VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

February 1994

=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 1 Feb 1994 08:23:45 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
In-Reply-To:  <199401312221.AA18055@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "Lee Jaffe" at
              Jan 31, 94 04:32:03 pm
 
> At this point, we're being asked to take the bad with the good:
> high prices, long delays are married to good quality, and poor quality
> and low reliability are part of speed and informality.  It seems that a
> lot can be gained by splitting scholarly communications into different
> processes and letting each do what it does best.
>
I disagree with Lee Jaffe's last thesis: good quality is NOT inherent
to the printed medium, and, conversely, poor quality and low reliability
are NOT part of speed. As for informality, this is something else, but
it has little to do with a refereed publication, be it electronic
or otherwise. One should not confuse the work that goes on before
storage and diffusion with the medium. In our journal, before
we store and allow for diffusion, we try and do as well as any
refereed printed journal. This includes layout, typographic quality,
quality of writing and quality of thought. We may fail on this, but this
has nothing to do with the medium; it has to do with our own limitations.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Date:         Tue, 1 Feb 1994 08:25:09 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joe 
Subject:      Re: Update on Scholarly Communications at ALA Midwinter
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon, 31 Jan 1994 08:34:59 EST from 
 
The announcement of an exciting session on electronic journal publishing
whets the appetites of many of us who haven't the time/money t0 attend the
conference. Wouldn't it reflect more faith in the network to provide email
addresses for the participants so that we whose noses are pressed against
the candy-store window might request information on these scintillating
topics?
 
Joseph Raben
City University of New York
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 1 Feb 1994 08:25:46 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JF Rowland 
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
 
Thanks to Jean-Claude Guedon for his comments on my comments.  My only point in
reply is, I think, that the key point for me is not whether the publishing
organization is for-profit or not-for-profit, but whether the people doing the
work of publishing it get paid or not.  I remain sceptical that large journals
putting out thousands of documents per annum can be run on a semi-amateur basis.
Fytton Rowland, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
Phone +44 509 223057     Fax +44 509 223023   E-mail J.F.Rowland@lut.ac.uk
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:28:46 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         steven cherry 
Subject:      Re: Journals as commodities
In-Reply-To:  <199401271933.AA19549@panix.com>
 
On Thu, 27 Jan 1994, Stevan Harnad wrote:
 
> Michael Boudreau is right that there is a great divide between
> the preprint and the published literature, and that divide is peer
> review. [...]
 
I find this a bit puzzling. My picture of making preprints available is
pre-copyediting and -typesetting, but not pre-peer review, and that the
main beneficiary of electronic preprint services is those journals/areas
where 1-3 year production delays exist. The great divide is copyediting,
typesetting, proofreading, artwork, printing, indexing, and archiving, as
well as marketing and distribution.
 
--
  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
  Steven Cherry,                   Manager, Publishing Technologies
  Elsevier Science Publishing,     655 Sixth Ave  New York NY 10010
  212/633-3858/w      212/633-3797/f    stc@acm.org   stc@panix.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:30:14 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JMUCKERHEIDE@delphi.com
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
 
Fytton Rowland, (J.F.Rowland@lut.ac.uk), correctly states that major
publications can not be run on a "semi-amateur" basis. But the issue he more
correctly identifies is whether the "people doing the work get paid or not".
By this it seems that the issue is not "semi-amateur" but rather "volunteer"
basis, presumably by non-amateurs. But then it seems to me that the issue of
whether the people are getting paid or not is really a question of how are
they getting paid. Are they getting paid from funds that are directly
generated by the "subscription" and associated copyright payment processes,
or are they getting paid by other support funds that are not dependent on
(high cost) publication revenues. Many research programs, institutions,
organizations and societies already contribute substantially to
non-paper/printing publication costs in demands on everything from submittal
form and quality to page charges. Electronic publication can support receipt
of distributable research with hard guidelines, and even form and content
templates/software, automated reviewer distributions and comment resolution
support software. The funds to support a relatively small professional staff
to manage journal publication, which can vary substantially (from a low end
nearly as low as some of the moderated electronic newsletters currently in
existance if materials are received in standardized text and graphics
components, or abstracted with ftp document identification for document
access), can come from a variety of institution, professional society,
foundation grants, government support through numerous mechanisms depending
on the topic (directly by executive agencies, to National Academy of Science
program funding, to Library of Congress, to program grants to universities,
etc - as are already being done) and even, as with page charges, author
fees, to pay this professional staff with little burden, and even savings,
on the resources of the institutions involved, e.g., library funds presently
being committed to subscriptions. Making the literature freely available by
getting the funds to pay the production costs will be more beneficial to
involved institutions, libraries, and scientific and public policy
communities than maintaining the dependence on paying the production staff
through traditional subscription/reprint, etc fees.
 
