VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

September 1993

=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 1 Sep 1993 10:12:01 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON REFEREED ELECTRONIC JOURNALS
 
Date: Tue, 31 Aug 1993 12:58:03 -0500 (CDT)
From: Helga Dyck 
 
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON REFEREED ELECTRONIC JOURNALS:
Towards a Consortium for Networked Publications
 
PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME October 1-2, 1993 (Friday & Saturday)
 
The Delta Winnipeg Hotel
288 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 0B8
 
Sponsored by:
Medical Research Council
Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council
Social Science & Humanities Research Council of Canada
The University of Manitoba
 
The University of Manitoba
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON REFEREED ELECTRONIC JOURNALS:
Towards a Consortium for Networked Publications
 
The Internet is a major new medium for dissemination of research, and
it is vital that the scholarly community become acquainted with the
enormous potential of the Internet for scholarship. Commercial
companies are already devoting attention to developing computer network
publication projects. It is imperative that the scholarly community not
leave this major medium to be developed solely by commercial
interests.
 
The aims of the conference are:
 
*to make academic merit the sole consideration in the publication of
journal-type research;
*to advance the idea that the academic community should have a hand in
determining what gets published and how it is disseminated;
*to provide an outlet of research publication that is not subject to the
severe economic constraints of traditional paper-journal publishing;
*to make collective use of the scholarly advantages of network
publication(savings in production costs, speed-up in publication and
dissemination process);
*to provide an effective and low-cost means for universities to play a
greater role as disseminators of research information, and not only as
producers and consumers.
 
This historic two-day event is organized as a series of plenary working
sessions that will include presentations from major resource people
from a variety of fields. It will include an exhibit and demonstration
of the latest in computer technology for long distance data transfer as
it applies to electronic journals, with an emphasis on text, image and
sound signal processing and compression. Registration is limited to 200
participants.
 
 
PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME
 
Thursday, September 30, 1993
 
18:00 Pre-Registration, 11th floor foyer, Delta Winnipeg Hotel
 
Friday, October 1, 1993
 
 9:00 Welcome
             ARNOLD NAIMARK, President, University of Manitoba
 9:15 Session 1: The Nature, Advantages and Disadvantages of Electronic
Journal Publication
             Opening and Chair: LARRY HURTADO, Religion, Univ Manitoba
             Portrait of the Electronic Journals World
             ANN OKERSON, Association of Research Libraries
             The Economics of Journal Publication
             Speaker T.B.A.
10:40 Break
 
11:00 Session 2: Practical Implementations: Editing and Production
 
Editing and Producing Surfaces: Flexible Designs for Shifting Objectives
    JEAN-CLAUDE GUEDON, Comparative Literature, University of Montreal
Investigations in Electronic Delivery of Chemical Information
    LORRIN R. GARSON, American Chemical Society
Editing an Electronic Journal: One Foot in the Past, One Hand in the Future
    EDWARD J. HUTH, American Association for the Advancement of Science
 
12:30 Lunch
 
13:30 Session 3: Practical Implementations: The Distribution of
Electronic Journals
 
Current Trends in the Distribution of Networked-Based Electronic Journals
    MICHAEL STRANGELOVE, Religious Studies, University of Ottawa
So we have this great electronic journal, now what?
    JOHN BLACK, Chief Librarian, University of Guelph
A Model for Producing, Delivering and Consuming Refereed Electronic Journals
    TIMOTHY D. STEPHEN and TERESA M. HARRISON, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
 
14:50  Break
 
15:10  Session 4: Issues of Quality
 
Implementing Peer Review on the Net:
Scientific Quality Control in Scholarly Electronic Journals
    STEVAN HARNAD, Laboratoire Cognition et Mouvement
CNRS, Univ.  Aix-Marseille
The Future Place of Electronic Media Publication in the Evaluation of
Faculty, Research and Scholarship
    JAMES GARDNER, Vice-President (Academic) & Provost, University of Manitoba
 
16:30 Question Period
 
18:00 Dinner
 
Saturday, October 2, 1993
 
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
 
Exhibit: A demonstration of the latest in computer technology for long
distance data transfer as it applies to electronic journals, with
particular emphasis on text, image and sound signal processing and
compression.
 
 9:00  Session 5: Legal Issues
 
Copyright Protection or Copyright Sharing: Two Alternative Legal Models
for Management of and Access to Electronic Journals
    JENNIFER BANKIER, Dalhousie Law School
Electronic Journals: Abolishing the Legal Impediments
    DENIS S. MARSHALL, Faculty of Law, Queen's University
Electronic Journals: Defining the Relationships
    ROBERT FRANSON, Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia
 
10:20 Break
 
10:40 Session 6: Changing Technology for Information Access I
 
Adobe Acrobat - The Electronic Journal Catalyst?
Speaker T.B.A.
Video Processing for Multimedia
Speaker T.B.A.
Interactive Images for Electronic Journals
Speaker T.B.A.
 
12:00 Lunch
 
13:00 Session 7: Changing Technology for Information Access II           =
 
The HyTime Document Language
Speaker T.B.A.
Speech Processing for Electronic Journals
Speaker T.B.A.
New Techniques for Text, Image and Sound Compression
    WITOLD KINSNER, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of
Manitoba
 
14:30 Question Period
 
15:10 Break
 
15:30 Session 8: Whither Hence?
 
Summary of Proceedings
    LARRY W. HURTADO, Religion, University of Manitoba
 
17:00 Conference closes
 
--------------------------------------------------------------
Registration Information
 
Fees:
If paid by September 1, 1993:  $150.00 (Cdn)
If paid after September 1, 1993: $200.00 (Cdn)
Dinner for Guests of participants:  $30.00 (Cdn)
 
An "ice-breaker" session will be held after our Pre-Registration on
September 30. A banquet is also being planned for the evening of Friday,
October 1. Costs for both events are included in the registration fee.
Participants are responsible for all other meals.
 
