Dr. Harold D. Orville
        Co-Chairs, VP Search and Screen Committee
        South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
        501 E. St. Joseph Street
        Rapid City, SD 57701-3995
 
Review of the applications begins February 15, 1993, and will continue
until a suitable candidate is hired.   An Equal Opportunity Employer.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Feb 1993 13:10:26 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Increase in Journals citation
 
I read an article that quoted a (female?) author as saying that e-journals
would result in less, not more journals over time (if i recall correctly).
I have managed to successfully misplace this article. Does anyone know
which article this quote appeared in or which article was being quoted?
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 1 Feb 1993 13:11:07 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         jbcondat@attmail.com
Subject:      New French Computer Security E-Journal
In-Reply-To:  your message  of Fri Jan 29 08:02:37 EST 1993
 
Bonjour!
 
A new computer security e-journal is already published in France. It's the
first in my country:
 
     * weekly;
     * name: _Chaos Digest_;
     * last issue available: #1.06 (1 Fev 1993);
     * for a subscription send an e-message to: jbcondat@attmail.com
 
If you can diffuse this e-journal throughout your site, don't hesitate to
contact me, ok?
 
Thanks, and hope to hear from you soon!
 
jbc
--
   _-_|\    Jean-Bernard Condat
  /     \   Chaos Computer Club France [CCCF]    B.P. 8005
  \_.-*_/   E-Mail: jbcondat@attmail.com         69351 Lyon Cedex 08, France
       v    Phone:  +33 1 47874083               Fax:  +33 1 47877070
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Feb 1993 08:01:27 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      First e-serial in France and Minitel
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon,
              1 Feb 1993 13:11:07 EST from 
 
I find it amazing that the first e-serial in France should only just
appear in 1993, considering the size and age of Minitel. Does anyone
have any comments on why this should be so?
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Feb 1993 08:06:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         jbcondat@attmail.com
Subject:      How can I distribute my e-journal?
In-Reply-To:  your message  of Mon Feb  1 13:10:26 EST 1993
 
Bonjour!
 
Since the beginning of this year, I edit and diffuse a new computer security
e-journal. It's the first experience like that in my country, and it's work
extremely good.
 
_Chaos Digest_, a weekly e-journal (circa 28,000 in size pro issue), is
available by free subscription at jbcondat@attmail.com. All day, I receive 15
requests of subscription and cannot process manually to the distribution of
each issue.
 
Could you please help me and give me the opportunity to diffuse this e-journal
by one (revised) listserv system?  We don't have like a system at this time in
France!
 
Thanks, and hope to hear from you soon!
 
jbc
--
   _-_|\    Jean-Bernard Condat
  /     \   Chaos Computer Club France [CCCF]    B.P. 8005
  \_.-*_/   E-Mail: jbcondat@attmail.com         69351 Lyon Cedex 08, France
       v    Phone:  +33 1 47874083               Fax:  +33 1 47877070
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Feb 1993 13:33:57 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Itamar Even-Zohar,
              Porter Chair of Semiotics" 
Subject:      Re: First e-serial in France and Minitel
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              2 Feb 1993 08:01:27 EST from <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
 
On Tue, 2 Feb 1993 08:01:27 EST MICHAEL STRANGELOVE said:
>
>I find it amazing that the first e-serial in France should only just
>appear in 1993, considering the size and age of Minitel. Does anyone
>have any comments on why this should be so?
>
>
>Michael Strangelove
>Department of Religious Studies
>University of Ottawa
>
>         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
>         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
>         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
>         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
>         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
 
 
I would like to second this intriguing question!
 
Itamar Even-Zohar
Porter Chair of Semiotics
Tel Aviv University
b10@taunivm.bitnet / itiez@ccsg.tau.ac.il
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 2 Feb 1993 13:34:36 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joe Raben 
Subject:      Re: First e-serial in France and Minitel
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              2 Feb 1993 08:01:27 EST from <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
 
It just seems to me, Michael, that French >academics< are less turned on
to netting than other nationalities, and they may not see Minitel as a
meaningful >scholarly< medium. While SCHOLAR had at latest count 67 sub-
scribers in Britain, 83 in Canada, 49 in the Netherlands, 31 in Australia,
and 18 in Japan, only 6 have signed up so far in France, and my associates
there ask me to send them faxes!
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 3 Feb 1993 08:54:53 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         zeide@uamont.edu
Subject:      RE: Increase in Journals citation
 
Dear Michael,
I wouldn't worry about that paper authored by a female. No references
are needed to demonstrate the point. The very nature of electronic
communications will lead to a single journal, or electronic library.
In another sense, there will be as many journals as readers because
each of us will create his/her profile for reading.
Sincerely,
Boris Zeide
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 3 Feb 1993 08:55:24 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Editors of PMC 
Subject:      PMC 3.2 available.
 
The January, 1993 issue of PMC is available: an abbreviated table of contents
follows.  Please let others know, as you see fit.
 
John Unsworth
Co-editor, _Postmodern Culture_
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 
 
POSTMODERNCULTUREPOSTMODERNCULTURE
P       RNCU   REPO   ODER       E            P O S T M O D E R N
P  TMOD RNCU  U EP S  ODER  ULTU E               C U L T U R E
P       RNCU  UR  OS  ODER  ULTURE
P  TMODERNCU  UREPOS  ODER  ULTU E          an electronic journal
P  TMODERNCU  UREPOS  ODER       E           of interdisciplinary
POSTMODERNCULTUREPOSTMODERNCULTURE                      criticism
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Volume 3, Number 2 (January, 1993)                ISSN: 1053-1920
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
                            CONTENTS
 
AUTHOR & TITLE                                              FN FT
 
Masthead, Contents, and                              CONTENTS 193
     Instructions for retrieving files
 
Barrett Watten, "Post-Soviet Subjectivity"             WATTEN 193
 
Arkadii Dragomoshchenko, from _Phosphor_.  Tr.       DRAGOMOS 193
     Lyn Hejinian and Elena Balashova
 
Jerome McGann, Vitaly Chernetsky,                    SYMPOS-1 193
     Arkadii Dragomoshchenko, Mikhail Epstein,
     Lyn Hejinian, Bob Perelman, Marjorie
     Perloff, A Symposium on Russian
     Postmodernism, Oct. 26-Nov. 25, 1992
 
Marjorie Perloff, and Mikhail Epstein, two           SYMPOS-2 193
     draft essays circulated as part of
     Postmoder Culture's symposium on Russian
     Postmodernism
 
Vladislav Todorov, "The Four Luxembourgs"             TODOROV 193
     (fiction)
 
Wendy Wahl, "Bodies and Technologies: _Dora_,            WAHL 193
     _Neuromancer_, and Strategies of
     Resistance"
 
Alan Aycock, "Derrida/Fort-da: Deconstructing          AYCOCK 193
     Play"
 
Kathleen Burnett, "Towards a Theory of                BURNETT 193
     Hypertextual Design"
 
 
POPULAR CULTURE COLUMN:
 
Honoria, "Introducing Mail Art: A Karen Elliot
     interview with Crackerjack Kid and Honoria"     POP-CULT 193
 
 
REVIEWS:
 
Stuart Moulthrop, "Deuteronomy Comix."  A review
     of Neal Stephenson's _Snow Crash_.              REVIEW-1 193
 
Jon Thompson, "Consuming Megalopolis."  A review
     of Celeste Olalquiaga's _Megalopolis:
     Contemporary Cultural Sensibilities_.           REVIEW-2 193
 
Philip E. Agre, "Sustainability and Critique."
     A review of Will Wright's _Wild Knowledge:
     Science, Language, and Social Life in a
     Fragile Environment_.                           REVIEW-3 193
 
Susan J. Ritchie, "Constructing an Archipelago:
     Writing the Caribbean."  A review of Antonio
     Benitez-Rojo's _The Repeating Island:
     The Caribbean and the Postmodern
     Perspective_.                                   REVIEW-4 193
 
James Morrison, "Hitchcock: The Industry."  A
     review of Robert E. Kapsis's _Hitchock: The
     Making of a Reputation_.                        REVIEW-5 193
 
Josephine Lee, "Cookbooks for Theory and
     Performance."  A review of Case, Sue-Ellen
     and Janelle Reinelt, eds.  _The Performance
     of Power: Theatrical Discourse and Politics_,
     and Reinelt, Janelle G. and Joseph R. Roach,
     eds.  _Critical Theory and Performance_.        REVIEW-6 193
 
Glen Scott Allen, "Baptismal Eulogies:
     Reconstructing Deconstruction from the
     Ashes."  A review of Jacques Derrida's
     _Cinders_, tr. Ned Lukacher, and Jacques
     Derrida's _The Other Heading: Reflections on
     Today's Europe_, tr. Pascale-Anne Brault &
     Michael B. Naas.                                REVIEW-7 193
 
 
LETTERS:
 
Vaillancourt-Rosenau and Foley, an exchange           LETTERS 193
 
 
NOTICES:
 
Announcements and Advertisements                      NOTICES 193
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 3 Feb 1993 13:21:26 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joo Yun Kim 
Subject:      scholarly e-journals
 
 
 
 
-------------------------TEXT-OF-FORWARDED-MAIL--------------------------------
 
Date:    Tue, 02 Feb 93 20:10 PST
To:      vpiej-l@VTM1.BITNET
From:    Joo Yun Kim                          
Subject: scholarly e-journals
 
I am a library & info. science student at UCLA.  I am researching for a paper
on electronic publishing and its impact on scholarly communication.
 
I would like to know exactly how many "official e-journals" (ie: copyrighted,
w/ISSN number, referreed or edited, etc.) are being produced today.  It would
also be helpful if I could find out how many new journals were created during
the past three to five years.  (Basically, any statistics on the topic of
e-publishing would be helpful.)  Any suggestions on the sources for this
type of information?
 
Also, I was told that the American Chemical Society decided to experiment
with e-publishing a few years ago by encouraging their members to
publish their findings through the networks... I can't seem to find any
reports on the results of this ACS experiment.
 
I would appreciate any suggestions!  Thank you.
 
Joo Cho (Izzypy7@mvs.oac.ucla.edu)
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 4 Feb 1993 08:53:39 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      Re: scholarly e-journals
In-Reply-To:  Message of Wed, 3 Feb 1993 13:21:26 EST from 
 
The third edition of the Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters
will be released in late February. It contains E-serial information,
including ISSN numbers and date of first electronic issue. I have expanded
the entry template to include more information that will allow for easier
and more detailed anaylsis. The following is the template I am using for
the third edition. I will be asking for comments on expanding this information
for the fourth edition some time later this Spring. I am trying to strike a
balance between ease of processing and usability and readability of the
directory. At present, tracking down a new entry, processing and confirming
takes on average 1 hour. The third edition will be mounted on a gopher server,
FTP and LISTSERV fileservers.
____________________________________________________________________________
 
ATTN: I have a fast approaching press deadline so please do not delay
in returning the desired information or your e-serial will not be
mentioned in the forthcoming revision of the _Directory of Electronic
Journals and Newsletters_.
 
 
To the Editor:
 
I am presently updating a comprehensive directory of electronic
journals and newsletters.  This directory is available in e-text
for public dissemination throughout the networks (see below) and is
available in hard copy from the Association of Research
Libraries' Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing.  Thus I am
seeking the following information from journal and newsletter editors:
(USE AS MUCH SPACE AS NECESSARY)
 
NB - Please reply with all text  left-justified (against the left hand
margin), with no tabs. E-mail address should be lower case.
 
Title: (note - place answers against left margin, not beside tags)
 
ISSN #, if any,
 
First Electronic Issue:
 
Peer-Reviewed/Refereed:
 
Formats: (ASCII, Postscript, BinHexed, WP, MAC, so on).
 
Distribution: (e-mail, LISTSERV, Gopher, WAIS, FTP, so on)
 
Periodicity: (irregular, daily, weekly, monthly, ...)
 
Description:
 
To Subscribe/Access:
 
Submissions:
 
Related List or Newsgroup:
 
Back Issues: (if available via FTP, please include directory)
 
Contact:
 
Please send this information in the above format.
Also, PLEASE SEND ME THE LATEST COPY OF YOUR JOURNAL or NEWSLETTER
(but DO NOT subscribe me) this is extremely important.
 
NB - Please do not reply via USENET, as i seldom read newsgroups. Please
     send your entry to the e-mail address below.
 
This information will be made freely available on the Net in ASCII text
and via gopher server.
 
Michael Strangelove
<441495@UOTTAWA>
<441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
 
The _Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters_ is now available
from the Contex-L fileserver and consists of two files.  These may be
obtained by sending the commands (on a VM/CMS system):
 
Tell Listserv at UOttawa Get EJournl1 Directry
Tell Listserv at UOttawa Get EJournl2 Directry
 
From Internet the commands should be send as a mail message to
Listserv@UOTTAWA or LISTSERV@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA
with the commands as the only lines in the body of mail message:
 
GET EJOURNL1 DIRECTRY
GET EJOURNL2 DIRECTRY
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 4 Feb 1993 08:54:04 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: First e-serial in France and Minitel
In-Reply-To:  <93Feb2.151956est.10803@ugw.utcs.utoronto.ca>; from "Itamar
              Even-Zohar,              Porter Chair of Semiotics" at Feb 2,
              93 1:33 pm
 
>
> On Tue, 2 Feb 1993 08:01:27 EST MICHAEL STRANGELOVE said:
> >
> >I find it amazing that the first e-serial in France should only just
> >appear in 1993, considering the size and age of Minitel. Does anyone
> >have any comments on why this should be so?
> >
> >
> >Michael Strangelove
> >Department of Religious Studies
> >University of Ottawa
> >
> >         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
> >         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
> >         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
> >         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
> >         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
>
>
> I would like to second this intriguing question!
>
> Itamar Even-Zohar
> Porter Chair of Semiotics
> Tel Aviv University
> b10@taunivm.bitnet / itiez@ccsg.tau.ac.il
>
There is a second answer to Joe Raben's: to publish on Minitel, one
had to have a periodical number, which explains why so many initial Minitel
services were connected with well known publications such as Le Monde, etc...
This was in response to the newspapeprs's fear of being faced with unfair
competition from the new electronic medium and, in fact, some went so far
as to claim that this was a plot to destroy freedom of the press by
destroying the newspapers themselves. In order to reassure them, the
government forced initial publishers on Minitel (I am using the word
"publisher" in an extrapolated meaning, of course) to be connected with
an existing publication.
 
I don't know if this policy is still in force.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 4 Feb 1993 08:54:29 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Defining E-Serials
 
I am trying to put in writing some of the thinking behind the creation of
the Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters and would appreciate
comments on the following bit of metaphysics from this esteemed gathering.
 
 
* Selection Criteria
 
I have made use of the following guidelines to help me decide what
constitutes an e-serial, and out of the world of e-serials, what
qualifies as an e-journal. In this new medium none of the traditional
categories are entirely adequate, so I doubt that the following will
be entirely satisfactory.
 
The easiest approach to deciding what is an e-serial, is to outline
what it is not. LISTSERV lists, Internet interests groups (same
thing, different software), USENET newsgroups, and computer bulletin
board conferences are not considered e-serials. They are best thought
of as casual or semi-formal electronic conversations. This includes
moderated or digested forms of the above. The only exception to this
that I have made is when these acquire an ISSN number.
 
Also, WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and Telnet databases are not
considered e-serials, although it should be noted that e-serials are
being archived on these Internet-based information servers with
increasing frequency. This is a tricky distinction as some databases,
such as an agricultural news database, may be updated daily with new
information. How long this distinction will remain useful is unknown.
It is certain that any e-serial that chooses to limit itself to
access only through an Internet database server will not be
universally accessible from the rest of the Net. But by the same
token, the commercialization of the Net ensures that we will see a
proliferation of WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and Telnet databases that
contain serials which are accessible only by those with accounts and
a significant disposable income.
 
E-serials included herein are self-defined as e-serials and attempt,
in a variety of ways, to emulate the characteristics of their print
counterparts through organization, periodicity and topical focus
(with the exception of a few LISTSERV lists that are called
newsletters, but are only moderated conversations).
 
E-journals are a subset of e-serials that are not merely
informational in design but make an effort to add to the corpus of
a discipline through the organized dissemination of original research
or knowledge. I have resisted the temptation to use peer-review as
the demarcator here, because it is quite clear that many e-journals
have been (or will be) developed with the intention of providing
alternatives to traditional peer-review processes while at the same
time remaining self-critical of their content.
 