If the real issue is the "publisher's" "business opportunity", there is
still a commercial opportunity to fill a need: be a cost effective
administrator and electronic distributor, find thse topics and institutions
with e-pub needs, and contract to provide the support, being a success by
competing to make the product most available and accessible to the
electronic world.
 
Jim Muckerheide (jmuckerheide@delphi.com)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:30:35 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JMUCKERHEIDE@delphi.com
Subject:      Re: Update on Scholarly Communicatio
 
And wouldn't it also reflect more faith in the network to publish the
materials of the conference participants in advance, (titles/abstracts with
ftp file addresses for retrieval?), organized by session, with an
opportunity for input and response from the larger interested participants,
so that those responses and contributions can be factored into the
presentations by session organizers and conference principals, and with the
promise that conference notes on significant sessions and/or presentations
will be distributed (or identified for retreival) to the community?
 
Jim Muckerheide
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:31:27 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Tom Bayston Jr." 
Subject:      Re: Update on Scholarly Communications at ALA Midwinter
In-Reply-To:  <199402011330.AA23915@pegasus.cc.ucf.edu>
 
It seems ironic, if not downright presumptuous, not to provide online
participation in such conferences at minimal registration fees, similar
to the creative writing conference planned for this spring at U. of
Missouri, or the 7th Annual European Writing Conference in The Netherlands;
the software to conduct multiple-user on-line forums similar to IRC *is*
available.
 
On Tue, 1 Feb 1994, Joe wrote:
 
> The announcement of an exciting session on electronic journal publishing
> whets the appetites of many of us who haven't the time/money t0 attend the
> conference. Wouldn't it reflect more faith in the network to provide email
> addresses for the participants so that we whose noses are pressed against
> the candy-store window might request information on these scintillating
> topics?
>
> Joseph Raben
> City University of New York
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:32:03 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Todd A. Jacobs" 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Electronic Review Literary Magazine
 
I would like to announce that the Electronic Review Literary Magazine is
now available for FTP@clark.net /clarknet/opt/ftp/pub/jacobs as
ER-9402.ZIP.
 
The Electronic Review is an MS-DOS hypertext magazine designed to
showcase emerging writers and computer artists.   Each issue contains
fiction, poetry, raytraced and ansi artwork, as well as original computer
comic strips.
 
The magazine is distributed as shareware.  Please contact me directly for
further information.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. todd.jacobs@f182.n109.z1.fidonet.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Feb 1994 15:32:13 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Eric Crump 
Subject:      Re: Update on Scholarly Communicatio
In-Reply-To:  Message of Wed,
              2 Feb 1994 09:30:35 EST from 
 
On Wed, 2 Feb 1994 09:30:35 EST  said:
>And wouldn't it also reflect more faith in the network to publish the
>materials of the conference participants in advance...
 
Yes, Jim! Yes! And I'm happy to say that some conferences are starting
to do just that. The one I'm organizing this year, the Tenth Computers
and Writing Conference will have all presentation and program information
available over the net in advance (a precedent set for this conference
last year when it was hosted by the University of Michigan) as well
as online discussions about the issues those materials raise. We are
aiming, to the greatest extent we can manage it, to blend and blur
the onsite and online aspects of the conference. Best of both worlds,
is what we're after.
 
--Eric Crump, University of Missouri
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Feb 1994 15:33:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Scholarly Communications Updates
In-Reply-To:  <9402021450.AA03965@a.cni.org> from "JMUCKERHEIDE@delphi.com" at
              Feb 2, 94 09:30:14 am
 
To those who expressed some annoyance at not having the reports from
the ALA Scholarly Communications Committee meeting shared on the
Internet -- maybe some further information might lessen the upset.
 
The session announced was an informal reporting and discussing forum at
the upcoming American Library Association Midwinter meeting.  The
presenters were not asked to prepare formal addresses to a specified
audience.  There won't be any papers as such.  There will be a group of
people in a small meeting room listening and asking questions.  In many
ways, this is the physical counterpart of what happens on focused
discussion lists such as this one.
 