Requests for information or the completed Conference Registration Form
together with payment should be sent to:
 
Co-ordinator
Institute for Humanities
University of Manitoba
Room 108 Isbister Building
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2
FAX: (204) 275-5781
Phone: (204) 474-9599
E-Mail: umih@ccu.umanitoba.ca
 
Accommodation
 
The Conference will be held in the Manitoba Room at the Delta Winnipeg
Hotel conveniently located downtown. The facilities at the Delta
include a fitness centre, a heated indoor pool, a sauna area, etc.
 
Restaurants in all price ranges are within easy walking distance. We
have arranged an attractive hotel rate of $65/night, which is the same
for either single or double occupancy.Taxi service from the airport to
the hotel is approximately $11.00.
 
The City of Winnipeg
 
Winnipeg is a city with a population of more than 600,000. In early
 
October the weather is cool but pleasant, with the temperatures usually
averaging 10=F8C. (50=F8F.) during the day. Winnipeg is the home of the
world famous Royal Winnipeg Ballet and has its own Symphony Orchestra.
It also has an IMAX Theatre, an Art Gallery, a Planetarium, and a Theatre
Centre. Other attractions include the Winnipeg Mint, Assiniboia Downs,
the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, a European-style casino,and many parks.
 
By Air
 
Canadian Airlines International has been selected as "the official
airline" for our Conference. For those attending from points in Canada,
Canadian is offering 15% off the full economy fare. Should you qualify
for advanced purchase fares, Canadian is offering a 5% discount off
published year-round excursion fares (within Canada only). Contact
Canadian Airlines' Conventionair Office (1-800-665-5554) or your
travel agent, and be sure to mention number 4369.
 
Acknowledgements
 
We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the following organizations
in making this Conference possible:
 
* Humanities Federation of Canada
* Association of Research Libraries
* Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
* Canadian Association of Learned Journals
* Social Science Federation of Canada
* Legal Research Institute
The University of Manitoba
 
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM
 
Last Name                                                     First Name   =
Title (Prof./Dr./Mr./Mrs./Ms.)              Preferred Name for Name Badge=
Organization                                                               =
Address                                                                    =
City                         Province/State                          Country
Postal Code
Business Telephone No.
Residence Telephone No.
E-mail/FAX No.                                                             =
Meals: Special Dietary Requirements (specify)                              =
(e.g., diabetic, vegetarian, etc.)                                         =
Banquet Preference                                                         =
Choice of:
Salmon [     ]    Beef [     ]
Other Requirements: (e.g., physical handicap, etc.) Please specify.
Fees: (including GST)
Before September 1, 1993 $150.00 (Cdn)
After September 1, 1993: $200.00 (Cdn)
Dinner for Guest:  $ 30.00 (Cdn)
 
Please make your cheque or money order payable to The University of
Manitoba. Registrations must be accompanied by full payment of
registration fees. All fees are payable in Canadian funds. For
practical reasons, enrolment is limited to 200 participants.
 
Cancellation: Requests for a full refund must be received by September
15, 1993. No refunds will be made after this date.
 
Travel Arrangements: Canadian Airlines International has been selected
as "the official carrier" for our Conference. For those attending from
points in Canada, Canadian is offering 15% off the full economy fare.
Should you qualify for advanced purchase fares, Canadian is offering a
5% discount off published year-round excursion fares (within Canada
only). Contact Canadian Airlines Conventionair Office (1-800-665-5554)
or your travel agent, and be sure to mention Convention Number 4369.
 
Further inquiries may be directed to: Co-ordinator, Institute for the
Humanities, University of Manitoba, Room 108 Isbister Bldg., Winnipeg,
Manitoba, R3T 2N2, Canada. [Telephone: (204) 474-9599; FAX: (204) 275-
5781; E-mail: umih@ccu.umanitoba.ca.]
 
G.S.T. Registration Number: R119260669.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 6 Sep 1993 12:23:24 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      VPIEJ-L Resources
 
                             VPIEJ-L Resources
 
These resources provide access to the VPIEJ-L list and/or archives of VPIEJ-L
posts.  Additional files relevant to electronic journal publishing are
available at the FTP, Gopher, Listserv and WWW sites.
 
FTP Archive:
The Scholarly Communications Project of Virginia Tech has an anonymous FTP
archive which includes the VPIEJ-L archive, along with many electronic texts
and electronic publishing utilities.  To access this site, FTP to
BORG.LIB.VT.EDU and login as userid anonymous.  This FTP archive is available
to the Gopher literate through the Gopher at gopher.micro.umn.edu.  Select item
5, Internet file server (FTP) sites/, then item 2, Popular FTP Sites via
Gopher/.
 
Gopher Access:
The FTP archive files are available via a Gopher+ server at borg.lib.vt.edu
port 5070.  VPIEJ-L files are in /pub/vpiej-l.
 
Listserv Archive:
There is a listserv archive available at listserv@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu
(listserv@vtvm1 for BITNET) for VPIEJ-L.  Send a command as the body of a mail
message to get a current filelist: INDEX VPIEJ-L to listserv.  Use the get
command to retrieve items from the archive in a mail message: GET EJ-BIB TXT.
 
Usenet Gateway:
Subscribers may want to consider reading VPIEJ-L on Usenet.  Check with your
system administrator to see if your site receives bit.listserv.vpiej-l.  If it
does, you can unsubscribe your email account by sending a SIGNOFF VPIEJ-L
command to listserv@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu.  You will still be able to post to the
list by email to vpiej-l@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu.  If your site does not carry this
group, please encourage them to add it.
 
WAIS Source:
The discussion logs for the VPIEJ-L list are searchable via WAIS.  The wais
source may be retrieved from the directory-of-servers by searching for VPIEJ-L,
or by FTP to borg.lib.vt.edu in the pub/WAIS/sources directory.
 
World Wide Web Access:
Point your WWW or Xmosaic client at the Scholarly Communications Project page:
http://borg.lib.vt.edu/z-borg/www/.  There is a link to a hypertext
version of the VPIEJ-L discussion archives, which are still under construction.
There is also a link to the Usenet newsgroup bit.listserv.vpiej-l.
 