I realize that the traditional taxonomy of periodical literature is
far more refined then my guidelines, but given the small numbers,
youth and dynamic nature of this medium, hyper-classification would
appear to be inappropriate at this early stage in the history of
network-based electronic publishing.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 4 Feb 1993 08:55:57 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Selection Criteria Draft 2.0
 
 
* Selection Criteria
 
I have made use of the following guidelines to help me decide what
constitutes an e-serial, and out of the world of e-serials, what
qualifies as an e-journal. In this new medium none of the traditional
categories are entirely adequate, so I doubt that the following will
be entirely satisfactory.
 
The easiest approach to deciding what is an e-serial, is to outline
what it is not. LISTSERV lists, Internet interests groups (same
thing, different software), USENET newsgroups, and computer bulletin
board conferences are not considered e-serials. They are best thought
of as casual or semi-formal electronic conversations. This includes
moderated or digested forms of the above. The only exception to this
that I have made is when these acquire an ISSN number.
 
Also, WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and Telnet databases are not
considered e-serials, although it should be noted that e-serials are
being archived on these Internet-based information servers with
increasing frequency. This is a tricky distinction as some databases,
such as an agricultural news database, may be updated daily with new
information. How long this distinction will remain useful is unknown.
It is certain that any e-serial that chooses to limit itself to
access only through an Internet database server will not be
universally accessible from the rest of the Net. But by the same
token, the commercialization of the Net ensures that we will see a
proliferation of WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and Telnet databases that
contain serials which are accessible only by those with accounts and
a significant disposable income.
 
E-serials included herein are self-defined as e-serials and attempt,
in a variety of ways, to emulate the characteristics of their print
counterparts through organization, periodicity and topical focus
(with the exception of a few LISTSERV lists that are called
newsletters, but are only moderated conversations).
 
E-journals are a subset of e-serials that are not merely
informational in design but make an effort to add to the corpus of
a discipline through the organized dissemination of original research
or knowledge. I have resisted the temptation to use peer-review as
the demarcator here, because it is quite clear that many e-journals
have been (or will be) developed with the intention of providing
alternatives to traditional peer-review processes while at the same
time remaining self-critical of their content.
 
It should be noted that format is not what defines an e-serial. They
can appear as low ASCII, a Macintsoh HyperCard Stack, or a hypermedia
program.
 
I realize that the traditional taxonomy of periodical literature is
far more refined then my guidelines, but given the small numbers,
youth and dynamic nature of this medium, hyper-classification would
appear to be inappropriate at this early stage in the history of
network-based electronic publishing. The time may come when a
completely new set of catagories arise to replace the familiar
concepts and relationships implied in terms such as author, journal,
editor, publisher, library, subscription, and even base units such
as paragraph, article, chapter, and book.
 
Over classification at this point in time would also deny the
possibility that a new taxonomy is needed for an entirely new form
of emerging communication and literature. Across disciplines, one of
the most common mistakes to be seen is the error of applying
antiquated or inappropriate categories to a new or different context.
(In my work of investigating the anthropological context of
antiquity, I call this phenomenon cultural transference). The usual
effect of this type of ahistorical an mono-cultural perception is the
inability to perceive and analyze change and difference. This would
suggest that the attempt to impose categories from the print world
on the electronic world will have detrimental effects on the
development of this new medium. It is quite clear that the attempt
by some to standardize the new medium will be an act of power - an
attempt to maintain old relationships in a new context.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 5 Feb 1993 08:21:26 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re:  Defining E-Serials
 
Although I agree that peer-review is neither a necessary nor a
sufficient condition either for journalhood or for quality, I do think
peer-reviewed serials should be designated by a category of their own
(at least until any rival forms of quality control have been put to the
empirical test). Otherwise your classification system risks not
providing the kind of filtering criteria people need to weigh how much
and what to read in the growing body of electronic literature.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Cognitive Science Laboratory |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
221 Nassau Street            |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
Princeton NJ 08544-2093      |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
harnad@princeton.edu         |    harnad@rrmone.cnrs-mrs.fr
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 5 Feb 1993 08:22:21 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Brian Nielsen 
Subject:      Re: scholarly e-journals
In-Reply-To:  <01GUBNY7H16U0000GG@nuacc.acns.nwu.edu>; from "Joo Yun Kim" at
              Feb 3, 93 1:21 pm
 
Joo--
        Don't know a better full census than the Strangelove/Okerson one,
available via listserv at uottawa as ejournal1 directry and ejournl2 directry,
last dated 7/92.  You can see a number of them via the CICNet gopher (in
Michigan), where there's been an effort to organize a number of them,
retrievable by issn.
 
                                Brian Nielsen
                                Instructional Technology Group
                                Academic Computing & Network Services
                                Northwestern University
                                phone: 708 491-2170      fax: 708 491-3824
                                internet:b-nielsen@nwu.edu
 
>
>
>
>
>
 -------------------------TEXT-OF-FORWARDED-MAIL--------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 02 Feb 93 20:10 PST
> To:      vpiej-l@VTM1.BITNET
> From:    Joo Yun Kim                          
> Subject: scholarly e-journals
>
> I am a library & info. science student at UCLA.  I am researching for a paper
> on electronic publishing and its impact on scholarly communication.
>
> I would like to know exactly how many "official e-journals" (ie: copyrighted,
> w/ISSN number, referreed or edited, etc.) are being produced today.  It would
> also be helpful if I could find out how many new journals were created during
> the past three to five years.  (Basically, any statistics on the topic of
> e-publishing would be helpful.)  Any suggestions on the sources for this
> type of information?
>
> Also, I was told that the American Chemical Society decided to experiment
> with e-publishing a few years ago by encouraging their members to
> publish their findings through the networks... I can't seem to find any
> reports on the results of this ACS experiment.
>
> I would appreciate any suggestions!  Thank you.
>
> Joo Cho (Izzypy7@mvs.oac.ucla.edu)
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 8 Feb 1993 10:14:25 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Deborah L Bendig 
Subject:      Re:  Defining E-serials
 
Michael writes:
 
> Also, WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and Telent databases are
> not considered e-serials, although it should be noted that
> e-serials are being archived on these Internet-based
> information servers with increasing frequency.  This is a
> tricky distinction as some databases, such as an agricultural
> news database, may be updated daily with new information.  How
> long this distinction will remain useful is unknown.  It is
> certain that any e-serial that chooses to limit itself to
> access only through an Internet database server will not be
> universally accessible from the rest of the Net.  But by the
> same token, the commercialization of the Net ensures that we
> will see a proliferation of WAIS, WorldWideWeb, Gopher and
> Telnet databases that contain serials which are accessible only
> by those with accounts and a significant disposable income.
 
What is it exactly about the database-model form of publishing
that excludes their contents from being considered e-serials?  Is
it a question of whether the contents databases are "published"
or not?  I would suggest that the act of making the articles
available is enough to consider them to have achieved "published"
status, regardless of whether the articles are automatically
distributed or have to be sought out.
 
In fact, the non-database, presumably distributed-issue model
carries over from the print world a restriction unnecessary in
the electronic world:  that of requiring an adequate number of
articles to fill an issue before the information is published.
One of the advantages of electronic publishing is that we can
make information available as soon as it exists.  But of course,
that fits much better into the database model.
 
Regarding the reference to restricted access, if it's a question
of not allowing the world to have [free?] access to the serial,
what about the print model of association publications available
only to their membership?  Aren't those publications considered
serials even though there is significant restriction placed on
their distribution?  In fact, any non-free publication restricts
access to only those who are willing or able to pay for it.  But
I don't quite see why this question of access would affect
whether or not a publication is defined as a serial or e-serial.
 
As you might be able to tell by now, I'm involved in a database-
model electronic journal, The Online Journal of Current Clinical
Trials (ISSN: 1059-2725), so I have a vested interest in this
part of the selection criteria/definition of e-serials and
e-journals.
 
Deb Bendig
*****************************************************************
Deborah L. Bendig               *  Internet:  deb_bendig@oclc.org
Sr. Product Support Specialist  *  Phone:     1-800-848-5878
Electronic Publishing Section   *
Reference Services Division     *  Address:   6565 Frantz Rd.
OCLC                            *             Dublin, OH  43017
(a.k.a. dbendig@oclc.org)
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 8 Feb 1993 13:21:48 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Instant Math Preprints (IMP)
 
Does anyone have a current e-mail address for
Instant Math Preprints (IMP)
 
katherine_branch@yccatsmtp.ycc.yale.edu  is no longer valid.
 
Thanks.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 8 Feb 1993 16:49:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Charlie 
Subject:      Cataloging e-journals
 
I am working on a paper about the current and future
cataloging needs and procedures for e-journals.  Much
of my research ignores this whole issue with the
notable exception of articles by Gail McMillan from
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
It is not that those who work with e-journals are unaware
of or do not care about cataloging, but I think it is rather
that the term "catalog" makes less sense in an electronic
environment than "database" or "index".  A lot of material
I've read does suggest that the issues of cataloging and
archiving are issues that should be addressed. But I see little
being done to identify the cataloging challenges.  Does
anyone have thoughts on this or suggestions for finding
more articles on the subject?
 
Charlie Mullin
GSLIS - UCLA
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 8 Feb 1993 16:49:51 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      Re:  Defining E-serials
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon, 8 Feb 1993 10:14:25 EST from 
 
Deb,
 
You are right. Excluding database-model network publishing reflects the
print model too closely. I need to rethink this aspect. It is quite clear
that the database model will become one of the main models of publishing
on the Net. I think that I am stuggling with two problems: (1) how to define
e-serials in a meaningful way such that every database is not also a "serial"
- for example, a OPAC card catalog could, by your definition, be considered
a serial, it is updated regularly. (2) Too inclusive a definition will lead
to a "directory of just about everything".
 
Perhaps the distinction that will prove useful is that a serial generally,
if not always, has distinct segments, issue one is identifiable from
issue two, and so on. With a database, this sequential aspect is not usually
present.
 
As to the comment on accessiblity - that was just a comment, not part of the
selection criteria.
 
As to Stevan's comment: at this point I have simply tagged all e--journals
as either being peer reviewed/ refereed or not. The tagging will tell the
reader if the serial is refereed, so the reader is indeed made aware of
the potential "quality" of material. Anything else would be too time
consuming on my part.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 10 Feb 1993 08:35:31 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         X91007@phillip.edu.au
Subject:      Psyche: A new electronic journal
 
                                  PSYCHE
 
         an interdisciplinary journal of research on consciousness
 
 
     Psyche is a refereed electronic journal dedicated to supporting the
interdisplinary exploration of the nature of consciousness and its relation to
the brain.  Psyche publishes material relevant to that exploration from the
perspectives afforded by the disciplines of Cognitive Science, Philosophy,
Psychology, Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence and Anthropology.
Interdisciplinary discussions are particularly encouraged.
 
     Psyche publishes a large variety of articles and reports for a diverse
academic audience four times per year. As an electronic journal, the usual
space limitations of print journals do not apply; however, the editors request
that potential authors do not attempt to abuse the medium. Psyche also
publishes a hardcopy version simultaneously with the electronic version. Long
articles published in the electronic version may be abbreviated, synopsized or
eliminated from the hardcopy version.
 
     The journal publishes from time to time all of the following varieties of
articles. Many of these (as indicated below) are peer reviewed; all of them
are reviewed by editorial staff.
 
 
        Research Articles___report original research by the author(s).
        Articles may be either purely theoretical or experimental or some
        combination of the two.  Articles of special interest occasionally
        will be followed by a selection of peer commentaries. Peer reviewed.
 
        Survey Articles___report the state of the art in some area(s) of
        research.  These may be done in the form of a literature review or
        annotated bibliography.  More ambitious surveys will be peer reviewed.
 
        Discussion Notes___critique previous research. Peer reviewed.
 
        Tutorials___introduce a subject area relevant to the study of
        consciousness to non-specialists.
 
        Letters___provide an informal forum for expressing opinions on
        editorial policy or upon material previously published in Psyche.
        Screened by the editorial staff.
 
        Abstracts___summarize the contents of recently published journal
        articles, books, and conference proceedings.
 
        Book Reviews___give an indication of the contents of recent books
        and evaluate their merits as contributions to research and/or as
        textbooks.
 
        Announcements___of forthcoming conferences, paper submission
        deadlines, etc.
 
        Advertisements___of immediate interest to our audience will be
        published: grants available; positions available; journal contents;
        proposals for joint research; etc.
 
 
 
                                Notes for authors
 
     Unsolicited submissions of original works within any of the above
categories are welcome. Prospective authors should send articles directly to
the executive editor. Submissions should be in a single copy of plain (ASCII)
text if submitted electronically or four (4) copies if submitted by mail.
Submitted matter should be preceded by: the author's name; address;
affiliation; telephone number; electronic mail address.  Any submission to be
peer reviewed should be preceded by a 100-200 word abstract as well.  Note
that peer review will be blind, meaning that the prefatory material will not
be made available to the referees. In the event that an article needs to be
shortened for publication in the print version of Psyche the author will be
responsible for making any alterations requested by the editors.
 
     Any figures required should be designed so as to be in screen-readable
ASCII. If that cannot be arranged, figures should be submitted as separate
postscript files so that they can be printed out by readers locally.
 
     Authors of accepted articles assign to Psyche the right to publish the
text both electronically and as printed matter and to make it available
permanently in an electronic archive. Authors will, however, retain copyright
to their articles and may republish them in any forum they want so long as
they clearly acknowledge Psyche as the orginal source of publication.
 
 
                                Subscriptions
 
     Subscriptions to the electronic version of Psyche may be initiated by
sending the "SUBSCRIBE PSYCHE-L Your Name" one-line command (without quotes)
in the body of an electronic mail message to LISTSERV@NKI.BITNET (or
LISTSERV%NKI.BITNET@cunyvm.cuny.edu). For general information on LISTSERV send
the command "INFO PR" or "INFO ?" Subscriptions to the print version may be
initiated by contacting the executive editor; a nominal fee will be required to
cover printing and mailing costs.
 
                                Archival
 
     Electronic back issues of Psyche will be availabe by anonymous ftp at
(location to be determined).  Back issues of the print version are available
for a nominal fee from the executive editor.
 
                                Assistance
 
     Anyone who wishes to participate in the production of this
journal whether volunteering subject matter expertise or helping with layout
or proofreading please contact the executive editor.
 
                                Book Reviews
 
     Please send books to be considered for review to Kevin B. Korb, Dept. of
Computer Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia. Fax:
(03) 565-5146.
 