In fact, at ALA Midwinter, there are no formal programs as such, just
working groups, discussion groups, and informational sessions.  In such
a case, it would be very hard to make available the contents of each
specific event for a wider audience.  (I assume that most of the
hundreds of sessions at ALA are of interest to more than just those who
happen to be in the room.) However, all the projects that are being
discussed during this particular session have probably been described in
other venues and more formal papers ...  It is really not reasonable to
expect that everything of interest be formally or informally (say, on a
discussion on the Internet) published.
 
[A small explanation and apologia from a member of the above ALA
Committee --   Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries]
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Feb 1994 15:34:34 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Entrepreneurial Computing
In-Reply-To:  <9402021457.AA02523@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM>
 
 
I run a one-person operation, publishing a newsletter and running
a consulting operation and professional association.  It's a
full-time job, and I have to charge accordingly.
 
Some people consider my services a bargain, some don't.  They
pay or don't pay accordingly.  And sometimes the ones who don't
pay are offended that I don't give my services for free, "in
the spirit of the Internet."
 
There are two ways I could do that.  One is to seek institutional
support.  I could ask AAAI, ACM, etc., to sponsor me.  My newsletter
would then be free to members -- or, if the associations were
willing, to everyone -- but the members would still be paying
my salary.  (And, in fact, any salary that I might accept
would have to be several times what I am making now.)  Thus the
information would not be free, it's just that the costs would
be hidden.  Subscribers would only have to write one dues
check instead of two, but many would have to pay even if they
did not want to read my newsletter.
 
The other way is that I could ask for volunteers to do the
work.  I could get people to act as reporters -- as, in fact,
I do now -- and others to act as editors.  Other people
could handle the membership list.  Bookkeeping would be
eliminated, as there would be no dues.  I could act as
editor in chief, and as the publisher handling the recruiting
and cajoling of all these people.  All of us would need other
jobs, of course.  And either we would have individual
support from our institutions or we would be paying for
the operation out of our own pockets.  In return, we would
get to feel good about our pro bono contribution and we
would probably benefit professionally in some small degree.
 
All three models work.  All three should be permitted.
For my own case, the key point is that I prefer the
capitalist (or first) model and am willing to do the
work.  I would not have the same motivation if I were
working as an employee of some other association, and
I don't consider the charging mechanism to be very fair.
(Democratic, perhaps, but not as fair.)  The third
option is not open to me unless I have some other job,
and managing a team is not as attractive to me as doing
the work myself.
 
In short, I'll sell my services but I won't sell out
to "the system."  If services are provided under a
corporate model, individuals are hired or persuaded
to volunteer for very narrow job functions that almost
anyone could do.  Too often, the result is a mediocre
"me too" product, such as the typical ACM SIG newsletter.
True professionalism requires more than volunteer labor,
so costs are higher and the willing customer base may
be smaller.  I prefer an entrepreneurial model, which
works for me and my customers, but doesn't lend itself
to corporate hiring and management policies.
 
Our society, especially in the US and in academia
worldwide, has evolved a corporate or bureaucratic
mindset.  We expect to plan a publication, do a
marketing study, advertise in the usual places,
and hire staff to fulfill the subscriptions.  Finding
"sparkplugs" to do the work is not considered a major
challenge.  It's a comfortable, efficient system,
and serves scholars reasonably well.  (They do
complain, though, and every small group wants its own
journal even though costs are prohibitive.)
 
I have no beef with bureaucratic publishing, but
I prefer to champion individual effort and a direct
service relationship with customers.  I serve the
needs of readers, not of writers.  Quality is often
uneven, but useful content is high.  Besides, there
is a "spark" to it that you won't find in traditional
publishing.  Free Internet services often do have
the spark, but not the professional quality.
 
I realize that VPIEJ-L is dedicated to scholarly
publishing, and Stevan Harnad and others are not
impressed by the type of material that I publish.
Follow your own dream.  But if your interest is in
the future of profitable publishing, look for ways
that you can harness entrepreneurial energy.  Find
people willing to burn themselves out, then pay
them accordingly (and support them in ways that
prevent burnout).  Dedicated and talented people
should be the core of a publication, not an afterthought.
 