-----------------------
VPIEJ-L@VTVM1
VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
bit.listserv.vpiej-l
 
     VPIEJ-L is a discussion list for electronic publishing issues, especially
those related to Scholarly Electronic Journals.  Topics for discussion include
SGML, PostScript, and other e-journal formats; as well as software and hardware
considerations for creation of, storage, and access to e-journals.  Publishers,
editors, technical staff, programmers, librarians, and end-users are welcome
to join.  One goal of the list is to provide better feedback from users to
creators, so we are very interested in receiving and archival issues.  This
should give those of us involved in publishing an idea as to what distribution
methods work and how end-users are accessing and using these publications.
Current readers of and contributors to VPIEJ-L have discussed readability
and screen display, copyright, and advertising (noncommercial).
 
Archives of VPIEJ-L are available.  A listing may be retrieved by sending a
command INDEX VPIEJ-L to LISTSERV@VTVM1.
 
To subscribe, send the following command to LISTSERV@VTVM1 via mail or
interactive message:
    SUB VPIEJ-L your_full_name
where "your_full_name" is your name.  For example:
    SUB VPIEJ-L Joan Doe
 
Or you may read and post to VPIEJ-L via Usenet in the group
bit.listserv.vpiej-l
 
Owner: James Powell 
 
James Powell ... Library Automation, University Libraries, VPI&SU
1-4986       ... JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
             ... jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             ... Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
Archives: http://borg.lib.vt.edu:80/   gopher://oldborg.lib.vt.edu:70/
          file://borg.lib.vt.edu/~ftp
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 6 Sep 1993 16:06:32 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         paulie@echonyc.com
Subject:      Where should we publish?
 
 
<> Paul Blaser                          06-SEP-93 14:24
                 paulie@echonyc
 I am the desktop publishing person for a
 non-profit research institute.
 We publish two family planning journals,
 one bi-monthly and the other quarterly, as
 well as a couple books each year. We also
 have databases full of relevant demographic
 information.
 
 We are looking into publishing at least one
 of the journals on the Internet, with an eye
 toward possibly making the rest of the
 publications and the databases avaliable in
 the future.
 
 Some of the decisions we are faced with include:
 Do we set our own machine up as an ftp site,
 or do we post the journal elsewhere (CICNet)?
 
 Should we limit ourselves to one site, or publish
 in a variety of places?
 
 Many of our articles are full of graphs.
 Do we provide these as GIFs, omit them, or handle
 them some other way?
 
 Should we post abstracts of articles on listserves, etc.?
 What is the etiquitte of this sort of thing.
 
 Any advice is welcome and appreciated.
 
 Paul Blaser
 Blaspf52@snyoneva.bitnet
 or
 paulie@echonyc.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 7 Sep 1993 09:05:48 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Carol Hutchins 
Subject:      Re: Where should we publish?
In-Reply-To:   from "paulie@echonyc.com" at Sep 6, 93 04:06:32 pm
 
>
>
> <> Paul Blaser                          06-SEP-93 14:24
>                  paulie@echonyc
>  I am the desktop publishing person for a
>  non-profit research institute.
>  We publish two family planning journals,
>  one bi-monthly and the other quarterly, as
>  well as a couple books each year. We also
>  have databases full of relevant demographic
>  information.
>
>  We are looking into publishing at least one
>  of the journals on the Internet, with an eye
>  toward possibly making the rest of the
>  publications and the databases avaliable in
>  the future.
>
>  Some of the decisions we are faced with include:
>  Do we set our own machine up as an ftp site,
>  or do we post the journal elsewhere (CICNet)?
>
 
The people editing your new electronic journal should seriously
look at trying to get the content of the publication reviewed
and abstracted/indexed by the chief indexing services in the
discipline, in your case, probably Sociological Abstracts, or
the Social Science Index (H.W. Wilson, Inc.).
 
This step seems to me to be an important one in getting
the content of electronic scholarly publications viewed on
the same plane as paper ones.
 
The people working at the secondary publications are, of course,
then faced with the question of how to cite them, indicate their
length, format, etc, not to mention where the files are available.
 
                        --Carol Hutchins
                          NYU Courant Institute Library
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 7 Sep 1993 09:06:54 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Hannah King." 
Subject:      Re: Complete ejournal archives
 
I'd really love to flame back at Mr Moser for the use of "chipheads" which
I take to be a put-down, however, I decided that poised, rational, calm,
meditative, tolerant, and open discussion is far more important than adding
to the "Men's War Over the Internet" (see PACS-L for _that_ discussion_).
 
Question: Mr Moser, if archives are designed only to preserve why do they
exist?  For what purpose are they preserving anything?  I know, Iknow you
didn't actually mean they just preserve.  But you did say that "Libraries
exist to provide access.  Libraries are not archives.  Archives exist ...
to preserve (?)."
 
Another question:  If libraries only exist to provide access  ... what on
earth do they provide access to  ... ?
 
Definition:  archive -- a place in which public records or historical
documents are preserved (libraries do archive public records and historical
materials  -- are electronic recp
 
 
ords "public records?"  could they some
day be historical records?)
        archive (verb) -- to file or collect (hmmm, libraries do file and
collect materials, don't they?)
        archpriest -- a priest of preeminent rank  (archivists and librarians
might want to avoid assuming the role of high priest/priestess in favor of
a more science based practice).
 
Question:  Are electronic materials housed and maintained by volunteers
worth preserving?  If yes, when, where, and how?  If not, what good are
they?  Are they even worth the time to find them, learn to access them, and
access, read, and store them?
 
Hannah King
SUNY HSC Library at Syracuse
766 Irving Avenue
Syracuse, NY  13210-2339
315-464-7109
315-464-7199 (fax)
kingh@snysyrv1
kingh@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 8 Sep 1993 17:29:03 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         David Robison 
Subject:      Re: Where should we publish?
 
 
<> Paul Blaser                          06-SEP-93 14:24
                 paulie@echonyc
> Some of the decisions we are faced with include:
> Do we set our own machine up as an ftp site,
> or do we post the journal elsewhere (CICNet)?
 