 
 
 
       Executive Editor:
 
       Patrick Wilken
       Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
       Bundoora, Victoria 3083
       AUSTRALIA
       x91007@phillip.edu.au
       (03) 388-2347
 
       Associate Editors:
 
       George Buckner
       GRB%NCCIBM1.BITNET@ncsuvm.cc.ncsu.edu
 
       Adam Burns
       adamb@peg.pegasus.oz.au
 
       David Casacuberta
       Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona
       Barcelona
       SPAIN
       ILFF3@ccab1.uab.es
 
       Kevin B. Korb
       Dept. of Computer Science
       Monash University
       Clayton, Victoria 3168
       AUSTRALIA
       korb@bruce.cs.monash.edu.au
       (03) 565-5198
 
       Evelyn Mitchell
       Dept. of Philosophy
       University of Saskatchewan
       CANADA
       mitchelle@sask.usask.ca
 
       Juan A. Siguenza
       Instituto de Ingenieria del Conocimiento
       Universidad Autonoma de Madrid
       Madrid
       SPAIN
       siguenza@emdcci11.bitnet
 
       Stuart Watt
       Human Cognition Research Laboratory
       Open University
       Walton Hall
       Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA
       UNITED KINGDOM
       S.N.K.Watt@open.ac.uk
 
 
 
       Editorial Board:
 
       Ben Bradley 
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 11 Feb 1993 13:17:49 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Third Edition Dir. of E-serials TOC (pre-release)
 
FYI/RFC - this will be released on the Net later next week - still editing
and tracking down some more hopefull leads. - Michael
 
 
 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
 
 Reflections on Developments in Network-Based Electronic
      Serials: March 1992 -- March 1993. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
 
 How To Retrieve This Directory From Networked Sources . . . . . 12
       Via Listserv. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       Via FTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       Accessing the Gopher/Telnet Server Version. . . . . . . . 13
 
 How To Subscribe to E-serials and Retrieve Back Issues. . . . . 13
       Subscribing to E-serials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       Retrieving Back Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
             Using FTP Mail Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       Find Out More About LISTSERV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       Retrieving E-Serials via FTP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       Using FTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       Connecting to a Node. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       Various Common FTP Commands and Their Use . . . . . . . . 17
       Find Out More About FTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
 
 How To Submit an Entry to This Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . 18
 
 Networked Resources for Electronic Publication. . . . . . . . . 19
       Online Discussion Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
             Association of Electronic Discussion Groups and
                  Electronic Journals (ARACHNET) . . . . . . . . 19
             Association of Electronic Scholarly Journals
                  (AESJ-L) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
             Scholarly Electronic Journals and Electronic
                  Publishing Issues List . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       Electronic Serials for Publishers and Editors . . . . . . 20
             CCNEWS - Campus Computing Newsletter. . . . . . . . 20
             EJOURNAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       How to Start an E-Newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       Electronic Publishing on Networks: A Selective
            Bibliography of Recent Works . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       Getting an ISSN for an Electronic Journal . . . . . . . . 25
       PACS Review Special Issue on Networked Based E-Serials. . 26
 
 Section 2:  Electronic Journals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
 
 1. Arachnet Electronic Journal of Virtual Culture . . . . . . . 28
 
 2. Architronic: The Electronic Journal of Architecture. . . . . 29
 
 3. AXE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
 
 4. Bryn Mawr Classical Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
 
 5. Catalyst: The Community Services Catalyst. . . . . . . . . . 31
 
 6. Distance Education Online Symposium (DEOSNEWS) . . . . . . . 32
 
 7. Education Policy Analysis Archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
 
 8. EJOURNAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
 
 11. Flora Online. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
 
 12. Interpersonal Computing and Technology Journal: An
      Electronic Journal for the 21st Century. . . . . . . . . . 35
 
 13. IOUDAIOS Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
 
 14. Issues In Science and Technology Librarianship. . . . . . . 37
 
 15. Journal of Computing in Higher Education. . . . . . . . . . 37
 
 16. Journal of the International Academy of Hospitality
      Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
 
 17. Journal of Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
 
 18. LIBRES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
 
 19. MC Journal - Journal of Academic Media Librarianship. . . . 40
 
 20. MeckJournal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
 
 21. Modal Analysis: The International Journal of Analytical and
      Experimental Modal Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
 
 22. Music Theory Online (MTO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
 
 23. New Horizons in Adult Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
 
 24. Online Chronicle of Distance Education and Communication. . 43
 
 25. Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials . . . . . . . . . 44
 
 26. Postmodern Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
 
 27. Postmodern Jewish Philosophy BITNETWORK . . . . . . . . . . 46
 
 28. PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on
      Consciousness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
 
 29. Psychology Graduate Student Journal: The PSYCGRAD Journal
      (PSYGRD-J) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
 
 30. PSYCOLOQUY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
 
 31. Public-Access Computer Systems Review . . . . . . . . . . . 49
 
 32. RD: Graduate Research in the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
 
 33. Religious Studies Publications Journal - CONTENTS . . . . . 51
 
 34. SOLSTICE: An Electronic Journal of Geography and
      Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
 
 35. Surfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
 
 36. Textual Studies in Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
 
 Section 3:  Electronic Newsletters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
 
 37. Acquisitions Librarians Electronic Network (ACQNET) . . . . 56
 
 38. A & G Information Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
 
 39. AIDS Book Review Journal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
 
 40. ALCTS Network News (AN2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
 
 41. Amazons International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
 
 42. American Psychological Association's Research Funding
      Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
 
 43. Andrew View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
 
 44. Armadillo Culture: The Journal of Modern Dasypodidae. . . . 60
 
 45. Arm The Spirit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
 
 46. ART COM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
 
 47. Automatome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
 
 48. Bean Bag. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
 
 49. BEN (Botanical Electronic News) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
 
 50. Between the Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
 
 51. Biomedical Library Acquisitions Bulletin (BLAB) . . . . . . 64
 
 52. Braille Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
 
 53. Braille Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
 
 54. Buffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
 
 55. Cache Update. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
 
 56. CACTUS Newsletter (Capital Area Central Texas Unix
      Society) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
 
 57. Carolina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
 
 58. CCNEWS - Campus Computing Newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . 66
 
 59. CERFNet NEWS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
 
 60. Chaos Digest (ChaosD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
 
 61. ChE Electronic Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
 
 62. Chile News Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
 
 63. China News Digest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
 
 65. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Electronic Newsletter (CFS-NEWS) . 70
 
 66. Citations for Serial Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
 
 67. Class Four Relay Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
 
 68. Computer Science Center Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
 
 69. Computer Underground Digest (CuD or Cu-Digest). . . . . . . 73
 
 70. Computing and Network News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
 
 71. Computists' Communique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
 
 72. Consortium Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
 
 73. CORE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
 
 74. Cosmic Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
 
 75. CPSR/PDX Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
 
 76. CRTNet - Communication Research and Theory Network. . . . . 77
 
 77. ctt-Digest: The comp.text.tex Newsgroup Digest. . . . . . . 77
 
 78. Cult of the Dead Cow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
 
 79. Current Cites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
 
 80. Cyberspace Vanguard Magazine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
 
 81. Dargonzine - The Magazine of the Dargon Project . . . . . . 80
 
 82. DATA ENTRIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
 
 83. Dateline: Starfleet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
 
 84. DDN Management Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
 
 85. DECNEWS for Education and Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
 
 86. Deutschland Nachrichten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
 
 87. DevelopNet News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
 
 88. Digital Games Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
 
 89. Disaster Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
 
 90. Donosy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
 
 91. Drosophila Information Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
 
 92. EFFector Online - The Electronic Frontier Foundation, Inc . 85
 
 93. Electronic AIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
 
 94. Electronic Hebrew Users Newsletter (E-Hug). . . . . . . . . 86
 
 95. End Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
 
 96. Energy Ideas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
 
 97. Energy Research in Israel Newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . 88
 
 98. Erofile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
 
 99. Ethnomusicology Research Digest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
 
 100. EUVE: Electronic Newsletter of the EUVE Observatory. . . . 89
 
 101. FactSheet Five - Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
 
 102. FARNET Gazette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
 
 103. Fineart Forum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
 
 104. Fine Art, Science and Technology News (F.A.S.T. News). . . 91
 
 105. FOREFRONTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
 
 106. Fulbright Educational Advising Newsletter (FULBNEWS) . . . 92
 
 107. FutureCulture FAQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
 
 108. GLOSAS News (GLObal Systems Analysis and Simulating
      Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
 
 109. GNET - Global Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
 
 110. GNU's Bulletin:  Newsletter of the Free Software
      Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
 
 111. The Handicap Digest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
 
 112. HICNet Newsletter (MEDNEWS - The Health InfoCom
      Newsletter). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
 
 113. High Weirdness by Email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
 
 114. Holy Temple of Mass Consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
 
 115. Hot Off the Tree (HOTT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
 
 116. ICS Electrozine: Information, Control, Supply. . . . . . . 98
 
 117. IHOUSE-L International Voice Newsletter Prototype List . . 98
 
 118. IMPACT ONLINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
 
 119. Information Networking News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
 
 120. Instant Math Preprints (IMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
 
 121. Intertext - An Electronic Fiction Magazine . . . . . . . .101
 
 122. Internet Monthly Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
 
 123. IR-LIST Digest (IR-L Digest) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
 
 124. I.S.P.O.B. Bulletin YSSTI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
 
 125. Jonathan's Space Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
 
 126. KIDLINK Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
 
 127. Laboratory Primate Newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
 
 128. Law and Politics Book Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
 
 129. Leonardo Electronic News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
 
 130. Link Letter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
 
 131. List Review Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
 
 132. LymeNet Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
 
 133. MAB Northern Sciences Network Newsletter . . . . . . . . .107
 
 134. Material Science in Israel Newsletter. . . . . . . . . . .107
 
 135. Matrix News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
 
 136. MichNet News (previously Merit Network News) . . . . . . .108
 
 137. MICnews. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
 
 138. Navy News Service (NAVNEWS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
 
 139. NEARnet Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
 
 140. NEARnet this Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
 
 141. NetMonth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
 
 142. Network Audio Bits and Audio Software Review . . . . . . .111
 
 143. Network News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
 
 144. Newsbrief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
 
 145. Newsletter on Serials Pricing Issues . . . . . . . . . . .113
 
 146. Newsline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
 
 147. NIBNews - A Monthly Electronic Bulletin About Medical
      Informatics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
 
 148. NLSNews Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
 
 149. OFFLINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
 
 150. Old English Computer-Assisted Language Learning Newsletter
      (OE-CALL). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
 
 151. Organized Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
 
 152. PIGULKI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
 
 153. Political Analysis and Research Cooperation (PARC) News
      Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
 
 154. Practical Anarchy Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
 
 155. Principia Cybernetica Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
 
 156. Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
 
 157. Project Gutenberg Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
 
 158. Public-Access Computer Systems News. . . . . . . . . . . .120
 
 159. Purple Thunderbolt of Spode (PURPS). . . . . . . . . . . .121
 
 160. QUANTA - Science, Fact, and Fiction. . . . . . . . . . . .121
 
 161. REACH - Research and Educational Applications of Computers
      in the Humanities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
 
 162. ReNews (RELCOM NEWS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
 
 163. Rezo, bulletin irregulomadaire du RQSS . . . . . . . . . .123
 
 164. RFE/RL Research Institute Daily Report . . . . . . . . . .124
 
 165. RFE/RL Research Institute Research Bulletin. . . . . . . .124
 
 166. Risks-Forum Digest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
 
 167. RSI Network Newletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
 
 168. SCHOLAR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
 
 169. Scream Baby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
 
 170. SCUP BITNET NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
 
 171. SCUPMA-L: Society of College and University Planners,
      Mid-Atlantic Region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
 
 172. Sense of Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
 
 173. Simulation Digest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
 
 174. Simulations Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
 
 175. Socjety Journal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
 
 176. Somalia News Update. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
 
 177. SOUND News and Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
 
 178. Sound Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
 
 179. South Florida Environmental Reader . . . . . . . . . . . .132
 
 180. South Scanner Satellite Services Chart . . . . . . . . . .132
 
 181. SpaceViews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
 
 182. SunFlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
 
 183. SURFPUNK Technical Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
 
 184. TapRoot Reviews Electronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
 
 187. Temptation of Saint Anthony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
 
 190. Terminometro Electronico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
 
 191. TeXMaG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
 
 192. TeX Publication Distribution List. . . . . . . . . . . . .139
 
 193. TidBITS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
 
 194. TREK-REVIEW-L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
 
 195. Tunisian Scientific Society Newsletter . . . . . . . . . .140
 
 198. University of Missouri - Columbia Campus Computing
      Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
 
 199. Unplastic News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
 
 200. Week in Germany. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
 
 201. World View Magazine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
 
 Section Three:
Selected Network Guides and Useful Information Files . . . . . .143
 
       General Information Documents About the Net . . . . . . .143
       Selected Network User Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
       System-Specific Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
       Print Books About the Net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
       Print Magazines About the Net . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
       Hypertext Guides to the Net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 09:28:47 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Unconfirmed E-Serials
 
 
 
I have been unable to confirm the continued existence of the following
e-serials. If anyone has details on their present status or valid e-mail
contact addresses, please contact me directly at the address below.
Thanks.
 
 
 1. Postmodern Jewish Philosophy BITNETWORK
 
 2. RD: Graduate Research in the Arts
 
 3. Textual Studies in Canada
 
 4. ART COM
 
 5. Automatome
 
 6. Class Four Relay Magazine
 
 7. Computer Science Center Link
 
 8. Computing and Network News
 
 9. CPSR/PDX Newsletter
 
 10. DevelopNet News
 
 11. Erofile
 
 12. Fine Art, Science and Technology News (F.A.S.T. News)
 
  13. GLOSAS News (GLObal Systems Analysis and Simulating
      Association)
 
  14. GNU's Bulletin:  Newsletter of the Free Software Foundation
 
 15. Handicap Digest
 
 16. IHOUSE-L International Voice Newsletter Prototype List
 
 17. IMPACT ONLINE
 
 18. Leonardo Electronic News
 
 19. MICnews
 
 20. NetMonth
 
  21. Old English Computer-Assisted Language Learning Newsletter
      (OE-CALL)
 
 22. Sense of Place
 
 23. Simulations Online
 
 24. Socjety Journal
 
 25. South Florida Environmental Reader
 
 26. TeXMaG
 
 27. VapourWare
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 09:29:21 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re:  EJVC Masthead
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
I thought that this exchange with Diane Kovacs, proposing that
electronic journals should not have repetitive, automatic logo's or
front-matter might be of more general interest:
 
> Date:         Thu, 11 Feb 93 22:57:27 EDT
> From: Diane Kovacs 
>
> Can you provide an example of what kind of frontmatter you would recommend?
 
   Di, At the end of this message I reproduce the first screenful of
   the latest number of PSYCOLOQUY. But note that even the design of
   the subject line is critical:
 
   First, subscribers receive the following subject header announcing
   the issue:
 
Subject: psycoloquy.93.4.6.reading-inference.7.carreiras  (127 lines)
 
  Without even reading the message body, subscribers were thereby
  informed that this was PSYCOLOQUY, 1993, Volume 4, Number 6, topic:
  reading-inference, author: Carreiras, the 7th item on that topic, and
  127 lines.
 
  This long filename is also the name under which it is archived, so it
  can easily be searched and retrieved with the powerful new
  search/retrieval tools that are now available (gopher, veronica,
  wais, www, archie) using the essential information in the filename.
 
  If the subscriber decides to read on, the first screen then looks
  like the screen you will see below. Every line contains unique
  essential information (except the APA credit line -- and this will
  eventually be moved to the end too, but for now, while the medium is
  new and neophyte contributors are accruing daily, the information
  that the journal is sponsored by APA encourages new submissions as
  well as confidence in the contents).
 
  One does not have the sense, in reading the first screenful, that one
  is wasting one's time serially scrolling through tedious, decorative,
  repetitive information (of the kind one can effortlessly skip in
  scanning paper). Every line is essential and informative, and it
  proceeds without ado to the title, author and article, as announced
  in the Subject header, with clear indications of how long it will be,
  how many paragraphs, etc.
 
  Even the AAAS/OCLC journal, the On-Line Journal of Clinical Trials,
  the electronic journal most committed to duplicating the "feel" of
  paper journals (and which, unlike PSYCOLOQUY -- which is free, thanks
  to APA's subsidy -- has to charge subscribers over $100 a year for
  this costly papyrisimilitude) has recognized that this no-nonsense,
  no-time-wasting approach to "front matter" is the way to go
  electronically.
 
  Jettison arbitrary paper-inspired conventions such as logo's: This is
  a SERIAL medium and an immediate, intrusive one. You have to give the
  reader the resources to profit from it, rather than the impetus to
  tune out.
 
psycoloquy.93.4.6.reading-inference.7.carreiras      Thurs, Feb 11 1993
ISSN 1055-0143                  (6 paragraphs, 7 references, 127 lines)
PSYCOLOQUY is sponsored by the American Psychological Association (APA)
                Copyright 1993 Manuel Carreiras
 
                MINIMALIST MISCONCEPTIONS OF MENTAL MODELS
        Commentary on Garnham and on Glenberg & Mathews on Reading-Inference
 
                Manuel Carreiras
                Departamento de Psicologia Cognitiva
                Universidad de La Laguna
                Tenerife 38200 Spain
                mac@iac.es
                mac@iac.dnet.nasa.gov
 
1.1. Glenberg and Mathew's (1992, henceforth G&M) target article
presents three major points of disagreement with McKoon & Ratcliff's
(1992, henceforth M&R) minimalist hypothesis. First of all, the
minimalist hypothesis is challenged because it is based on two faulty
assumptions about mental models. The first incorrect assumption is that
mental models are constructed automatically during reading. The second
misconception is that mental models are "full" or complete
representations of the situations described by texts, and that they
represent them in a "life-like" way. The third point of disagreement
with the minimalist hypothesis concerns its claim that salience
accounts for the spatial association/dissociation effect reported by
Glenberg, Meyer & Lindem (1987).
 