                                        -- Ken Laws
 
 
Dr. Kenneth I. Laws; (415) 493-7390; laws@ai.sri.com.
Ask about my weekly AI/IS/CS online news service.
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Feb 1994 15:46:53 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Mike O'Donnell 
Subject:      Audible presentation of text
 
 
When a document is published online in a digital form, the choice of
*internal* digital format is crucial. The range of possible formats is
wide, but divides roughly into two broad classes:
 
(1) descriptions of printed pages (e.g. bitmaps, PostScript)
 
(2) descriptions of the logical structure of the text (e.g. SGML, LaTeX)
 
Structural formats translate relatively easily and automatically into
page formats, while the reverse translation is practically infeasible.
The strongest argument in favor of structural formats is that we
cannot anticipate all of the uses that will be made of a text in the
future. Structural formats present the essential information in a text
in the most general, flexible, and direct way that we are able to
accomplish at present. So, they have the greater potential to support
the wider range of future applications.
 
I have argued this point generally in a paper (available on request),
but I believe that the dissertation abstract below touches the case in
a concrete way that is even more telling. Imagine trying to provide
the audible presentation of a text described below from PostScript
(completely impractical) or from a bitmapped page image (practically
impossible).
 
Mike O'Donnell
The University of Chicago
Department of Computer Science
odonnell@cs.uchicago.edu
 
------- Forwarded Message
 
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 1994 08:26:07 -0500
From: T V Raman 
Subject: Audio System for Technical Readings:
Sender: SOUND@ACM.ORG
To: stevep@snowhite.cis.uoguelph.ca (Steve Portigal), sound@PASCAL.ACM.ORG
Cc: raman@cs.cornell.edu
Errors-To: scaletti@cerl.uiuc.edu
Warnings-To: scaletti@cerl.uiuc.edu
Message-Id: <9402021326.AA24529@freyr.cs.cornell.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7BIT
References: <9402020227.AA07318@snowhite.cis.uoguelph.ca>
 
 
 
You can now access an online copy of my PhD thesis entitled
Audio System for Technical Readings
 
from ftp.cs.cornell.edu under /pub/raman/phd-thesis.
 
You can currently find the dvi and ps files there.
 
(Steve, how did you produce the html for your thesis?  Did you use
LaTeX2HTML?)
 
 
 Thanks,
 --Raman
 
Appended below is the abstract of my thesis.
 
Topic: Audio System for Technical Readings
Time: 13:15
Date: 17 January, 1994
Place: 5130 Upson
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                               Abstract
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
The  advent of electronic documents makes  information  available in
more than  its visual form ---electronic information can  now  be
display-independent.
We  describe  a computing system, AsTeR, that
{\em audio formats\/}  electronic documents  to produce
audio documents.
AsTeR  can speak
 both literary texts and highly technical documents
(presently in La)TeX) that contain  complex mathematics.
 
Visual communication is characterized by the eye's ability to actively
access parts of a two-dimensional  display.  The reader is active, while the
display   is passive.  This active-passive role is reversed by
the temporal nature of oral communication:  information flows
actively past a passive listener.  This prohibits multiple views
----it is impossible to first obtain a high-level view and then
``look'' at  details.  These shortcomings
become  severe when presenting complex mathematics orally.
 
Audio formatting, which  renders information structure
in a manner attuned to an auditory display, overcomes these
problems.  AsTeR is  interactive, and  the ability to browse
information structure and obtain multiple views enables
{\em active\/} listening.
 
---Raman
 
------- End of Forwarded Message
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Feb 1994 15:50:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "EDWARD M. (TED) JENNINGS" 
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
 
About the library/ press/ garret publishing discussion, and its commercial
vs. non-profit (or academic scholarship vs. trade) parallel  --  I haven't
seen the question of "ownership" implicated in the positions taken.  Who
will "spend" time to do all the chores, from scholarly assessment to copy-
editing and formatting, unless there is a source of income?  Can income be
derived from a product that is not "owned" --i.e., copyrighted-- by the
publisher?  Another phrasing: who would pay for text/ material that is being
given away?  I am in favor of giving away academic scholarship, but I think
electronic publication --as the current discussion suggests-- is going to
falter (albeit not disappear) unless the "subsidy" issue and its counterpart
issue, "ownership," are acknowledged, addressed and overtly settled --
Ted Jennings
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Feb 1994 06:01:16 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
In-Reply-To:  <199402042112.AA08110@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "EDWARD M." at
              Feb 4, 94 03:50:05 pm
 
>
> About the library/ press/ garret publishing discussion, and its commercial
> vs. non-profit (or academic scholarship vs. trade) parallel  --  I haven't
> seen the question of "ownership" implicated in the positions taken.  Who
> will "spend" time to do all the chores, from scholarly assessment to copy-
> editing and formatting, unless there is a source of income?
 