I recommend both.  Set up your own archive so you have complete
control over at least one publicly accessible version.  Have
someone else keep a copy so that if your server is down or
overwhelmed, another site is available.
 
 
> Should we limit ourselves to one site, or publish
> in a variety of places?
 
See above.
 
> Many of our articles are full of graphs.
> Do we provide these as GIFs, omit them, or handle
> them some other way?
 
This is tough.  You may want to consider offering an ASCII-only
version with associated GIFs in addition to PostScript or PDF
version.
 
> Should we post abstracts of articles on listserves, etc.?
> What is the etiquitte of this sort of thing.
 
This would depend on the list.  You may want to post the abstracts
for the premier issue, then only by subscription.  You probably should
ask the list owner what is best for that list.
 
David F. W. Robison                Internet: drobison@library.berkeley.edu
Editor, Current Cites                            Bitnet: drobison@ucblibra
Information Systems Instruction & Support             Voice: (510)643-9494
UC Berkeley Library                                     Fax: (510)643-7891
Berkeley, CA 94720
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 8 Sep 1993 17:31:31 EDT
Reply-To:     "Tansin A. Darcos & Company" <0005066432@MCIMAIL.COM>
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Tansin A. Darcos & Company" <0005066432@MCIMAIL.COM>
Subject:      Re: Where should we publish?
 
From: Paul Robinson 
Organization: Tansin A. Darcos & Company, Silver Spring, MD USA
-----
Paul Blaser , writes:
 
> I am the desktop publishing person for a non-profit research
> institute. We publish two family planning journals, one
> bi-monthly and the other quarterly ... We are looking into
> publishing at least one of the journals on the Internet ...
> Some of the decisions we are faced with include:
> Do we set our own machine up as an ftp site... Should we
> limit ourselves to one site, or publish in a variety of places?
 
If you have the resources for connections and the space to store
them.  There are many "public" ftp sites that handle uploads, such
as oak.oakland.edu which has the capacity to handle 400 simultaneous
FTP requests.
 
Some ftp sites are doing "mirroring".  One site holds a file and
others will copy it onto their site so as to duplicate it there.
 
> Many of our articles are full of graphs. Do we provide
> these as GIFs, omit them, or handle them some other way?
 
You can use Postscript for text files that contain charts, graphs or
other material.  This also allows you to preseve fonts, sizes,
special lettering, italic, etc.
 
Unless the document is totally useless without the graph, I would
suggest releasing it in two forms: the file name with the extension
".txt" for a plain ascii document of text only, and the Poscript
format with everything as the same named file ending in ".ps".
 
For example
  charging.txt
  charging.ps
 
A file dealing with price charging for computer time.
 
>  Should we post abstracts of articles on listserves, etc.?
>  What is the etiquitte of this sort of thing.
 
If you can find one that will put it up, may I suggest placing your
files on Gopher servers that deal with the particular context.
 
 
 
 
---
Paul Robinson - TDARCOS@MCIMAIL.COM
-----
The following Automatic Fortune Cookie was selected only for this message:
 
A lot of people I know believe in positive thinking, and so do I.  I
believe everything positively stinks.
                -- Lew Col
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 10 Sep 1993 08:24:12 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Pat Weaver-Meyers 
Subject:      pub titled "Surfaces"
 
I'm having problems retrieving an electronic publication entitled: Surfaces.
OCLC bib record indicates an address of harfang.cc.umontreal.ca.  However,
I can't get in at that address and can't find it at castor.iro.umontreal.ca.
 
Does anyone on this list know where this journal is archived or how it
is listed at Univ. of Montreal??
 
Please respond to me at: patwm@uoknor.edu
 
Thanks in advance.
 
Pat Weaver-Meyers
Univ of Oklahoma
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 10 Sep 1993 10:13:33 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: pub titled "Surfaces"
In-Reply-To:  <199309101236.AA18641@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "Pat
              Weaver-Meyers" at Sep 10, 93 08:24:12 am
 
>
> I'm having problems retrieving an electronic publication entitled: Surfaces.
> OCLC bib record indicates an address of harfang.cc.umontreal.ca.  However,
> I can't get in at that address and can't find it at castor.iro.umontreal.ca.
>
> Does anyone on this list know where this journal is archived or how it
> is listed at Univ. of Montreal??
>
> Please respond to me at: patwm@uoknor.edu
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Pat Weaver-Meyers
> Univ of Oklahoma
>
For the benefit of the whole list, let me say that Surfaces is available
via anonymous ftp through harfang.cc.umontreal.ca or, more simply, through
ftp.umontreal.ca. It is located in the Surfaces directory. Macintosh articles
and ascii articles are available for volumes 1, 2 and on-going vol. 3. Gif
graphics for the Escher article in vol 1 are also available. WordPerfect
articles for DOS and Windows are presently under construction and
will be availabel shortly. We may add PostScript but are a bit daunted by the
size of the henerated files and the problems this raises for people
who want to transfer such articles to their personal computer via a 2400 bps
modem. So, for the moment, this alternative remains a mere hypothesis.
 
Surfaces is a refereed journal, now in its third year of production, indexed
in the MLA bibliography, offering formatted articles to its readers. Its
philosophy is that knowledge is most efficiently validated by peer review,
best distributed by electronic means, and best used if people can easily
print what they really want to study (in contradistinction with browsing
which can be done on screen) in a format that looks like an offprint.
 
Gopher access is also available, in particular through CICnet.
 
I hope this answers most initial questions people might have about
Surfaces.
 
I forgot to add that the articles and reviews in Surfaces deal mainly
with cultural studies.
 