               ------ end of first screenful -------
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Cognitive Science Laboratory |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
221 Nassau Street            |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
Princeton NJ 08544-2093      |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
harnad@princeton.edu         |    harnad@rrmone.cnrs-mrs.fr
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 09:29:42 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741" 
Subject:      Re:  EJVC Masthead
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University Libraries
 
I find Stevan Harnad's suggestions about e-hournal front matter very good
and probably very useful.  It stimulates me to think the following:
        a.  we have taken for granted the serial nature of our screens (I am
not trying to pun here); that is, the sequential nature of our email:  we
msut go to screen 1, followed by screen 2, etc.  Is it worth trying to think
of an email or other distribution mechanism that allows varying entry points
into the document?  Such entry points could be contained in a subject line
and the software geared to pick up the user's signalling as to where to
go.  This would allow a user to go directly (e.g.) to the front matter; to
the article header; to the final colophon; to a subsection--without having
to go through the article serially.
 
We're a little bit away from that but I suspect it won't be beyuond software
capability in a couple of years.  I thank Stevan for making so obvious to
us the serial nature of our mail; at this time I think he's quite correct
to think of getting the essentials up front and disposing of useless material.
        b.  There is no b.
 
--pg
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 10:43:51 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Digest software
 
> Date: Fri, 12 Feb 1993 09:25 EST
> From: "Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741" 
>
>       a.  we have taken for granted the serial nature of our screens (I am
> not trying to pun here); that is, the sequential nature of our email:  we
> msut go to screen 1, followed by screen 2, etc.  Is it worth trying to think
> of an email or other distribution mechanism that allows varying entry points
> into the document?  Such entry points could be contained in a subject line
> and the software geared to pick up the user's signalling as to where to
> go.  This would allow a user to go directly (e.g.) to the front matter; to
> the article header; to the final colophon; to a subsection--without having
> to go through the article serially.
 
Software approaching this capability already exists -- not yet for
listserv, as far as I know, but for the Unix counterpart of listserv,
the digest-list. In fact, the Newsletter section of PSYCOLOQUY is sent
out in precisely the format required for "undigestifying" the contents
and jumping non-sequentially to entry-points of your choice, just as on
the wish-list above. To use the feature, all you need is the reciprocal
"undigestifying" software residing on your own system.
 
Since, unlike the Newsletter section, with its many varied items, the
refereed journal section of PSYCOLOQUY is published one article at a
time, the mailer headers themselves are a way to jump non-sequentially
throught them. But if ever there is a demand to have the same facility
for the articles' paragraphs (all numbered) -- although I can't yet
imagine why -- that can easily be implemented too.
 
But even this wish-list shows papyrocentric thinking, because the real
key to non-sequential entry is the powerful pattern-matching ("grep")
capabilities of Unix and comparable systems, plus powerful hypertext
links.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Cognitive Science Laboratory |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
221 Nassau Street            |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
Princeton NJ 08544-2093      |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
harnad@princeton.edu         |    harnad@rrmone.cnrs-mrs.fr
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 10:44:13 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         LYNCH@jade.bucknell.edu
Subject:      Re:  EJVC Masthead
 
>...Is it worth trying to think of an email or other distribution
>mechanism that allows varying entry points into the document?
 
This feature already exists to a certain extent.  Some e-journals are
distributed over the Usenet newsfeed.  Depending on which software you
use to read the newsfeed you can search through a message for a particular
string.  The CU-DIGEST (Computer Underground) takes advantage of this
feature in exactly the manner described by Peter.  There is a brief summary
of each article, or note, at the beginning of every issue allowing one to
search for that note number and read only what one is interested in.
 
 
     Michael Lynch                      Systems Librarian, Bertrand Library
     (717) 524-3565                     Bucknell University
     LYNCH@JADE.BUCKNELL.EDU            Lewisburg, PA.  17837
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 12 Feb 1993 13:56:40 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         malewitz@lpi.DNET.NASA.GOV
Subject:      RE:  EJVC Masthead
 
Does this allow you to move, say, back a screen or two?  Sometimes when
reading a long article, it would be nice to be able to go back to a previous
screen, or even jump ahead a screen or two.  It's something we do without
thinking with paper media, but it's awkward to do electronically.  Paragraphy
(paragraph) numbering is one way to do this, provided you noted the number
of the paragraph you want to refer to.  Usually, however, you want to refer
back to something in the text because you encounter something on a subsequent
page that needs clarification, or that refers to something mentioned earlier
in the article, and you want to refresh your memory on that point.  Of course,
once you've re-read the section of interest, you want to resume reading where
you left off -- jumping ahead a screen to two -- rather than move sequentially
through the intervening screens of text.  I think that if users found
electronic media as easy to read as paper media, there would be far more
enthusiastic support for electronic publications.  The ability to navigate
within a given article with ease would help that readability.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:10:16 EST
Reply-To:     mzltov@nwu.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     Warning -- original Sender: tag was hjacob@CASBAH.ACNS.NWU.EDU
From:         Herbert Jacob 
Subject:      Re:  EJVC Masthead
 
Steve Harnad suggests that we get rid of mastheads and other "useless" front
material on the opening screen of our e-journals.  I'm not so sure they are
useless or intrusive.  As to their utility, I routinely provide information
about accessing back numbers.  Granted users can get that once and store the
information somewhere, but I suspect most don't and having it handy when one
needs it is very useful.  As to their intrusiveness, a single screen takes
one key stroke to pass through.  That's perhaps less effort than opening a
printed journal and finding the first page of text (not advertisements).
Let's not do things differently just for the sake of difference; some of the
format of the print medium had utility and perhaps still has it.
Herbert Jacob, Northwestern University
Voice Mail 708 491-2648
e-mail mzltov@nwu.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:11:10 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joan Boorstein 
Subject:      RE:  EJVC Masthead
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Does this allow you to move, say, back a screen or two?  Sometimes when
>reading a long article, it would be nice to be able to go back to a previous
>screen, or even jump ahead a screen or two.  It's something we do without
>thinking with paper media, but it's awkward to do electronically.  Paragraphy
>(paragraph) numbering is one way to do this, provided you noted the number
>of the paragraph you want to refer to.  Usually, however, you want to refer
>back to something in the text because you encounter something on a subsequent
>page that needs clarification, or that refers to something mentioned earlier
>in the article, and you want to refresh your memory on that point.  Of course,
>once you've re-read the section of interest, you want to resume reading where
>you left off -- jumping ahead a screen to two -- rather than move sequentially
>through the intervening screens of text.  I think that if users found
>electronic media as easy to read as paper media, there would be far more
>enthusiastic support for electronic publications.  The ability to navigate
>within a given article with ease would help that readability.
 
There is certainly paging software available to do what the author refers to
here (sorry, but the mailer here strips off the name of the original poster).
However, it is not always available for use in mailer software.
 
I would recommend that a user extract the mail message to a file and use
his editor to browse the file, if his mailer software does not provide the
necessary facilities.
 
--- Joan Boorstein (boorstein%umbsky.dnet@ns.umb.edu)
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:12:42 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Gene V Glass 
Subject:      Citing e-stuff
 
    Last night a subscriber on a list I moderate asked how to cite
 e-communications in a paper he is preparing. He wanted proper
 Amer Psych Assoc form. Surely someone who reads here has an answer.
 There seem to be four distinct cases, at least.
   Case 1. My friend R. N. Stonehill who works for the federal government
           kindly send me some im[ortant data available nowhere else. I use
           half of it in my paper and need to cite my source. Is this
           just a Personal Communication?
 
   Case 2. J. P. Doakes writes a brilliant posting to an unmoderated
           LISTSERV on BITNET and includes no subject line. But of course,
           we do know date, List name, resident node (and peers) etc.
           What if this List has annual archives instead of monthly archives?
 
   Case 3. Suppose Doakes had shined her light on a USENET newsgroup instead
           of a LISTSERV; no archives, I presume.
 
   Case 4. T.  F. Green writes a piece entitled "Unpacking luggage; the
           etymology of portmanteau." It is published on a peer-reviewed
           e-journal called Philosophy of Language that operates as a LISTSERV
           under the name PHILLANG. Of course, we know the date etc of this
           article, and that PHILLANG is archived annually and that it tags
           everything it publishes with a volume and "issue" number, each
           paper appearing aperiodically as a separate issue.
 
     Well, the more you think about it, the possibilities start to multiply.
 Any help with just these cases would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
-------**********======================================**********-------
GENE V GLASS                                    ATGVG at ASUACAD.BITNET
College of Education                            ATGVG at ASUACVAX.BITNET
Arizona State University       Internet Address:ATGVG@ASUVM.INRE.ASU.EDU
Tempe, AZ 85287-2411
602-965-2692
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:14:25 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Preliminary Breakdown of E-journal Stats
 
The following is from the forthcoming third edition of the Directory of
Electronic Journals and Newsletters. These are preliminary figures, I will
repost a completed analysis in a day or two, with commentary.
 
- Michael Strangelove
 
Brief Overview:
 
Total E-Journals:
 
      (confirmed).............................................  36
      (unconfirmed - not included in the following analysis) .  02
 
Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  35
Peer Reviewed/Refereed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
 
* Formats:
 
ASCII (only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
TeX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .01
PostScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .04
WordPerfect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .02
Macintosh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .01
SGML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .01
SGML (partial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .02
Other (gif, gaphical interface). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .02
 
* Distribution:
 
Database Server (Gopher, WAIS, Telnet, WWW...) . not yet available
Dual electronic/hardcopy distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . .05
Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .03
Microfiche/film. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .02
 
Year Started:     1987  02
                  1988  00
                  1989  02
                  1990  07
                  1991  09
                  1992  04
                  1993  12  (as of February 15, 1993)
 
Note that the first two months of 1993 has seen a 33% increase in the
number of existing e-journals.
 
[These numbers are only as valid as my catagorization of e-newsletters and
e-journals, which is bound to be somewhat subjective and open to
rearrangement.]
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:17:23 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
Subject:      Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
This is a draft, RFC/FYI, from the Directory of Electronic Journals
and Newsletters. - Michael Strangelove
 
 
 *** Reflections on Developments in Network-Based Electronic
      Serials: March 1992 -- March 1993 ***
__________________________________________________________________
 
 
Perhaps the most significant development in network-based e-serials
over the past twelve months is the recent introduction of the
Internet-based Gopher database server as a method of "distributing"
e-serials. Gopher servers, and other servers such as WAIS,
WorldWideWeb and Telnet, allow Internet users to access e-serials
through user-friendly menus and read current and back issues while
online. Uses can not only read these server-mounted serials, but
"retrieve" them by e-mailing a copy to their own account for further
use. These servers are bound to considerably raise the profile and
visibility of network-based publishing. The largest collection of
server-based e-serials is the CICNet Gopher database accessed at
gopher.cic.net and maintained by Billy Barron. It should be noted
that if e-serials become dependant on server-based access and
distribution, this may have an effect on their adoption of standard
tagging (heavy use of SGML based tagging, for example, would render
an e-serial rather awkward to read while online).
 
The server-based method of distribution is in fact the only real
widespread development in e-serial distribution. The recent move by
Oxford University Press to distribute Postmodern Culture on diskette
and microfiche in the Fall of 1992 is a foreshadowing of the eventual
full legitimation of the medium. But as over sixty percent of all e-
journals are less than two years old, this promises to have limited
impact in the immediate future. I suspect that we will soon witness
a trend in the opposite direction - a large number of print journals
being simultaneously published on the Net and in hardcopy
(particularly humanities journals).
 
ASCII remains the format of choice for e-serials, and only three e-
journals are offering some form of SGML tagging. While there has been
a fair amount of talk on the Net about creating a standard for ASCII
tagging (SGML or otherwise), there is little indication that the
medium is soon to adopt any presentation standards. While there are
those who feel an all-electronic standard is needed, a large number
of e-serial subscribers print e-serials before or after reading. The
two main strategies behind the publishing of e-journals are typified
in the serials PSYCOLOQUY and SURFACES. PSYCOLOQUY is designed
primarily for all-electronic, on-screen reading, while SURFACES is
disseminated only as word processor files, with eventual printing as
a main consideration in its production. It is far too early in the
evolution of network-facilitated scholarship to hazard a guess at
which strategy will (or should) become dominant.
 
At the start of 1993, e-serials are still not archived by libraries
(with the exception of three or six libraries, worldwide). In the
Fall of 1992 I was contacted by someone from the National Library of
Canada who was investigating the matter of archiving network-based
electronic serials. We can expect a few years to pass before there
are any major developments in this regard at the national level.
 
One trend that is certain to become more widespread is seen in a few
e-serials that begin free dissemination with the intention of moving
to a fee structure at some point in the future (after a sufficient
readership is established, no doubt). At present, only six e-serials
are charging subscription fees.
 
While none of the following are new to the 1992-1993 period, they
continued to grow over this period and hold promise for the future
development of network-based publishing: Cyberpunk and alternative
literature continues to thrive on the Net (one wonders how long it
will be before the new "World Fiction" movement finds a natural home
in the Net). Politically and "culturally" subversive literature
continues to flow unrestricted through the Net across national
borders. News service e-serials grow in numbers and have an impact
on world media. An increasing number of e-serials are coming from the
"periphery" of the Net; Moscow, Brazil, Poland, Czech Republic,
Chile, and Yugoslavia.
 
Clearly, the medium of network-based publishing is growing in
strength, influence, visibility, diversity and intellectual content.
The near future continues to hold much promise, regardless of the
looming shadow of uncertainty cast upon the Net by the coming
commercialization of the Internet. I conclude with the following
numerical breakdown of various factors surrounding the present state
of e-journals, as documented herein.
 
Brief Overview of E-Journals
 
Total E-Journals:
 
      (confirmed). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
      (unconfirmed - not included in the following analysis) .  02
 
Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  35
Peer Reviewed/Refereed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
 
Formats:
 
ASCII (only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
TeX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  01
PostScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  04
WordPerfect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  02
Macintosh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  01
SGML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  01
SGML (partial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  02
Other (gif, graphical interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  02
 
Distribution:
 
Database Server (Gopher, WAIS, Telnet, WWW). . . . . . . . . .  12
Dual electronic/hardcopy distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . .  05
Diskette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  03
Microfiche/film. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  02
 
Year Started:     1987  02
                  1988  00
                  1989  02
                  1990  07
                  1991  09
                  1992  04
                  1993  12  (as of February 15, 1993)
 
Note that the first two months of 1993 has seen a 33% increase in the
number of existing e-journals.
 
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:18:41 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KINGH@SNYSYRV1.BITNET
Subject:      RE: E-Serials as News Services RFC
 
Strangelove's observations on the role of e-serial news services (1/29/93)
struck me as perceptive and predictive.  Information is rarely perceived as
neutral.  The messenger's very life may be threatened (China,tanks, students,
crackdown).  Privacy, confidentiality, affordable access, and responsible
exercise of our constitutional rights are priorities for many librarians.
The publisher of "Somalia News Update" should not only be congratulated, he and
others who provide us with similar news should be protected.
        One other problem we all face is the ease with which misinformation
and propaganda can be "broadcast" on the Internet.  Like viruses, misinformation
is hard to detect until the damage is done.  We need some method for evaluating
publications.  For example, who supports "Somalia News?"  Are information
sources trustworthy?  Is there any evidence that the e-news service is biased
in its reporting of world events?  Authoritative print journals clearly
identify and describe sponsorship, mission, subject matter of focus, and
generally reveal possible conflicts of interest and possible biases.  the
electronic environment must find a way to rate the validity, reliability, and
accuracy of electronically delivered information.
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:22:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Timothy J. Anderson" 
Subject:      Re: Unconfirmed E-Serials
 
 
Art Com e-journal is still alive and well, just taking a rest
for a few months between editors.
 
A publishable contact address is 
 
I don't know what Carl and Fred would feel about their personal
id's, but you could use them yourself. Both function as
executive editors of a kind, although I don't remember their
titles.
 
Carl Loeffler: 
Fred Truck: 
 
tim
Tim Anderson
Fine Arts Services Coordinator
University Libraries                            ta10@andrew.cmu.edu
Carnegie Mellon University                        fax: 412.268.6944
Pittsburgh, PA  15213                           voice: 412.268.2451
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:22:51 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
Subject:      RE: E-Serials as News Services RFC
 
I would submit that while the majority of print journals may provide
information about sponsorship, mission, etc. they are not mandatory.
We face the same problems of validity, reliability and accuracy in
print that we do with electronics -- it is just that with print we
have a longer history...
 
 
*************************************************************
Dennis Moser
Internet:               aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
                        aldus@churchst.ccs.itd.umich.edu
                        aldus@hh.lib.umich.edu
Compuserve:             70253,2646
In an uncertain electronic future, a multiplicity
of e-mail addresses guarantees delivery...well, maybe.
*************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:23:15 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
 
> Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:12:42 EST
> From: Gene V Glass 
>
>     Last night a subscriber on a list I moderate asked how to cite
>  e-communications in a paper he is preparing. He wanted proper
>  Amer Psych Assoc form. Surely someone who reads here has an answer.
 
I am re-posting this in Response to the FAQ (frequently asked
question) just raised:
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date:         Thu, 15 Oct 1992 15:57:49 EDT
> From: Chris Stuart 
>
> Has a standard been established for citing e-mail in a scholarly work?
>
> Chris Stuart 
> Cornell Information Technologies
> 509 Olin Library, Cornell University
> Ithaca, NY  14850
> (607) 255-9099
 
I don't know whether there is a uniform standard yet, but this is the
format PSYCOLOQUY has provisionally adopted:
 
First, an article's file name encodes encodes the following
information:
 
   JOURNALNAME.year.volume-number.item-number.TOPIC.thread-number.AUTHOR:
 
For example, an item with file name:
 
   psycoloquy.92.3.46.space.7.velichkovsky
 
would be formally cited in an article as follows:
 
   Velichkovsky, B. M. (1992) The Spatial Representation System: A Single
   System of Perceptual-Verbal Access? PSYCOLOQUY 3(46) space.7.
 
What is unique to the electronic medium is:
 
(1) Item-numbers replace issue numbers, because each item is an issue in
itself. It makes no sense to bundle together multiple unrelated articles
in one "issue" in the electronic medium.
 
(1) There is a unique TOPIC name in the filename, making the scanning
and retrieval of the filename list (see below) more useful and
informative than numbers only would have done. This modification is
dictated by the unique electronic searching capacities of the new
medium.
 
(2) The "thread number" allows readers to electronically search and
retrieve successive items in the thread of discussions on a given
unique TOPIC. Thread numbers may point to earlier stages of discussion
on the same TOPIC in prior years.
 
(3) The AUTHOR name also allows retrieval by author.
 
(4) Paragraph numbers replace page numbers, but it has not yet been decided
whether it would be useful to include a paragraph span with the citation.
 
It should be clear that the volume number is redundant and
uniformative, and is retained only for the purposes of continuity with
prior citation and index practices (it will disappear eventually, just
as bundling multiple unrepated items in a single "issue" has already
been abandoned).
 
Below is a sample fragment of the PSYCOLOQUY index file. First,
connecting by anonymous ftp would list the following files
(I show only a sample of 10):
 
psyc.92.3.57.data-archive.4.jennings
psyc.92.3.56.data-archive.3.gelobter
psyc.92.3.55.data-archive.2.graham
psyc.92.3.54.consciousness.29.enright
psyc.92.3.53.consciousness.28.bridgeman
psyc.92.3.52.space.10.montello
psyc.92.3.51.space.9.bryant
psyc.92.3.50.consciousness.27.bridgeman
psyc.92.3.49.space.8.bryant
psyc.92.3.48.consciousness.26.rickert
psyc.92.3.47.consciousness.25.mcgovern
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Now here is the corresponding portion of the 1992 index file
(called psyc.92.index). This file is continuously updated as new items
ar published thoughout a given year:
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
INDEX FOR PSYCOLOQUY Volume 3  1992
 
Note that the filename for retrieving each item appears at the end of the
2nd line of each entry.
 
Filenames are of the form:
 
psyc.92.3.x.topicname.y.authorname
 
This refers to the x'th item in 1992 Volume 3 for the y'th item on that
topic (whose discussion may have begun in a prior year and Volume).
----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
McGovern, Katharine, & Baars, Bernard J. Consciousness confounded
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, June 24, 1992. psyc.92.3.47.consciousness.25.mcgovern
 
Rickert, Neil W. Consciousness and simulation
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, June 24, 1992. psyc.92.3.48.consciousness.26.rickert
 
Bryant, David J. How many spatial systems? (Reply to Velichkovsky)
PSYCOLOQUY, Wednesday, September 9, 1992. psyc.2.3.49.space.8.bryant
 
Bridgeman, Bruce. Mental life as simulation. (Reply to Rickert)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.50.consciousness.27.bridgeman
 
Bryant, David J. Lexical contributions to spatial representation (Reply to
 Brugman)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.51.space.9.bryant
 
Montello, Daniel R. Characteristics of environmental spatial cognition.
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.52.space.10.montello
 
Bridgeman, Bruce. Planning to plan: Iterative brain function (Reply to
 McGovern/Baars)
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.53.consciousness.28.bridgeman
 
Enright, J.T. Has consciousness become a soluble problem?
PSYCOLOQUY, Thurs, September 10, 1992. psyc.92.3.54.consciousness.29.enright
 
Graham, Peter Protecting the integrity of electronically archived data.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.55.data-archive.2.graham
 
Gelobter, Michael. Public data-archiving: A fair return on publicly funded
 research.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.92.3.55.data-archive.3.gelobter
 
Jennings, Edward M. Endorsement of ftp internet archiving of data.
PSYCOLOQUY, Friday, September 11, 1992. psyc.92.3.56.data-archive.4.jennings
 
------------------------------
 
Below is the article itself, but with all but the first and last
paragraphs deleted:
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
psycoloquy.92.3.46.space.7.velichkovsky             Tuesday  June 23 1992
ISSN 1055-0143                   (7 paragraphs, 11 references, 129 lines)
                Copyright 1992 Boris M. Velichkovsky
 
                THE SPATIAL REPRESENTATION SYSTEM:
                A SINGLE SYSTEM OF PERCEPTUAL-VERBAL ACCESS?
                Commentary on Bryant on Space
 
                Boris M. Velichkovsky
                Department for Psychology and Engineering of Knowledge
                Moscow State University
                Moscow 103009, Russia
                BMV@chair.cogsci.msu.su
                UZIFF016@comparex.hrz.uni-bielefeld.de
 
KEYWORDS: dissociation, levels of cognitive organization, mental
          space, psychophysics, spatial cognition
 
1.1  Bryant's (1992) target article presents an impressive body of
evidence for the possibility of integrating perceptual and verbal
information about space into a common format, but because there may be
an element of confirmatory bias in his discussion I will try to support
another position in this commentary.
 
      [text deleted]
 
1.7  The picture emerging from these considerations is of several
systems situated along the vertical dimension of mental functioning
(Velichkovsky 1990). Bryant's target article does an excellent job of
presenting the evidence on the central portion of the functional
hierarchy, but it unfortunately fails to distinguish human spatial
cognition's important prerequisites and advanced forms. Some of these
systems allow only "perceptual" access, others only "verbal."
 
REFERENCES
 
Aaronson, E. & Rosenbloom, S. (1972) Space perception in early infancy.
Science 177: 1161-1163.
 
Bryant, D.J. (1992) A spatial representation system in human.
PSYCOLOQUY 3 (16) space.1
 
Fauconnier, G. (1984) Espaces mentaux. Paris: Minuit.
 
Gibson, J. J. (1979) An ecological approach to visual perception.
Boston: Houghton Mifflin
 
Jackendoff, R. & Landau, B. (1991) Spatial language and spatial
cognition. In D.J.Napoli & J.A.Kegl (Eds.) Bridges between psychology
and linguistics: A Swarthmore festschrift for Lila Gleitman. Hillsdale,
NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associatates.
 
Leslie, A. (1991, November 1-4) Dissociations in acquiring a "Theory of
mind." Paper presented to the Conference on the Mental Architecture.
Centre for Cognitive Studies, Rutgers University.
 
Lewin, K. (1917) Kriegslandschaft. Zeitschrift fuer angewandte
Psychologie 13: 440-447.
 
Shipley, T. & Rowlings, S.O. (1971) Sensory directions in homogenous
binocular visual space. Perception & Psychophysics 9: 335-337.
 
Tulving, E. (1992, June 11) Human memory: Structures and processes.
Paper presented to the psychophysiological seminar. Faculty of
Psychology, University of Bielefeld.
 
Velichkovsky, B.M. (1990) The vertical dimension of mental functioning.
Psychological Research 52: 282-289.
 
Velichkovsky, B.M., Blinnikova, J.V. & Lapin, E.A. (1986)
Predstavlenije realnogo i voobrazhaemogo prostranstva [Representation
of real and imaginary space]. Voprosy Psykhologii 31: 103-115.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Department of Psychology     |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
Princeton NJ 08544           |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
harnad@princeton.edu         |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:24:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         David Robison 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
 
When citing e-stuff in a paper, I follow standard rules of citation,
either as personal communication (plan ol' e-mail) or as a journal
article (e-journal article). I treat listserv'd messages like
journal articles (hopefully there is a subject line, or other
distinguishable title in the body).  In a standard bibliography
authors do not usually cite the library or bookstore where they
got their material.  On the otherhand, explanatory notes describing
access to e-resources can certainly be helpful.  But I view these
as extra, so they need not (indeed can not) fit into standard
citations.
 
I realize this is not a response to Gene Glass' 4 scenarios, but
describes the guidelines I use for this problem.
 
David F.W. Robison                 Internet: drobison@library.berkeley.edu
Editor, Current Cites                            Bitnet: drobison@ucblibra
Information Systems Instruction & Support             Voice: (510)642-7600
UC Berkeley Library                                     Fax: (510)643-7891
Berkeley, CA 94720
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:24:35 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Re:      Re:  EJVC Masthead
In-Reply-To:  <9302151815.AA26848@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM>
 
 
> From Herbert Jacob:
> ...  a single screen takes
>  one key stroke to pass through.
 
NO!!!
 
I'm on the end of a 2400 bps pipe, which is better than many people
have, and I resent every screenful that I have to download and
discard.  I particularly hate the dbworld masthead, which gives
me no useful information on the first screen -- I have to get
a second screen before even finding the name of the message author.
 
If I were only reading one or two e-journals, the mastheads
would be no big deal -- but I scan 100 or 200 messages per
day, and the greater part of that time is spent looking at
initial pages to determine that I can skip the rest of the
message.  Anything to speed this process would be appreciated.
Equally relevant, any editor who fills my screen with garbage
message after message is resented.
 
My own newsletter has a minimal header, of course -- about
three lines of text and then a table of contents.  The table
of contents is much less informative than I would like, but
readers prefer it to having no such information.
 
The copyright notice and contact information go in a box at
the end of each newsletter.  I keep them to just a few lines
also.
 
                                        -- Ken Laws
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:32 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
 
>Date:         Mon, 15 Feb 1993 13:17:23 EST
>Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
>              and Access" 
>From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca>
 
>[...]      Gopher servers, and other servers such as WAIS,
>WorldWideWeb and Telnet, allow Internet users to access e-serials
>through user-friendly menus and read current and back issues while
>online. [...] It should be noted
>that if e-serials become dependant on server-based access and
>distribution, this may have an effect on their adoption of standard
>tagging (heavy use of SGML based tagging, for example, would render
>an e-serial rather awkward to read while online).
 
Not so!  Heavy use of SGML tagging makes texts *easier*, not harder, to
read -- because it enables the text to be efficiently formatted with
fonts, leading, and the like.  Without it you are looking at an ugly
plain text transcript with only a little more functionality than a
printed page (and a lot more tiresome to read).
 
A good example of this in the client/server network world is World Wide
Web, which is mentioned, ironically, as a server/database service
that is, supposedly, poorly suited to structured text.  You've
probably been using the telnet viewer.  For a glimpse of the e-serial
future walk over to the computer science department and use a Sun with
the Mosaic WWW reader to browse the Web.  Beautiful formatting, gorgeous
colors, and active documents with trails, and links, all beaming down
over the wire from various countries, dazzlingly sumptuous and as fast as
you'd like.  How in the world do they do it?  One guess.
World Wide Web is an SGML project.
 
Without SGML you have one foot in the past.  Fortunately client/server
database-style publishing and SGML are going to get along just fine.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:52 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
 
For what it's worth:   One of the most complete (at this time) guides
for the citation of electronic communications is the National Library
of Medicine Recommended Formats for Bibliographic Citation, from the
US Department of Health and Human Services/Public Health Service/ National
Institutes of Health. 1991
 
Scenario One --
        Author, Author's affiliation, Title of Message, Connective Phrases
( *Message To:* connecting author to the recipient), Message Recipient,
Connective Phrase (*In:* connecting info about the message with details
of the host system), Title (name of BBS or mail system), Type of medium
(*electronic mail system*), Author(s), Place of Publication(city of origin,
followed by state or country as needed for clarification), Publisher (firm,
organization or individual responsible for the BBS or system -- *unknown*
if not available), date of Publication (Year, month, day, and time).
Optional information would include Numeration of Message, Pagination,
Availability (if publically broadcast) and Language.
 
Scenario Two -- Same information as above: Type of medium=*electronic
bulletin board*, additionally, Date of Citation is added thusly --
[cited 1990 Nov 1, 9:10 am], since BBS tend to be volatile and this lists
when the citation was SEEN. Additional notes are acceptable, such as hardwaree
requirements, telephone line availability, etc.
 
Scenario Three -- Pretty much the same thing as the first two.
 
Scenario Four --
        This is what the NLM would describe as a *Monograph and Parts
of Monographs*. Their description of proper citation form runs three
pages and includes more information than what Mr. Glass has even hinted
at in his hypothetical article. I won't try to enumerate it here...
 
 
        I hope this helps...atleast the NLM is an exhaustive guideline
for all the possibilities. By the way, here at Michigan, we have it
catalogued as follows --
 
R 119 .P32 1991
 
I'm sure you can locate a copy in your library.
 
 
*************************************************************
Dennis Moser
Internet:               aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu
                        aldus@churchst.ccs.itd.umich.edu
                        aldus@hh.lib.umich.edu
Compuserve:             70253,2646
In an uncertain electronic future, a multiplicity
of e-mail addresses guarantees delivery...well, maybe.
*************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 10:01:36 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:32 EST from 
 
On Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:32 EST Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS, 401-863-7312 said
>>[...]      Gopher servers, and other servers such as WAIS,
>>WorldWideWeb and Telnet, allow Internet users to access e-serials
>>through user-friendly menus and read current and back issues while
>>online. [...] It should be noted
>>that if e-serials become dependant on server-based access and
>>distribution, this may have an effect on their adoption of standard
>>tagging (heavy use of SGML based tagging, for example, would render
>>an e-serial rather awkward to read while online).
>
>Not so!  Heavy use of SGML tagging makes texts *easier*, not harder, to
>read -- because it enables the text to be efficiently formatted with
>fonts, leading, and the like.  Without it you are looking at an ugly
>plain text transcript with only a little more functionality than a
>printed page (and a lot more tiresome to read).
>
 
The vast majority of humanities scholars do not have Sun or other UNIX
boxes, and most humanities departments are far to poor to support this
kind of equipment. For quite some time to come, the majority of e-serial
readers will be accessing e-serials through less sophisticated terminals
and computers that will only handle low ascii presentation. And on top of that,
as much as fifty percent of e-serial readers print the ascii text before
or after reading. So SGML or other markup that is intended to enhance screen
presentation or manipulation of the serial will be irrelevant to the majority
of readers. This is why I suggest that intensive markup of an ASCII text
would not necessarily facilitate the majority use of the text. Also note
that it is doubtful that most users will take advantage of format tagging
intended to enhance the printed text. I wonder if advanced e-publishing systems
are being designed or proposed that overlook the limitations of the majority
of end users.  I also wonder if the next generation of "readers" will place
as much importance on the presentation of text as this generation currently
does. I think my point still stands but am open to discussion on this matter.
 
Thank you kindly for the comments,
 
Michael Strangelove
Department of Religious Studies
University of Ottawa
 
         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 11:07:29 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Howard Pasternack 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
 
I'll stick my neck out and claim that as long as ASCII text remains
the "standard" for the electronic journal, then refereed or not, the
electronic journal is going to remain the second class counterpart to
the print journal.
 