Please write to me individually if you have further questions, comments
or suggestions. And allow me to thank all of you for your interest in
our electronic journal. I will be discussing it on amore theoretical level
at the forthcoming Manitoba conference on refereed e-journals.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
co-editor Surfaces
guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 13 Sep 1993 08:11:38 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Norman Schmuff 443-9620 
Subject:      FDA Electronic Submissions (CANDA)
 
(sent simultaneously to several LISTS)
 
Many options are currently being explored for electronic regulatory submission
at the US Food and Drug Administration. These electronic documents are
generally referred to as CANDAs (Computer Assisted New Drug Applications). One
small project is underway, in conjunction with a few pharmaceutical firms, to
prototype an electronic regulatory submission, based on non-proprietary file
interchange formats.  File formats will include SGML for text, and CGM for
vectorized graphics.  Other chemistry specific file formats being considered
are: for chemical structure/reactions SMD, and MDL's MOLFILE; and for
analytical instrument data netCDF and JCAMP.
 
 
This project is largely modeled on those standards promoted by the Department
of Defense in the CALS initiative.  The project is currently restricted to a
portion of the "Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls" (CMC) section.  The
first public showing will be 13 and 14 October in Philadelphia at a meeting
sponsored by the Graphics Communication Association (GCA).  For more
information contact:
  Graphics Communication Association
  100 Daingerfield Rd
  Alexandria, VA 22314-2867
  703-519-8160,  703-548-8160 (FAX)
 
Comments or suggestions on this specific project should be sent personally to
me:
  schmuffn @ fdacd.bitnet
  (DO NOT REPLY DIRECTLY TO THIS LISTSERV MESSAGE WHICH WILL DISTRIBUTE
   YOUR REPLY TO _EVERYONE_ ON THIS LIST)
I am particularly interested in stuff relating to chemistry related issues,
like SGML markup for connection tables and ways to handle spectral and
chromatographic data.
 
Norman R. Schmuff, Ph.D.
FDA, HFD-530
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 14 Sep 1993 08:08:59 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Dieke van Wijnen 
Subject:      Software for generating citation complying to Vancouver style
 
This morning I received a request from one of our authors I could not
respond to and am wondering if one of you may have an answer: He is looking
for computer reference management software which will facilitate compliance
of their citation to Vancouver requirements. Are any of you aware of
anything on the market like this? Please respond to me directly, thanks.
Dieke van Wijnen
Wolters Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands
vanWijnen@WKAP.nl
=========================================================================
Date:         Sun, 26 Sep 1993 16:22:17 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Meckler Corporation 
Subject:      Internet World Conf.
 
INTERNET WORLD '93 and DOCUMENT DELIVERY WORLD '93
 
Conference and Exhibition Dealing with the Commercial and Non-
Commcercial Utilization of these Services and the Impact they Have
on Information Providers and Users
 
December 6-9, 1993
Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York City
 
Sponsored by Internet World Magazine and Document Delivery
World Magazine, Meckler Corporation
 
Conference Program
Meckler has created workshops and seminars designed for
professionals and end-users in several interest categories. You
decide which workshops or seminars are right for you. There are 8
pre-conference workshops, 41 seminars and 4 post-conference
workshops that address your specific needs. INTERNET WORLD '93 is
unequaled in the industry. It is the only program built around the
concept of the delivery of information on the Interent.
 
Exhibit Hall
Over 100 exhibitors will be showcasing a universe of the latest
products, programs and services related to Internet utilization and
electronic Document Delivery. You can explore the world of Internet
by testing the "super electronic highway" at numerous hook-ups in
our exhibit hall. INTERNET WORLD is the trade show for information
and technology related to Internet services. Register now and begin
your successful competition in the "information world" of
tomorrow.
 
Featured Topics
Document Delivery and the Internet, Basics for small Institutions,
Navigating the Net, Leasing & copyright, Government information on
the Net, Getting connected, Market based global Libraries, Wireless
access, Electronic texts, Doing business on the Internet, Cost
justifying the Internet, NREN and publishers, Fax publishing,
Publishing on the Internet, National Networks, Protocols and
standards, Retrieval tools, Community networking
 
Full conference (not including workshops): $325
One day registration: $165
Group registrations available
Preconference and Postconference workshops available
 
INTERNET WORLD '93 AND
DOCUMENT DELIVERY WORLD '93
11 Ferry Lane West, Westport, CT 06880
Tel: 800-MECKLER (632-5537); 203-226-6967
Fax: 800-858-3144; 203-454-5840
E-mail: Internet: meckler @jvnc.net
CompuServe: 70373,616; AppleLink: Meckler
 
To receive a full conference program by mail, please send your
mailing address to meckler@jvnc.net. To receive the program by
email, respond to the same address. Subject line: IW 93 Conf.
 
Thank you.
Tony Abbott, meckler@jvnc.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 28 Sep 1993 08:28:45 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         duxbury@sfu.ca
Subject:      On-screen editing references
 
I work on a printed journal in the social sciences. Our editing is
currently done on paper, and changes transferred to disk by a second
individual. We find this very inefficient and time-consuming and are
attempting to coax our copy editor into editing onscreen.
 
Could you recommend any articles, guides, or stories to help her make
this transition? In particular, she is concerned about how to track
what has been done to files, and what is left to do, so that "almost
ready" files aren't sent off in error.
 
BTW, We are using MS Word 5.5 for the IBM.
 
Thanks for any assistance you can offer.
 
Nancy Duxbury
duxbury@sfu.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 28 Sep 1993 16:25:51 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         steven cherry 
Subject:      Re: On-screen editing references
In-Reply-To:  <199309281249.AA25365@panix.com>
 
 
> I work on a printed journal in the social sciences. Our editing is
> currently done on paper, and changes transferred to disk by a second
> individual. We find this very inefficient and time-consuming and are
> attempting to coax our copy editor into editing onscreen.
>
> Could you recommend any articles, guides, or stories to help her make
> this transition? In particular, she is concerned about how to track
> what has been done to files, and what is left to do, so that "almost
> ready" files aren't sent off in error.
>
> BTW, We are using MS Word 5.5 for the IBM.
 
I'm not sure I understand the copyeditor's concerns here, though there are
others (concerns that is). How does she keep track of copyedits on paper?
One can see which edits have been made, but not which ones have not been!
 
The main concern we have had has had nothing to do with the copyeditor per
se, it's how to track edits on our end, and the author's. What kind of
audit trail is there so that a mistake found in blue lines (for example)
can be traced back to the copyeditor, as opposed to the author or, more
likely, the typesetter. For this we have started to use the redline
facilities of Xywrite (though WordPerfect, and other word processors have
them, and there are dedicated redline packages, such as Red Pencil, as
well).
 