I'll leave aside the print characteristics which some might view as
being archaic, such as text in different type styles or sizes.
ASCII text is unsuitable for graphics, illustrations, charts, maps,
and most tabular compendiums. While footnotes and bilbiographies can
be handled, they are not handled well.  Non-Roman alphabets can not
be accomodated within the same file as the Roman alphabet languages;
most non-English language diacritics are a mess.  And for disciplines
which depend upon non-textual graphics -- Chemistry, Mathematics,
Music, Art, Archaeology -- ASCII is irrelevant.
 
Howard Pasternack
Brown University
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 11:08:01 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Maximize Ascii
 
I'd like to second the remarks of Michael Strangelove:
 
(1) Screen-readable, plain ascii should be the first priority for
primarily textual electronic journals now, because for the majority of
readers that is the only screen access they have. Any markup or
formatting for other media -- enhanced electronic ones or paper --
should be backgrounded so as not to interfere with plain ascii
readability.
 
(2) It is not yet clear how many of the paper-like special features the
readership will even want to retain, once they have gotten accustomed
to electronic reading and its many remarkable ancillary resources
(character string searches, links to other documents, etc.).
 
PSYCOLOQUY uses only uppercase and lowercase plus spacing for format,
and gets along just fine for text. Graphics and special characters are
still a problem, for which a hybrid draft -- ascii text plus postscript
printable graphics -- is the provisional compromise in cases where the
graphics or special characters cannot be approximated in ascii, but
this will be solved by wider use of enhanced capability terminals in the
future, and certainly should not side-track predominantly plain text
journals now.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Cognitive Science Laboratory |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
221 Nassau Street            |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
Princeton NJ 08544-2093      |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
harnad@princeton.edu         |    harnad@rrmone.cnrs-mrs.fr
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 12:55:48 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stu Weibel 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
One does not need fancy workstations to take advantage of SGML tagging
and the many benefits thereof.  Even a straight ascii terminal can be
formatted sensibly using the structure that SGML encodes.
 
What one *does* need is appropriate software to do the formatting,
whether it is Unix-based workstation technology or the homely likes of
an 8088 character-only machine (I can say that... I still use one at
home ;-).  There is not much of this software around... yet.
 
Like Howard Pasternak, I think it is very unlikely that presentation
formatting will be unimportant in the future, giving us as it does
clues to structure and emphasis that enhance our ability to acquire
information and discern document structure quickly.
 
But we need not ignore the constraints of the glass teletype to avail
ourselves of the benefits of SGML tagging.  We should be pursuing
tiered delivery methods that support the lower technology path even as
we prepare ourselves for the more structured future and the promise of
improved presentation and retrieval that tagging can provide.   I have
been asked to look into this question in my role as an associate editor
of the Electronic Journal of Virtual Culture (soon to appear on a crt
near you).
 
One model might be the following:
 
 *--------*     *---------------*
 |  plain |     |      SGML     |     SGML filter
 | source | --> |    marked up  | -----------------> plain text
 |  text  |     |  Text archive |
 * -------*     *---------------*
                        |
                        |   SGML Formatter and DTD
                        ----------------------------> formatted text
                              (device specific)
 
 
Plain text would be marked up by editors or even authors, using simple
templates that capture basic document structure (titles, authors,
affiliations, headings, references, call-outs to graphics, etc.)  A
simple subset of the American Association of Publishers SGML tag set
could be used as a starting point.
 
The text would be stored in its marked-up version.  At such time as a
user retrieves it, it would (by default) be stripped of its markup and
delivered as vanilla ASCII.  If the retrieval request contained a
standard flag that by convention indicated retention of SGML, then it
would be delivered to the user in SGML form.
 
The software for formatting would reside locally, supported much like
listserv software perhaps.  DTDs (document-type-definitions, the
grammar of the particular tag set) might be distributed at the time of
subscription rather than with each retrieval.
 
I welcome comments and criticism from interested parties
 
Stuart Weibel
Senior Research Scientist
OCLC Office of Research
stu@oclc.org
(614) 764-6081
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 12:56:23 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Gregory B. Newby" 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
 
There might be dissention on this point, but the bib formats I
know about (but not intimately -- APA, Chicago, ALA) all say
that you do not cite things that are not retrievable.
 
So, anything archived is OK.  Anything available from you or from
the author is OK.  Citing something that was posted but has
then hit the bit-bucked (unarchived Usenet posts, email which you
possess but which is otherwise unavailable) is NOT citable.
 
If you cite someone as a source of information, it would seem
to be ethically sound to ask them before including them in
a cite.  In the case of someone who provided data to the
author via email, the prudent course would be to:
        1.  ask if there's another source to cite
        2.  ask if s/he is willing to be listed as the source
                if not
        3.  include email or whatever contact information
                the person allows (e.g., don't include their
                email or phone number if they don't want it
                included).
 
Just my $0.02.  I recently wrote a review chapter for the Annual
Review of Information Science and Technology (forthcoming in the
fall), and had to wrestle with this.  Basically, a bibliography
is for someone to access the sources you used.  If it ain't
accessible, don't cite it.
 
This is confounded in today's  electronic world, where something
which is available today might be removed or moved tomorrow.  Hence
the work on universal documement identifiers and so forth.  I hope
these standards are in place soooooon.
  -- Greg
 
***** Greg Newby, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
***** Ass't Prof, Grad. Sch. of Library and Information Science
***** 417 David Kinley Hall, 1407 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL, 61801
***** Voice:  217-244-7365.  Fax:  217-244-3302
***** gbnewby@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu, gnewby@ncsa.uiuc.edu, gbnewby@uiuc.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 14:40:39 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stu Weibel 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
 
I am curious about the common (though not universal) view that one
should seek permission before citing an electronic posting.  We would
never think that was necessary for a print citation, or even an oral
presentation.  Is it because we think of this medium as more akin to
conversation than writing?  Perhaps if we saw our words from these
lists quoted more often we might be more careful about careless
remarks... hmmm... not sure that would be a good thing after all
.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 14:41:52 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Chuck Bacon 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
Quoting Michael Strangelove, with deletions:
>On Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:32 EST Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS, 401-863-7312
 said
>>>[...]      Gopher servers, and other servers such as WAIS,
>>>WorldWideWeb and Telnet, allow Internet users to access e-serials
>>>through user-friendly menus and read current and back issues while
>>>online.
[...]
>>Not so!  Heavy use of SGML tagging makes texts *easier*, not harder, to
>>read -- because it enables the text to be efficiently formatted with
>>fonts, leading, and the like.
[...]
>                   For quite some time to come, the majority of e-serial
>readers will be accessing e-serials through less sophisticated terminals
>and computers that will only handle low ascii presentation.
[...]
>Michael Strangelove
>Department of Religious Studies
>University of Ottawa
>
>         BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
>         Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
>         S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
>         Voice:  (613) 747-0642
>         FAX:    (613) 564-6641
 
Apropos, does anyone on this list know of any software which presents
SGML-tagged text in the manner described?  Any flavor of Unix or DOS?
 
         Chuck Bacon - crtb@helix.nih.gov
        ABHOR SECRECY   -   DEFEND PRIVACY
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 16 Feb 1993 16:29:11 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stu Weibel 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
  > Apropos, does anyone on this list know of any software which presents
  > SGML-tagged text in the manner described?  Any flavor of Unix or DOS?
 
The OCLC Office of Research has developed an on-the-fly SGML screen
formatter in conjunction with the SCEPTER X-windows interface to the
CORE project (electronic versions of American Chemical Society journals
and Chemical Abstracts Services data).
 
It is fast and works pretty well for a rather complex data set.  It is
an experimental prototype, *not* production code, *not* available for
release.  I recognize that Chuck Bacon - (crtb@helix.nih.gov) is
probably asking about real software, and I am sorry I have none to
offer, but I point it out to emphasize that this is not an intractable
problem.  Doing it right is not trivial, nor is it trivial to have the
relevant infrastructure in place (multiple OS support, journal-servers
that understand the options, etc.), and to support it.
 
But GNU (the Free Software Foundation) does it successfully for *much*
more complex software objects.  When this community decides to marshal
the will and resources to organize this kind of a project, it could
happen relatively easily.  Hmmm....Anybody want to write a new version
of the listserv?
 
stu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:03:31 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Robin Cover 
Subject:      SGML for document delivery, not human eyes
 
The recent comments of Allen Renear and Stuart Weibel on the use
of SGML for the production and delivery of networked electronic
publications are quite on target.  The rest of the conversation
-- some of which has been repeated on ARACHNET recently, and on
other electronic fora periodically -- reveals that some
fundamental misconceptions about SGML still abound.   This is
very sad, because both the ISO 8879 and the popular AAP/EPSIG
standard (now ANSI/NISO Z39.59-1988, an application of SGML) have
been available in some form since 1986 or longer.  Leaders in the
electronic publishing world -- whether the AAP/EPSIG standard has
any merit or not in their pre-conceptions -- owe it to themselves
and to the people they influence to become properly informed
about what SGML is and is not.  A couple points germane to this
conversation:
 
1. SGML not a "text format" but an information interchange standard
 
SGML is designed as a (meta-) language to facilitate document
(structured information) interchange and device-independent text
processing.  In the background to comments by Allen and Stuart,
SGML is doing precisely this job.  SGML is not a "text format"
like PostScript or TeX or "WordPerfect 5.1" -- it is relatively
useless apart from applications that use it intelligently.  Texts
conforming to badly-designed SGML document specifications are also
relatively worthless.  In any case, SGML structured text is not
*THE* end, but a means to several ends, including the telos that
has not yet come to mind.
 
2. SGML is not for "human reading" even if it's human readable
 
While SGML structured text is "human readable" in some
meaningful sense that cannot be claimed meaningfully for most
word-processing formats (e.g., WordPerfect), this dimension of
human readability does not mean that SGML advocates think we
ought to read "raw SGML text" on CRT screens whenever possible.
Horrors.  Much less does this imply that *the* preferable format
for delivering electronic journals to MIME-less mailers "is"
SGML.  No one who understands SGML has ever said that, I think.
In fact, it's quite easy to design and build SGML text files so
complex in the use of IDs and embedded objects that no mortal can
read them (in any meaningful sense) in raw SGML format.  SGML is
meaningful to humans but it's meant for computers.
 
The major argument for using SGML in this context is that it permits
a multiplicity of "intelligent" processing operations, including
delivery over networks.  Having the textual information
intelligently structured in a processing-neutral way *PERMITS*
other intelligent processing in a myriad of ways: printing to
"dumb" CRT displays, printing to 27" color WYSIWYG displays in
pretty-print, hypertext-smart views; printing to paper (dumb line
printer or fancy PostScript output); intelligent indexing (indexing
named document objects and object relationships as well as string
content); intelligent retrieval from a document database (search
for object relationships, object qualifiers, etc.); intelligent
export and delivery (in a format YOU want, because today is
Tuesday, and you need "plain ASCII" instead of PostScript, etc.).
 
Now, when I hear someone say, "Well, since I cannot personally
take advantage of all the benefits of SGML text on my system,
today. . .I will not promote a strategy that builds intelligence
into the data. . .let's just perpetuate and live by dumb
standards until SGML systems are as common as dust. . ." -- I
sense that this person is short-sighted.  If you build stupid
data, then you can write an endless number of special purpose
software hacks to help manage the text "files" which hold the
character streams in computationally convenient chunks (lines,
fields, records) -- but it's very hard to manage stupid objects.
An alternative to child education is babysitting ignorance.
 
If the information you have in electronic journals is indeed
ephemeral throw-away stuff, and if you don't think it has any
"information" value beyond the use it gets after a few (hundred)
people print it out in ASCII format and then throw it away --
then, by all means, ignore SGML.  The lowest common denominator
(ASCII) has served us tolerably well for throw-away data for a
long time.  But it's also forced us to 'throw away' information
-- just ask the people who run the Oxford Text Archive --
precisely because (unstructured) ASCII is so dumb.  The problem
with this approach is that someone after you will discover that
there IS value, potentially, in the electronic material you
thought was useful for a single purpose (the CRT display), and
you may also change your mind later -- like, when you see what
SGML-based delivery platforms can do with it.
 
What Stuart Weibel recommends in terms of a multi-tiered approach
is highly defensible.
 
Allen Renear co-authored one of the seminal articles on
descriptive markup (SGML), and it's still worth reading:
 
 Coombs, James; Renear, Allen; DeRose, Steven J. "Markup Systems
   and the Future of Scholarly Text Processing." CACM 30/11 (1987)
   933-947. ISSN: 0001-0782.  Cf. CACM 31/7 (July 1988) 810-811.
   Abstract: The authors argue that many word processing systems
   distract authors from their tasks of research and composition,...
 
Robin Cover
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Robin Cover              BITNET:   zrcc1001@smuvm1  ("one-zero-zero-one")
6634 Sarah Drive         Internet: robin@utafll.uta.edu  ("uta-ef-el-el")
Dallas, TX  75236  USA   Internet: zrcc1001@vm.cis.smu.edu
Tel: (1 214) 296-1783    Internet: robin@ling.uta.edu
FAX: (1 214) 709-2433    Internet: robin@txsil.sil.org
=========================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:03:55 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "A.J. Wright" 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              16 Feb 1993 08:24:08 EST from 
 
All manner of citation to electronic sources/resources are included in:
 
Patrias, Karen. _National Library of Medicine Recommended Formats for
   Bibliographic Citation._ National Library of Medicine, April 1991
 
There are also a couple of guides to e-citation floating around the nets...
 
A.J. Wright
Department of Anesthesiology Library
School of Medicine
University of Alabama at Birmingham
meds002@uabdpo.dpo.uab.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:04:10 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Re:  Citing e-stuff
In-Reply-To:  <9302161333.AA05534@a.cni.org>; from "aldus@aal.itd.umich.edu" at
              Feb 16, 93 8:25 am
 
The NLM citations handbook, which includes e-materials among many more
conventional materials, is a comprehensive citation standard that can be
purchased from NTIS.  I believe the price is $27 for the 8.5 x 11
paper/spiralbound volume.  It can also be purchased in fiche...  We
ordered a copy 3 weeks ago; it arrived within 4 working days.  NTIS
takes phone orders and credit cards.  This was a perfect no-muss,
no-fuss transaction.
 
Ann Okerson/ARL
ann@cni.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:04:25 EST
Reply-To:     Richard Everman 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Richard Everman 
Subject:      Draft RFC: Having your cake and eating it too.
 
 
SGML provides structure to documents so that information about the document
can be stored and retrieved in a meaningful manner.
 
Case 1:  People with dumb terminals can still access data.  The software
         that is currently used would be modified to strip the SGML codes
         before the data is outputtd to the dumb terminals.
 
Case 2:  People with smart terminals can access GUI friendly software.
 
People in Case 1 are better off than before; the SGML codes will improve
their retrevial capability.   People in Case 2 are a lot better off.  It is
a win-win.
 
The users of the Net are better served because they will be saved the
hassles of converting to SGML (or its descendent) in the future.
(Look at the problem we are having making the transition from the
current TV display resolution to the HDTV mode.)
 
Richard
reverman@uci.edu
 
************************************************************************
 
 
In message <9302161513.AA23102@ka.reg.uci.edu> "Publishing E-Journals :
Publishing, Archiving,              and Access" writes:
> On Tue, 16 Feb 1993 08:25:32 EST Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS, 401-863-7312
> said
> >>[...]      Gopher servers, and other servers such as WAIS,
> >>WorldWideWeb and Telnet, allow Internet users to access e-serials
> >>through user-friendly menus and read current and back issues while
> >>online. [...] It should be noted
> >>that if e-serials become dependant on server-based access and
> >>distribution, this may have an effect on their adoption of standard
> >>tagging (heavy use of SGML based tagging, for example, would render
> >>an e-serial rather awkward to read while online).
> >
> >Not so!  Heavy use of SGML tagging makes texts *easier*, not harder, to
> >read -- because it enables the text to be efficiently formatted with
> >fonts, leading, and the like.  Without it you are looking at an ugly
> >plain text transcript with only a little more functionality than a
> >printed page (and a lot more tiresome to read).
> >
>
> The vast majority of humanities scholars do not have Sun or other UNIX
> boxes, and most humanities departments are far to poor to support this
> kind of equipment. For quite some time to come, the majority of e-serial
> readers will be accessing e-serials through less sophisticated terminals
> and computers that will only handle low ascii presentation. And on top of
> that,
> as much as fifty percent of e-serial readers print the ascii text before
> or after reading. So SGML or other markup that is intended to enhance screen
> presentation or manipulation of the serial will be irrelevant to the majority
> of readers. This is why I suggest that intensive markup of an ASCII text
> would not necessarily facilitate the majority use of the text. Also note
> that it is doubtful that most users will take advantage of format tagging
> intended to enhance the printed text. I wonder if advanced e-publishing
> systems
> are being designed or proposed that overlook the limitations of the majority
> of end users.  I also wonder if the next generation of "readers" will place
> as much importance on the presentation of text as this generation currently
> does. I think my point still stands but am open to discussion on this matter.
>
> Thank you kindly for the comments,
>
> Michael Strangelove
> Department of Religious Studies
> University of Ottawa
>
>          BITNET: 441495@Uottawa
>          Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA
>          S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA
>          Voice:  (613) 747-0642
>          FAX:    (613) 564-6641
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:05:50 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
 
I won't give an inch.
 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
>The vast majority of humanities scholars do not have Sun or other UNIX
>boxes, and most humanities departments are far to poor to support this
>kind of equipment.  For quite some time to come, the majority of e-serial
>readers will be accessing e-serials through less sophisticated terminals
>and computers that will only handle low ascii presentation.
 
>From:         Stevan Harnad 
>(1) Screen-readable, plain ascii should be the first priority for
>primarily textual electronic journals now, because for the majority of
>readers that is the only screen access they have...
 
This is a well-known great divide.  You know what I'm going to say: look
at where we were 10 years ago, in 1983; look at the plummeting hardware
prices and soaring hardware functionality; look at the new generation of
operating systems and user interfaces; look at the cheap high-speed
modems, at ISDN, at ATM, etc. etc. etc.  Sure it was hyperbole when
Olsen said, at EDUCOM92, that hardware prices were approaching zero, but
the PC Week on my floor does list a Gateway 486DX/33/4M/200M for $1995.
What will it be next February?  Or two years from now?
I think we are still in a period of fairly rapid change.
 
And cost isn't the important piece here.  These are early days. There
are still plenty of anachronisms of practice and technique being carried
over from the print media and the traditional publishing world.
Let's try to leave those behind and develop appropriate practices for
the new medium.  Let's not have electronic paper.
 
Douglas Greenberg of the ACLS passionately made your point at Casting
the Net, a symposium the Electronic Peirce Consortium sponsored, with
support from NSF, on building network research communities.  And my very
good and wise friend Richard Ristow frequently argues, with equal
passion, to the same end.  I listen carefully.  But I'm not convinced.
Again, these are *very* early days.  If you are designing an e-journal I
would be very careful about optimizing the design for the current
low-end or middle range of users.  I don't think it will use the
technology to very good effect (because there are still too many
anachronisms in this transition phase) and I don't think it will age
very well into the late 90's.
 
(Although as a matter of fact SGML facilitates the support of multiple
platorms, whether high-end or low)
 
>... I wonder if advanced e-publishing systems are being designed or
>proposed that overlook the limitations of the majority of end users.
 
Yes they are.  And a good thing too.  Those limitations are misleading,
artificial, and temporary.  Don't build them into your designs.
 
From:         MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA>
>I also wonder if the next generation of "readers" will place
>as much importance on the presentation of text as this generation
>currently does.
 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
>(2) It is not yet clear how many of the paper-like special features the
>readership will even want to retain, once they have gotten accustomed
>to electronic reading and its many remarkable ancillary resources
>(character string searches, links to other documents, etc.).
 
Odd turn this, *me* defending the value of nicely formatted text for
ease of comprehension etc.  So I'll leave that to others and try to
correct the false impression I apparently gave about my concern with
formatting.  SGML makes possible not just efficient formatting, but, and
more importantly, all kinds of processing: outlining and other
specialized views, intelligent navigation, domain-specific processing,
intelligent retrieval, and hypertext links.  Harnad mentions string
serarches -- but intelligent retrieval needs structural information,
hence the SFQL, HyTime HQ, and the DSSSL query language efforts.  He
mentions "...links to other documents"?  How? The best actual example,
WWW, uses an SGML subset.  The most functional specification is HyTime,
an standard very closely allied with SGML.
 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
>Screen-readable, plain ascii should be the first priority for
>primarily textual electronic journals now...
>[graphics and special character handling] ... should not side-track
>predominantly plain text journals now.
 
Maybe I will give an inch.  If you are putting out an electronic journal
today, or this year, then yes: it will be very difficult to do more than
deliver formatted text files with <80 character lines that subset of
ASCII that survives EBCDIC two-way translation and non-standard
gateways.  It may not be practical to do much more than this.
 
But if you are speculating about what the near future should be like,
how we can in 1995-1998 take advantage of the distinctive features of
this technology, then you should be taking SGML seriously.  Because what
the scientists at CERN, and their well-equipped friends elsewhere, were
doing last year, humanists may be doing next year, or the year after.
It's true that the first efforts will be by organizations like OCLC,
IEEE, and the American Mathematical Society, who have the resources to
be on the bleeding edge.  But the rest of us will be able to follow
quite nicely in their wake I think.
 
And humanists shouldn't be too impatient.  They way I figure it the time
it takes to get out just one volume of an MLA CSE scholarly edition the
computer world has gone through an entire hardware generation.
 
Ah well.  I'll shut up now.  (Jeez, what a classic SGML rant that
was; I'm so predictable.)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:06:06 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
 
>From:         Stu Weibel 
>The text would be stored in its marked-up version.  At such time as a
>user retrieves it, it would (by default) be stripped of its markup and
>delivered as vanilla ASCII.  If the retrieval request contained a
>standard flag that by convention indicated retention of SGML, then it
>would be delivered to the user in SGML form.
>
Yes, but on your own principles
    >Even a straight ascii terminal can be
    >formatted sensibly using the structure that SGML encodes.
what you really want to do here is use the SGML tags to format
an email-able text version: eg. put hard returns at reasonable places
(not just every 80 chars), put blank lines between paragraphs,
maybe double blank lines between sections, maybe center the title, etc.
SGML will let you do this.  And it can be done by the server rather
than the client.  (Actually in this case the server would probably
stage formatted ascii text files, just for practical reasons)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:06:38 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         CHACHIS@PASCAL.ACM.ORG
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
You are right about the perils of the Sun fanatics.
 
Bottom-of-the-line equipment does not mean that one has to live in a
wasteland however.  Marc J. Rochkind author of ADVANCED C PROGRAMMING FOR
DISPLAYS, Prentice-Hall,1988, went on to commercialize his ideas in the
Boulder-based XVT software company.  XVT is a programming language that
is called from C and C++ programs.  This windowing language not only
translates to a variety of platforms but to lowly text terminals as well.
A good project for your Sun fanatatics: how does one translate such
thinking to electronic journals????
 
George Chachis
chachis@acm.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:07:14 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         J.POTHARST@ELSEVIER.NL
Subject:      E-journals: SGML or PostScript?
 
 
Having followed some of the discussions on electronic journals
and SGML representation I wonder why so much of the discussion
focuses on SGML instead of PostScript. An author (or publisher)
adds some value to a document by giving it a format or lay-out,
and it seems to me that this value is best preserved by using a
page description language like PostScript. SGML coded documents
can be seen as raw material, as a stage in document production,
leading to final documents.
Why not focus on distributing the final documents?
 
 
Jan Potharst
Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam
J.POTHARST@ELSEVIER.NL
All usual and unusual disclaimers apply
***************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:07:34 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KINGH@SNYSYRV1.BITNET
Subject:      RE: E-Serials as News Services RFC
 
I agree with Moser's observation that print publications face the same
challenge to prove themselves valid, reliable, and accurate.  However,
because of their "long history" there are many more opportunities to
assess print journals: ISI's impact assessment; repuatation of editor and
others on the editorial board; indexing by major i&a services; wide
readership which, to a degree, prevents false and misleading information to
remain unchallenged; peer review; journal reviews; and library usage
and evaluation studies.  E-serials and news services will remain suspect
until they can establish a reputation not only for speed but for quality.
Therefore, one step in supporting their develi
 
 
 
pment (development -- touch
the delete key while using NASA telnet and "you're done for") is to
establish evaluative mechanisms that will allow ranking and filtering.
Also, transitory publications will always remain on the periphery of
scholarly communication, so electronic journals must prove that they
can remain available unchanged in some type of archive.
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 18 Feb 1993 08:29:02 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KINGH@SNYSYRV1.BITNET
Subject:      Re: Reflections on Developments Draft RFC
 
Strangelove highlights a real problem with any text mark-up system that demands
expensive equipment to format or view the marke-up text, a high-level of
expertise to format or view such text, and adds substantially to formatting
or reading time (as precious as money these days).  How can we continue to
advance in developing electronic text management which will ultimately
enhance portability, accessibility, readability, storage, and retrieval while
meeting the needs of most potential users.  We users, as Strangelove
points out, use e-mail extensively, prefer ascii text, prefer convenience and
ease of use over appearance, and generally print what we want at the time
we read it.  We face a variety of constraints.  I hate compressed formats,
for example, though I realize their value.  I hate them because I'm not
sure how much memory they'll eat once I uncompress them.  And I know that
some of my collegues spent over 15 minutes printing material that took
seconds to ftp and seconds to uncompress.  And these folks probably will
avoid extensive use of such materials.  I wish as much effort went into
development of speed printers with "Xerox" features as is going
into gophers, compression, and sgml.
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 18 Feb 1993 08:29:17 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re:  SGML for document delivery, not human eyes
 
For the record, I am all for SGML and any other forms of taxonomic
mark-up -- as well as enhanced screen graphics and even print
formatting -- as long as it's all done in the background and does not
interfere with the dumb-screen-readable ascii in which the texts are
posted. The PSYCOLOQUY archive will have an SGML plus version if/when
there is a mechanism that can take advantage of it and justifies the
effort. Priority now is neither enhanced format nor taxonomy, but
publishing important, high quality articles that will render the medium
indispensable to scholars and scientists. In other words, content takes
precedence over form. Once a critical mass is aboard, we can start
getting fancy. For now, the frills amount to catering to the converted
(a minuscule minority), while there is still a vast host of unbelievers
out there, neither reading nor writing for the medium, be it ever so
rationally tagged for posterity.
 
For now, the possibility of doing a vanity search of the world's ftp
archives on their own surnames (with archie -c surname) or a partial
boolean full-text search (on raw, untagged texts) with Veronica is a
much bigger practical incentive to the unbeliever than rational
classification of the text. Let's look to tomorrow's needs, to be sure,
but let's also ensure and hasten tomorrow's coming. Life is short.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Stevan Harnad
Editor, Behavioral & Brain Sciences, PSYCOLOQUY
 
Cognitive Science Laboratory |    Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
Princeton University         |    URA CNRS 1166
221 Nassau Street            |    Universite d'Aix Marseille II
Princeton NJ 08544-2093      |    13388 Marseille cedex 13, France
harnad@princeton.edu         |    harnad@rrmone.cnrs-mrs.fr
609-921-7771                 |    33-91-611-420
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 18 Feb 1993 08:29:33 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joan Boorstein 
Subject:      RE: E-journals: SGML or PostScript?
 
>Having followed some of the discussions on electronic journals
>and SGML representation I wonder why so much of the discussion
>focuses on SGML instead of PostScript. An author (or publisher)
>adds some value to a document by giving it a format or lay-out,
>and it seems to me that this value is best preserved by using a
>page description language like PostScript. SGML coded documents
>can be seen as raw material, as a stage in document production,
>leading to final documents.
>Why not focus on distributing the final documents?
 
If all I ever wanted to do is to either print the document on a
Postscript printer or view it with a Postscript previewer, fine.
However, I may want to view it on my dumb terminal (that is all I
might have at my disposal), remove the SGML tags so I can send it
to a friend who has only a dumb printer or terminal, take advantage
of the structural properties of the document or incorporate some
of the bibliography into my personal database, etc.  In all these cases,
I need the document with the tags.  Let the user decide how he wants
to use the document and certainly don't rob him of all the possibilities
by only providing the Postscript form.  SGML tags provide much more
information than just formatting.
 
--- Joan Boorstein (boorstein%umbsky.dnet@ns.umb.edu)
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 18 Feb 1993 08:29:45 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Allen Renear, Brown Univ/CIS,
              401-863-7312" 
Subject:      Re: Draft RFC: Having your cake and eating it too.
 
 
>From:         Richard Everman 
>SGML provides structure to documents so that information about the document
>can be stored and retrieved in a meaningful manner...
>Case 1: People with dumb terminals can still access data.  The software
>        that is currently used would be modified to strip the SGML codes
>People in Case 1 are better off than before; the SGML codes will improve
>their retrevial capability.
 
Of course I agree with Everman.  But I want to reiterate a point I
just made.  It might be a small one; but I'm not sure.
 
It is frequently said that one can support low-end devices by
"stripping out SGML tags".  I don't like the connotation here.
It's not that SGML tags are simply removed, but rather that the
file is processed and the SGML tags are used to make sure that
appropriate things happen during the processing and that the
resulting output file is optimized for its purpose and target
device. This processing will typically do things like compose
80 character lines, add appropriate CR/LF codes, add blank lines
before certain editorially significant tags (