Ultimately, for some journals at least, we will be copyediting them
in-house (which we are not doing now by and large) as well as typesetting
them in-house (which we are doing with a number of journals, a number
which will continue to increase). At that point, tracking will be largely
of interest only to the inter-departmental finger-pointers, and we will
probably let the author fend for himself figuring out what changes have
been made by the copyeditor (he or she will have the original ms., and the
page proof, but no intermediate copyedited ms. or red-line printout).
 
--
  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
  Steven Cherry,                   Manager, Publishing Technologies
  Elsevier Science Publishing,     655 Sixth Ave  New York NY 10010
  212/633-3858/w      212/633-3797/f                  stc@panix.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 28 Sep 1993 16:26:14 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Subject:      *ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY* 1, 4
 
 
*ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY:
COMMUNICATING THE CLASSICS*
 
As a subscriber to the electronic journal you are being contacted to
let you know that Volume 1 Issue 4 (September 1993) is now
available for access.  The contents follow.
 
*ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY:
COMMUNICATING THE CLASSICS*
 
ISSN 1320-3606
 
Peter Toohey (Founding Editor)
Ian Worthington (Editor)
 
VOL. 1 ISSUE 4 - SEPTEMBER 1993
 
(01) LIST OF CONTENTS
 
(02) EDITORIAL
 
(03) GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS
 
(04) ARTICLES
 
Becker, Andrew S., 'A Short Essay on Deconstruction and
        Plato's *Ion*'
Economou, Maria, 'Euesperides: A Devastated Site'
Morse, M., 'On the Utility of Classical Etymology for
        Sociology'
Thompson, L., 'Roman Perceptions of Blacks'
 
(05) OBLOQUY
 
Keen, Tony, Aristophanes' *Lysistrata*
        (to Sallie R. Goetsch, *EA* 1,3, August 1993)
Goetsch, Sallie R., Aristophanes' *Lysistrata*: A Reply
        to Tony Keen
 
(06) POETRY
 
Baker, Robert J., 'Panting for God.  A Version of Prudentius,
        *Peristephanon* Liber 3'
Wilson, Lyn, 'Ulysses, A Butterfly'
 
(07) J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM by Kenneth Hamma
 
Recent Acquisitions and Lectures
 
(08) *SCHOLIA*
 
Editorial note and contents for Volume 2 (1994)
Supplied by Bill Dominik
 
(09) CONFERENCES
 
The Greek and Roman Book, University of Minnesota (programme)
The Horace Bimillennium, UCLA (Programme)
 
(10) VACANCIES
 
AUSTRALIA:
Classicist: University of Melbourne
 
U.S.A.:
Archaeologist (2 posts): Bryn Mawr College
Archaeologist: Oriental Institute, Chicago
 
(11) KEEPING IN TOUCH
 
Electronic Forums & Repositories for the Classics
        by Ian Worthington
 
 
*Electronic Antiquity* Vol. 1 Issue 4 - September 1993
edited by Peter Toohey and Ian Worthington
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
ISSN 1320-3606
------------------------
 
A general announcement (aimed at non-subscribers) that
the journal is available will be made in approximately 12
hours time over the lists - as a subscriber you will be
automatically contacted in advance when future issues
are available.
 
Access is via gopher or ftp (instructions below).
 
Volume 1 Issue 5 will be published in October.
 
The editors welcome contributions.
 
HOW TO ACCESS
 
Access is via gopher or ftp.
The journal file name of this issue is 1,4-September1993;
Volume 1 Issues 1-3 may also be accessed in the same way.
 
GOPHER:
 
-- info.utas.edu.au and through gopher:
-- open top level document called Publications
-- open Electronic Antiquity.
-- open 1,4-September1993
-- open (01)contents first for list of contents, then other files as appropriate
 
FTP:
 
-- FTP.utas.edu.au (or ftp.info.utas.edu.au)
        --> departments --> classics --> antiquity.
-- In Antiquity you will see the files as described above.
 
Since a few people had problems accessing the journal via ftp,
here are the stages in more detail:
 
at your system prompt: FTP
at the subsequent prompt: open FTP.utas.edu.au
at login prompt: anonymous
at password: your username (which won't show)
then: cd departments
then: cd classics
then: cd antiquity
then: ls -l
then: cd 1,4-September1993
then: ls -l
   You will now have a list of the various directories (the 'd'
   beginning each line 'drwx....' indicates you're dealing with
   a directory)
then: cd (into whichever directory you want)
then: ls -l
   If the first character in the line is not 'd', you've got a file.
   Use the 'get' command plus the file name to download.  If you're
   still in a directory, use the 'ls-l' command to list its contents.
        Use 'get' to transfer files.
 
To move back up the directory tree:
 
type: cdup
then: ls -l
 
And repeat the process.
 
If still having trouble, try, once you have the directory list for
the journal:
 
Type (for example)       cd (04)Articles
Your response should be 'CWD command successful', but no list.
Type                     ls-l
Your response should be a list of fours articles in a form such as:
-rw-rw-r--1  1689  77030  Sep 28  23:09 Becker-Plato
        etc for the rest
Type  get Becker-Plato
and you should have a copy.
 
A final alternative if a space is magically inserted in the parenthesis
of the file number (e.g. of 'Articles' file) is to specify:
 
CD ./(04)Articles
 
Please also be very careful when ftping *not* to leave *any* spaces
in file names or make typos.
 
Do NOT use Telnet.
 
The best way to access the journal (in terms of both ease and
time) is by gopher, and we would urge you to do so.  The
structure of the journal is also more easily recognisable on gopher.
 