, , ) and so on. It might also, a little more imaginatively, center and uppercase section titles, add double blank lines, etc. Entity references will be resolved appropriately at this time as well. Think of all the times you've had to read an ASCII file with a lousy or or inconsistently executed design -- no blank lines between major elements, truncated lines, deranged horizontal alignment, corrupted characters, etc. Unpleasant to read and difficult to massage into a consistent useful form for printing or inclusion in a textbase of documents or research notes. SGML is, among other things, a way to get files that are consistently and appropriately formatted for their purpose and target output device. So I think the notion of "stripping" the SGML tags to get an ASCII text is very misleading, even though that may in *some* cases be more or less what happens. But compare the metaphysics of processing of processing Nota Bene, WordPerfect, or LaTeX files when they are: (eg) 1) read from disk into memory, 2) converted from interchange (eg RTF, RFT) to binary formats, 3) formatted, 4) rendered on the screen; 5) printed; etc. We never say the markup in the original input file is being "stripped" or "removed" during these operations; it is being used. ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1993 10:10:02 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Chuck Bacon Subject: SGML flamewar Once again, I ask my question: Does anybody know of the existence of software for any platform which can interpret SGML? I am most interested in a mail reader for Unix, but I'd like to experiment with any software which is available. The morning after the POTUS' State of the Union message, I feel that the request above is a little like asking a Republican, "Yes, but *which* spending can we cut?" The SGML software features which I've seen described in VPIEJ are invariably posed in the future tense. PostScript is a general programming language, optimized for printers. One may create for any document, a PostScript file consisting of a more or less unintelligible preamble followed by a plain ASCII file. Moreover, in principle an SGML interpreter could be hiding in there too! And of course PostScript isn't just for printers any more. Years ago, I wrote a PostScript header for plain ASCII files which would format and print them nicely, two pages per sheet (or one or three, if asked politely). It's not a grand work, but illustrates the fact that a PostScript file may consist of plain, readable text, albeit with a header. Like some others, I gladly suffer through various markup systems provided the text remains legible. But I still use a basic mail reader (/ucb/mail). Some MIME software is apparently surfacing in pilot projects, featuring sound, pictures and plain text, but I don't think it has SGML capability. Chuck Bacon - crtb@helix.nih.gov ABHOR SECRECY - DEFEND PRIVACY ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1993 15:55:53 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Ken Laws Subject: RE: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? In-Reply-To: <9302181346.AB06720@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM> I hate to be Neanderthal, but SGML and especially PostScript have disadvantages in my situation. I publish an ASCII newsletter. I and my customers have accepted the limitations of this technology, and we work within them for the most efficient transfer of useful information. Now suppose I were to use SGML or PostScript to provide graphics and other improvements to those who could support them. I see four disadvantages: 1) the extra tagging and user support would make serious demands on my time (or manpower resources), reducing the time I could devote to information content; 2) information would tend to be designed for the high-end environment, reducing cognitive transfer at the low end; 3) customers without the fancy graphics would feel slighted or disenfranchised (even if given a lower dues rate); and 4) there would be less of a sense of community and shared experience among my society members. These problems will vanish as hardware and software improve, and as we develop algorithms for "translating" high-end information to ASCII with just a little polishing by an editor. For now, I prefer to publish an ASCII-only newsletter. -- Ken Laws Dr. Kenneth I. Laws; (415) 493-7390; laws@ai.sri.com. Ask about my AI/IS/CS newsletter, the Computists' Communique. ------- ========================================================================= Date: Fri, 19 Feb 1993 08:56:55 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Robin Cover Subject: SGML software (exists) Chuck Bacon's query -- > Once again, I ask my question: > > Does anybody know of the existence of software for any platform > which can interpret SGML? -- if left unanswered, could lead to the mistaken conclusion that SGML is all pie in the sky. I have sent Chuck a bibliography that includes description of some reasonable SGML software, and the 2-part FAQ on SGML written by Erik Naggum and Michael Popham. The latter is fetchable from the Exeter server (anonymous FTP to sgml1.ex.ac.uk), and the former, I think, is available on this group's LISTSERVer. The short answer is that dozens of SGML-compliant (-aware) software packages are available, for virtually every computing platform. Not all such packages are affordable, not all are friendly, some only pretend to support SGML, and hardly any can be described as wonderful. A highly recommended SGML browser is Electronic Book Technologies' DynaText (UNIX, DOS/Windows, etc.). Readers should know that SGML is a 250 million dollar software industry already, projected to become worth over 530 million (550 million?) by 1995. This investment doesn't represent just CALS SGML chasing after large government contracts, but smart money being spent voluntarily by small and midsize companies that realize how valuable information is as a corporate asset when it lives inside intelligently structured text. SGML is also being used in some interesting settings within academia. What's ironic is that government and big business have been more willing to embrace SGML's conceptual model of "text" than academia -- when, in fact, the academy has more to gain than big business in making the shift. (I won't defend that, but one might muse on the notions of semantic density bound up in natural languages, and on the extent to which written forms of discourse are themselves more or less a part of the information structure.) It must be admitted that I can't recommend a snazzy full-featured SGML "word processor" that sells for the price of WordPerfect at educational discount. For obvious reasons . . . not least of which is that building an intelligent editing and browsing environment (one which knows about document object semantics and syntax rather than just about string data and fancy fonts) is more expensive than building a "word" processor. "Word" processors typically are myopically fixated on superficial text appearances, and have almost no linguistic understanding of what "text" is. In the second place, we're at the beginning of an era, and modulo the commercial bandwagon phenomenon, many companies whose development teams know better are reluctant to *lead* into an innovative era when returning dividends to stockholders is the bottom line. Credits must go to IBM for having funded significant R&D in support of GML and SGML technologies. The momentum of the past era will be hard to stop, given that public expectations about 'what computers should do for authors' are so abysmally low. I hate to mention this, given the resistance to SGML that can be heard on some electronic fora -- but people may as well brace themselves for the news. As good SGML authoring and browsing software does become affordable and commonplace, it will become evident that authors are required to think about text in some fundamentally different ways. In the interim, several popular SGML-ish solutions are likely emerge to which allow authors to work within the old paradigm -- attempting to ease the burden of making the paradigm shift, or if possible, to completely disguise the shift. To the extent that such software raises consciousness about language as an attribute of text, and about document objects as discrete entities having particular semantic properties, and about the benefits of writing within the confines of (SGML-smart) stylesheets, such software will be useful. Unfortunately, these interim SGML-ish software solutions may also confuse writers attempting to understand the transition. Trying to live in both worlds will probably mean that some wannabe SGML-compliant software will only incompletely separate content from appearance (and fail to help users understand the central concept); some such software will try too hard to deliver the writer from having to break old habits and learn new ones, and from having to bear the new (different, not to say additional, or more demanding) cognitive burdens that properly come with the territory. Namely - a world in which the software's conceptual model of "text" properly matches the user's conceptual models of text and text objects. A substantial body of literature explains all this, for those who have ears to hear. See the SGML bibliography on this group's LISTSERVer, for starters. More successful (and intellectually satisfying) solutions for academicians, I hope, will come with SGML software that encourages writers and researchers to consciously embrace the paradigm shift. Such researchers will be able to creatively exploit the power of the 'new paradigm' -- because they understand the dividends that are repaid when text is authored intelligently and treated computationally as an information-rich, multi-dimensional intellectual creation. Robin Cover ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Robin Cover BITNET: zrcc1001@smuvm1 ("one-zero-zero-one") 6634 Sarah Drive Internet: robin@utafll.uta.edu ("uta-ef-el-el") Dallas, TX 75236 USA Internet: zrcc1001@vm.cis.smu.edu Tel: (1 214) 296-1783 Internet: robin@ling.uta.edu FAX: (1 214) 709-2433 Internet: robin@txsil.sil.org ========================================================================= ========================================================================= Date: Fri, 19 Feb 1993 08:57:13 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: LES Subject: Re: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? Ken Laws stated: >>1) the extra tagging and user support would make serious demands on my time (or manpower resources), reducing the time I could devote to information content; One of these days everyone will understand that verbal and visual information work together...with one not more important as the other...toward the production of "information content." Toward that goal, please work hard to move up the evolutionary line from the "Neanderthal." Paul Lester ========================================================================= Date: Fri, 19 Feb 1993 16:53:42 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Ken Laws Subject: Re: Re: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? In-Reply-To: <9302191413.AA24198@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM> > From Paul Lester: > One of these days everyone will understand that > verbal and visual information work together...with one > not more important as the other...toward the production > of "information content. I'm not sure I understand. If you mean that layout is important -- paragraph spacing, line breaking, etc., then that was part of my original thesis. Given the current state of the art, I believe than I can best serve my newsletter readers by doing the layout myself. That may change -- TeX is already pretty good at layout -- but hand layout still has advantages for the average email newsletter reader. (And note that I do sometimes choose my words and phrases to adjust the length of a line or the pattern of line lengths across a paragraph -- clear evidence that I share your concern for visual aspects of presentation, and illustrating a level of customization that SGML cannot currently provide with fixed-width fonts.) If you mean that graphics are important for most-effective communication, then I refer you to all of the points I made in my first message. There are times when communication must be optimized in the absence of graphic capability, and there is currently no automated technology for doing that when the source material includes important graphics. For example, suppose that a journal article includes a graph of DSP chip speeds over the past decade. An SGML-based system, or a reading aid for the blind, might provide a general description of the graph and read off the numbers it contains. What I would do instead, knowing that I must shove my information down an ASCII pipe, is to comment on the trend that the graph is intended to illustrate and then list just two or three of the numbers -- perhaps the first and last. A good author might do so in any case, but it is more likely that an author or editor would depend on the graphic instead of providing redundant words to convey the same information. One final point. I notice that People magazine is printed with B&W celebrity/news photos and color ads. This is clearly an artistic decision rather than a technological one. There are times when publishers find it useful or profitable to back off from state-of-the-art technology. My own email newsletter seems to be an example. I have no problem with people who want to develop better technology, but the current technology is adequate for my needs and perhaps even close to optimal. -- Ken Laws ------- ========================================================================= Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1993 08:16:09 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Editors of PMC Subject: Re: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? In-Reply-To: Message of Wed, 17 Feb 1993 08:07:14 EST from Jan Potharst's remarks about sgml and postscript would make more sense if we all envisioned the printed page as the final form of our documents: for those of us actively involved in electronic publishing, this does not seem such an obvious thing, though. And if the printed page is *not* the final form--and if a networked database *is*--then sgml makes a lot more sense than postscript. John Unsworth ========================================================================= Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1993 09:09:22 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Guedon Jean-Claude Subject: Re: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? In-Reply-To: <199302221321.AA19017@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA>; from "Editors of PMC" at Feb 22, 93 8:16 am Following up on John Unsworth's remark, with which I find myself largeley in agreement, I believe we must think about this question in a processual manner: we will eventually move away, bit by bit (so to speak!) from paper. In the meanwhile, I believe we must think about delegation of printing upon the reader until the reader him(her)self changes (i.e. his or her status, social or epistemological, changes). Jean-Claude Guedon co-editor Surfaces ========================================================================= Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1993 11:05:07 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: J.POTHARST@ELSEVIER.NL Subject: Re: E-journals: SGML or PostScript? Even if electronic publishing is moving away from paper, the *lay-out* of a document (displayed onscreen) is in principle better preserved in a PDL than in SGML, and the PDL can be stored in a database *too*. Jan Potharst (expressing highly personal opinions only) ========================================================================= Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1993 11:10:57 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca> Subject: Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial Most have probably heard of the Ariel electronic publishing trial experiment on JANET by nine-very-big-publishers. Any thoughts on this? Is it an innovation in scholarly communication or a thinly disguised attempt by big business to circumvent any real innovation in scholarly publishing and ownership of intellectual/academic production? Will it establish a system that is well suited to expensive serial/document delivery but unlikely to support serials-without-funds? Is it a system designed to appear legitimate in a particular socio-cultural milieu that trails far behind North American experiments in all-electronic, network based scholarly communication and publishing (is this a fair assessment?) Is it merely an innovation in marketing -- will it relieve or aggravate the crisis in serials pricing? Are we headed towards a hierarchy of scholarly publishing that has network-based systems at the bottom, proprietary electronic publishing in the middle, and traditional print publication at top? Any thoughts? (please be kind - these are all questions, note claims). Michael Strangelove, Publisher The Internet/NREN Business Journal BITNET: 441495@Uottawa Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA Voice: (613) 747-0642 FAX: (613) 564-6641 ========================================================================= Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1993 13:12:49 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Brian Nielsen Subject: Re: Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial In-Reply-To: <01GV2328XR4G000Y7H@nuacc.acns.nwu.edu>; from "MICHAEL STRANGELOVE" at Feb 23, 93 11:10 am My initial thought to Michael's question is that the Ariel trial is a pick-up- the-pieces effort following on the Adonis project of a few years ago. That may be wrong, but it would make sense that all the invested organizational time in that project of a few years ago still wants some kind of r.o.i.. Make sense? Brian Nielsen Instructional Technology Group Academic Computing & Network Services Northwestern University phone: 708 491-2170 fax: 708 491-3824 internet:b-nielsen@nwu.edu Michael S. writes: > > Most have probably heard of the Ariel electronic publishing trial > experiment on JANET by nine-very-big-publishers. Any thoughts on this? > Is it an innovation in scholarly communication or a thinly disguised attempt > by big business to circumvent any real innovation in scholarly > publishing and ownership of intellectual/academic production? Will it > establish a system that is well suited to expensive serial/document > delivery but unlikely to support serials-without-funds? Is it a system > designed to appear legitimate in a particular socio-cultural milieu that > trails far behind North American experiments in all-electronic, network > based scholarly communication and publishing (is this a fair assessment?) > Is it merely an innovation in marketing -- will it relieve or aggravate the > crisis in serials pricing? Are we headed towards a hierarchy of scholarly > publishing that has network-based systems at the bottom, proprietary > electronic publishing in the middle, and traditional print publication at top? > > Any thoughts? (please be kind - these are all questions, note claims). > > > Michael Strangelove, Publisher > The Internet/NREN Business Journal > > BITNET: 441495@Uottawa > Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA > S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA > Voice: (613) 747-0642 > FAX: (613) 564-6641 > ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 25 Feb 1993 08:07:04 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: "Lorcan Dempsey, UKOLN, Bath" Subject: Re: Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial Perhaps Michael could supply some more details of the project before there is a rush to discuss it. I am aware of a SuperJANET project involving document delivery between libraries, maybe using Ariel. I am also aware of a SuperJANET project being developed by a consortium of publishers to develop an electronic journal testbed. Some publishers are also looking at other projects. I am not aware of a SuperJANET project involving a group of publishers and Ariel, but would be interested to hear about one if one does indeed exist. Lorcan +------------------------------------------------------------+ Lorcan Dempsey ph: +44 225 826254 fx: +44 225 826229 +------------------------------------------------------------+ UKOLN : The Office for Library and Information Networking +---------- University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK ------------+ ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 25 Feb 1993 08:08:07 EST Reply-To: mzltov@nwu.edu Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was hjacob@CASBAH.ACNS.NWU.EDU From: Herbert Jacob Subject: RE:Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca> writes: >Most have probably heard of the Ariel electronic publishing trial >experiment on JANET by nine-very-big-publishers. Any thoughts on this? For those of us who have not heard about it, would somebody provide a brief description? Herbert Jacob, Northwestern University Voice Mail 708 491-2648 e-mail mzltov@nwu.edu ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 25 Feb 1993 21:08:46 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: MICHAEL STRANGELOVE <441495@acadvm1.uottawa.ca> Subject: Re: RE:Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial In-Reply-To: Your message of Thu, 25 Feb 1993 08:08:07 EST My apologies to all for being unnecessarily cryptic. I will see if I can dig up the press release from somewhere in my paper jungle. Michael Strangelove, Publisher The Internet/NREN Business Journal BITNET: 441495@Uottawa Internet: 441495@Acadvm1.Uottawa.CA S-Mail: 177 Waller, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 CANADA Voice: (613) 747-0642 FAX: (613) 564-6641 ========================================================================= Date: Thu, 25 Feb 1993 21:10:53 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Electronic Publishing Section Subject: New List: OCLC-JOURNALS (This message has been cross-posted to NEW-LIST, MEDLIB-L, LIBREF-L, PACS-L, VPIEJ-L, and ARACHNET. Please excuse any duplication.) OCLC-JOURNALS on LISTSERV@OCLC.ORG - OCLC electronic journal publishing The OCLC-JOURNALS list is provided as a means of distributing information about OCLC electronic journal publishing, including information about The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials, published as a joint venture between the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and OCLC Online Computer Library Center. New articles published in OJCCT are announced on this list. The OCLC-JOURNALS list will eventually become a moderated discussion list covering topics associated with OCLC electronic publishing; subscriber postings to the list will be ignored until that time. Also associated with this list are informational files, including descriptive, pricing, and subscription information about journals published electronically through OCLC's electronic publishing services. To subscribe to the OCLC-JOURNALS list, send: SUBSCRIBE OCLC-JOURNALS Your Name as the body of a mail message to the list server address (LISTSERV@OCLC.ORG). For example, SUBSCRIBE OCLC-JOURNALS Jane Doe. List Owner: Deb Bendig (e-pub@oclc.org) ========================================================================= Date: Fri, 26 Feb 1993 15:19:01 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: Gail Mc Subject: Re: Defining E-serials In-Reply-To: Message of Mon, 8 Feb 1993 16:49:51 EST from <441495@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.CA> I am in the process of cataloging many CD-ROMs (another type of e-journal, I know) that contain standards for engineering. While I am cataloging them as serials, they are indeed databases of standards. My job is to provide access to them through our online catalog (and through the OCLC database). They will have Library of Congress call numbers so that they will be accessible with other publications in their call no. ranges. They will have subject tracings and corporate body added entries that will lead the online catalog searcher to these library materials as well as books, serials, videos, other computer files, etc. with similar subject and name tracings. In my librarian-oriented mind, these CD-ROMs and other types of online data- bases and e-journals fall well within the definition of traditional serials and can be served very well (though not perfectly) by traditional cataloging. Is my point of view so warped by my library and cataloging orientation that I cannot see the forest for the trees? Is there additional/different info I could reasonably provide on the bibliographic/holdings screens in the online catalog that would enhance access to the information for the library's users? The stereotype of the rule bound librarian does not fairly describe all of us catalogers. Most of us have more materials to catalog than there is time, so we must compromise. But through such discussions we learn what is needed to provide better access. Then find the rule to justify it and go on to the next item to catalog with a clear conscience. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ .........................Gail McMillan........................ ___....____________......Serials Team Leader.................. \ \../ ___ ___/.........University Libraries VPI&SU....... .\ \/ /../ /.............Blacksburg, VA - (703) 231-9252... ..\ /../ /..............FAX (703) 231-3694................ ...\ /../ /................................................. ....\/../__/..........INTERNET.....gmcmilla@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU.... ......................BITNET.......gmcmilla@VTVM1............. ========================================================================= Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1993 18:51:10 EST Reply-To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" Sender: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access" From: HM Woodward Subject: Re: Thoughts on the SuperJANET Ariel Publishing Trial In-Reply-To: <5382.9302251310@hpd.lut.ac.uk>; from "Lorcan Dempsey, UKOLN, Bath" at Feb 25, 93 8:07 am There is a brief report in the (electronic) "Newsletter on serials pricing issues" No. 70, Feb 12 1993, from Institute of Physics. Further details can be obtained from David Pullinger, IOP Publishing. Hazel Woodward

__________________________________________________________________

James Powell