Please try to access *here* in Tasmania (eastern Australian
time) either during the night, very early morning or at
weekends, since during the business day the lines are
crammed.  This means you'll need to check with (e.g.)
the international operator for the right time difference,
but at the moment (the following is not an exhaustive list)
Britain is 9 hours behind eastern Australia; Europe, west
to east, 8-6 hours; East Coast U.S.A. 14 hours; West
Coast U.S.A. 17 hours; South America, coastal to eastern,
13-15 hours, South Africa 8 hours; Singapore 2 hours;
and Japan 1 hour.
 
Queries and contributions may be directed to the editors at
:antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au.
 
Peter Toohey (ptoohey@metz.une.edu.au)
Ian Worthington (ian.worthington@classics.utas.edu.au)
 
(end)
---------
Ian Worthington,
Department of Classics,
University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania 7001,
Australia.
Tel. (002) 202294 (direct)
Fax (002) 202186
e-mail:  Ian.Worthington@classics.utas.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 28 Sep 1993 16:26:39 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Lee Jaffe 
Subject:      Re: On-screen editing references
In-Reply-To:  (null)
 
 
I'd like to argue on your copy editor's behalf.  I don't think there is
any reason that all the work has to stay in the electronic environment.
And there are still a lot of good reasons for making a printout and taking
the copy over to a corner somewhere.  Think of it like a painter backing
away from the easel to get a different view of the canvas.
 
On the other hand, I would argue is that once the copy editor has finished
making the changes on the paper copy, s/he should be responsible for
entering the revisions on the word processor.  The computer is the work
environment and s/he should be responsible for producing copy that the
others use.
 
-- Lee Jaffe, UC Santa Cruz
 
 
On Tue, 28 Sep 1993 duxbury@sfu.ca wrote:
 
> I work on a printed journal in the social sciences. Our editing is
> currently done on paper, and changes transferred to disk by a second
> individual. We find this very inefficient and time-consuming and are
> attempting to coax our copy editor into editing onscreen.
>
> Could you recommend any articles, guides, or stories to help her make
> this transition? In particular, she is concerned about how to track
> what has been done to files, and what is left to do, so that "almost
> ready" files aren't sent off in error.
>
> BTW, We are using MS Word 5.5 for the IBM.
>
> Thanks for any assistance you can offer.
>
> Nancy Duxbury
> duxbury@sfu.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 08:17:00 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         james w williams 
Subject:      onscreen editing
 
I'd like to join in the discussion about the benefits of copyediting
onscreen.  It seems to me that that even with redlining (or similar program)
the sticking point is dealing with the author. To make the process work at
its most efficient, one would get a disk, edit onscreen, and send the disk to
the author, who would then read and edit on disk, and send the disk back. The
editor would clean up and send the disk to the compositor. Editor and author
would be responsible for keeping hardcopy at all stages, but no one would be
forced to transfer changes from hardcopy to disk. However, the author has to
be ready to work this way, and so far -- at least in my area of the
humanities (I edit a humanities quarterly) -- one or two authors per issue,
if that many, are capable, willing, or able -- that is, home with their
computer when they get the copyedited manuscript -- to work onscreen. In
other words, editors are more uptodate than authors
 
The question is then is it worth it to do any copyediting onscreen? It saves
money for the press on composing costs, but I don't see any way around having
somebody in the editorial office typing changes in a manuscript into an
electronic file. So I agree with Lee Jaffe's comments on both counts -- the
editor should be responsible for the typing, and there sure seems to getting
around the use of hardcopy manuscripts. However, I am definitely looking for
a way out of hardcopy editing.
jay williams
university of chicago press
jww4@midway.uchicago.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 10:45:15 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         steven cherry 
Subject:      Re: onscreen editing
In-Reply-To:  <199309291228.AA22449@panix.com>
 
On Wed, 29 Sep 1993, james w williams wrote:
 
> I'd like to join in the discussion about the benefits of copyediting
> onscreen.  It seems to me that that even with redlining (or similar program)
> the sticking point is dealing with the author. To make the process work at
> its most efficient, one would get a disk, edit onscreen, and send the disk to
> the author, who would then read and edit on disk, and send the disk back. The
> editor would clean up and send the disk to the compositor. Editor and author
> would be responsible for keeping hardcopy at all stages, but no one would be
> forced to transfer changes from hardcopy to disk. However, the author has to
> be ready to work this way, and so far -- at least in my area of the
> humanities (I edit a humanities quarterly) -- one or two authors per issue,
> if that many, are capable, willing, or able -- that is, home with their
> computer when they get the copyedited manuscript -- to work onscreen. In
> other words, editors are more uptodate than authors
 
I think from the point of view of the publisher, this would be a disaster.
At least it would be for us here. Perhaps it would work in books (though I
have my doubts), but for journals it couldn't possibly. The first problem
is it would devastate the schedule. Second, you would be leaving the
journal editor out of the loop at a crucial editing stage. Third, there
are logistical problems (disk and file formats, tracking, etc.) that are
not worth the effort. Then there is the expense of this additional work.
Finally, and most importantly, for us, the copyeditor does the coding. I'm
sorry, but I cannot allow an author to muck around with a file once it has
been coded, and if the copyeditor has to recheck the file once the author
has mucked around, this is too much time and effort. All this bother to
save the production editor a little time in the correction stage? Or save
the compositor (us, for most of our journals we receive diskettes for) an
hour or two to enter changes for an entire issue? And remember, some
corrections are composition-related, not text-based. There is no way the
copyeditor could know how to make these changes, so we have to go through
the file anyway as compositors, and in some cases undo things the
copyeditor had done.
 
I don't want to sound harsh, but I simply cannot imagine how this works,
and the more I think about it, the more my imagination fails. Perhaps with
a different workflow, I'd be able to picture it, but on ours, which more
or less corresponds to the traditional one, I can't. By traditional
workflow, I mean,
 
- acceptance,
- copyediting,
- composition (page proof),
- review (proofreader, author, journal editor, production editor;
    coallated by the production editor),
- composition and final corrections (repro).
 
--
  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
  Steven Cherry,                   Manager, Publishing Technologies
  Elsevier Science Publishing,     655 Sixth Ave  New York NY 10010
  212/633-3858/w      212/633-3797/f                  stc@panix.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 10:45:41 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Darren McKewen 
Subject:      Re: Editing Electronic References
 
     Regarding the discussion of copy editors doing their work on
     electronic files versus hard copy, my experience is that the
     nature of the work and the nature of the writer dictates which
     method is best.
 
     I edit reference material written by staff
     writers within our company as well as submissions from outside
     authors.  In general, it is fastest and perhaps most efficient to
     do my edits on electronic copy, allow the writer to see the
     revised copy and catch any errors I might have introduced and
     argue over changes I've made, then put the copy through for
     formatting and proofing.
 
     However, editing on hard copy and having the writer put in the
     changes can serve a useful training function when working with
     staff writers our outsiders who will be contributing regularly.
     It takes more time at the outset, but can save time and grief in
     the long run.
 
     A minor example:  If I change the word "Corporation" to "Corp."
     (to meet style guidelines) on paper, and the writer puts in the
     change, he or she will quickly learn to write "Corp."  In
     contrast, if I edit a computer file, the author reviewing my
     changes is unlikely to notice this point.  Week after week, the
     same mistake will be made and I will make the same change.  This
     can be even more important regarding tagging.  Our staff authors
     do most of the SGML tagging for the material they prepare; only
     by having to make necessary changes themselves will they learn
     the tagging scheme.
 
     When editing for structure, electronic editing simply cannot
     (yet) match the impact or clarity of circling sections and
     marking with arrows to show how material should be restructured.
     While it might be easier to do the changes myself, authors
     will not see as clearly how material has been moved around.
     Seeing those football-play-diagrams on paper, authors
     have a better concept of how to organize information in the
     future.
 
     By and large, I hasten to add, the above points would not be
     relevant when dealing with outside authors.  It would be a waste
     of time to send material back to them for rekeying, and most
     would likely rebel at being told to add a comma here and
     capitalize a name there.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 16:52:59 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Ian C.Nelson, Univ. of Sask. Library" 
Subject:      Re: onscreen editing
 
jay williams, university of chicago press, said:
: To make the process work at
: its most efficient, one would get a disk, edit onscreen, and send the disk to
: the author, who would then read and edit on disk, and send the disk back. The
:
        Would it not be even more efficient for editor and author to
        agree to the use of a common word processor (with the redlining
        feature) and to do at least the initial exchanges (at the word
        processing stage) electronically by sending binary files which
        each could read and edit in the common format?
 
        Ian C. Nelson
        Nelson@sklib.usask.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 16:53:20 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         helfrich@siam.org
Subject:      Onscreen Editing
 
  Onscreen editing is a problem with which we are now wrestling.  Currently,
  for author-provided files, we do all our editing on hardcopy and the hardcopy
  is given to our in-house composition specialist or a freelance supplier.  We
  use TeX, and our copy editors are not trained in its use yet.  We will train
  them when we have a WYSIWYG system.  I have done onscreen editing of TeX
  manuscripts, and I must confess that I didn't like it; it seemed less
  efficient to me given the nature of the program.  It's almost impossible to
  spot format problems without a WYSIWYG system.
 
  In the early days of our use of TeX, we did ask the authors to make all
  editorial and format changes.  This, as you can imagine, did not go over
  well.  Now that we have an in-house composition department, the use of TeX
  has risen dramatically.  We still checked hardcopy of the file after it was
  returned from the author.  Logistically, it was a nightmare.  Since we had to
  rely so much on the authors, our schedules got mucked up, too.
 
  Our main problem is being able to indicate to authors what changes have been
  made.  In a highly technical manuscript, even the slightest error introduced
  by the copy editor could result in an errata.  Our authors do pay attention
  to the changes that we make; we must be able to continue to show them what
  they are.  By the same token, sending electronic galley proofs poses problems
  for us.  We are responsible for ensuring that the paper that was accepted is
  not essentially changed during the production process (substantial changes
  require a second review by the editor who accepted the paper).  We do trust
  our authors, but we also must be able to ascertain at a glance what type of
  changes have been made at the galley stage.
 
  Laura B. Helfrich
  Managing Editor
  Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 16:55:02 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      ISSN/query
 
I have the ISSN form sitting before me; and two blanks
challenge me--I'd like to hear how anyone else in a
similar situation dealt with it.
 
We are an e-j without professional association, although
we are refereed, academic, etc.
 
I have to fill in "Publisher" and "Subscription Address".
 
Did you use an e-mail address or a postal address
for subscriptions?  Who did you name as publisher, if
you didn't have the backing of a pub. company or
professional association?
 
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
UC Berkeley
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 29 Sep 1993 16:55:21 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Michael R. Boudreau" 
Subject:      Re: onscreen editing
 
James Williams is right that authors are often neither willing nor able to
deal with their copyedited manuscripts on disk, but this is not an obstacle
to the copy editor's ability to work on disk.
 
Programs with redlining features, such as XyWrite III+, allow the copy
editor to mark text that should be inserted or deleted, and then create a
printout with all this work visible on the hard copy--insertions in
boldface and between braces, and deletions overstruck.  The author can mark
up this hard copy and send it back to the copy editor, who can then make
the final changes on disk.  XyWrite (this is the only such program I know,
and I wish I knew of one for the Mac instead of the PC) also has a feature
that allows you to then make permanent all the redlining at once, or on a
case-by-case basis.
 
--Mike Boudreau
University of Illinois Press
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 30 Sep 1993 08:08:22 EDT
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James O'Donnell 
Subject:      Re: ISSN/query
In-Reply-To:  <9309292100.AA09755@mail.sas.upenn.edu> from "Margaret E Sokolik"
              at Sep 29, 93 04:55:02 pm
 
As e-editor of several related journals (Bryn Mawr Reviews, etc.), I have
filled out that form several times. For "publisher" I put the name of the
journal, for "address" I put the relevant mailing address (where they will
send the form back to with ISSN).  The more interesting question is how to
supply both sample and depository copies, and where I have left it with
them after interesting e-mail was taht if and as they had a way of
receiving such things in e- form I would gladly supply them!
 
Jim O'Donnell
U. of Pennsylvania

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James Powell