So far as I know, scholarly assessment is done for free by peers. I have
never been paid for the articles I was asked to review for any scholarly
journal. My point, all along, is that a vast majority of scholarly journals
exist because they are openly or implicitly subsidized. Generally, both
processes go on at the same time. My further point is that the added
income derived from the sale of subscriptions often corresponds to
printing costs, distribution costs and subsciption maintenance. Sometimes,
money is even wasted on publicity as if knowledge had to be propped up
by such strange practices. My argument to granting agency -- one I owe
to Wlad Godzich, to be totally fair in this matter -- is that, dollar
for dollar, they get more for their investment with an electronic journal
than with a print journal. Getting more for the money means diffusing
as good material in greater quantity to more people that are more widely
spread across the planet.
 
Scholarly journals are labors of love and, thanks to electronics, we,
academics, are recovering the possibility of doing this work ourselves,
as we want, from within the universities.
 
 
  Can income be
> derived from a product that is not "owned" --i.e., copyrighted-- by the
> publisher?  Another phrasing: who would pay for text/ material that is being
> given away?
 
The point is to get out of the commodity framework, once again. Authors
in the scholarly world do not get paid for their material, at least not
directly. They gain visibility, promotion and sometimes even fame with
thei publications, but they are very rarely paid for their texts. In some
disciplines, presently, authors must pay to get printed!
 
  I am in favor of giving away academic scholarship, but I think
> electronic publication --as the current discussion suggests-- is going to
> falter (albeit not disappear) unless the "subsidy" issue and its counterpart
> issue, "ownership," are acknowledged, addressed and overtly settled --
 
Indeed, and we are doing a lot of work in several countries, to try and educate
various granting agencies in this regard. I should say that they have been
listening very well, at least here in Quebec and in Canada. They are cautious
and move deliberately but they are not hostile in the least, far from it.
I suspect the same is true of most granting agencies in most countries where
the phenomenon is spreading.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Feb 1994 06:09:02 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JMUCKERHEIDE@delphi.com
Subject:      Re: Scholarly Communications Updates
 
Thank you, Ann. Your explanation helps considerably.
 
Can we look forward to any raporteur communications available to the net as
is often done for the conference participants who are obviously unable also
to attend simultaneous sessions.
 
Thanks again,
 
Jim Muckerheide
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Feb 1994 08:13:33 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Donnice Cochenour 
Subject:      Survey of Gopher access to e-journals
 
 
A few weeks ago I posted a 5-question survey to this list requesting that
those who use Gopher to provide access to electronic journals respond.  This
precipitated a very interesting discussion on the part of several editors and
other involved in the creation of electronic journals, but provided little
information about how these are being handled by libraries.  I received 10
responses from people responsible for Gopher access to electronic
publications.  I'd like to ask once more for a response from others about how
they are handling electronic journals in their libraries -- the original
posting follows.
****************************************************************************
 
PLEASE disregard this message if you are not using GOPHER to store and access
electronic journals --
 
I am interested in determining how libraries who use the GOPHER software are
choosing to make electronic journals available to their patrons.  My primary
question is whether the local library is downloading the files to a local
computer or if they are only using GOPHER to point to another remote archive
for these files.  If you could take a few minutes to answer the following
5 questions, I would appreciate your assistance.
 
[Note: these questions have been cross-posted to VPIEJ-L and SERIALST.]
 
************************************************************************
 
1) How many electronic journal titles (menu choices) do you have on your
GOPHER server?
 
        # of titles/menu choices ______
 
2) How many electronic journal titles do you have stored on your local
(institution or library) computer?
 
        # of titles stored locally ______
 
3) What is the name of your institution?
 
 
4) Please give the address and menu path to your electronic journals on
your GOPHER server.
 
 
 
5) If I have other questions about your GOPHER server and electronic
journals, who can I contact?
 
 
 
Please send responses directly to me rather than the list.  I will summarize
for the list if there is sufficient interest in the question.  Thank you for
your time.
 
***************************************************************************
Donnice Cochenour                                    (303) 491-1821 (voice)
Serials Librarian                                      (303) 491-1195 (fax)
Colorado State University Libraries
Ft.Collins, CO  80523              Internet: dcochenour@vines.colostate.edu
***************************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Feb 1994 08:08:21 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         John Merritt Unsworth 
Subject:      PMC by WWW
 
I'm pleased to announce that Postmodern Culture is now available in a
hypermedia edition via the World-Wide Web.  All back issues and the
current, January 1994, issue can be found at:
 
http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/pmc/contents.all.html
 
Gopher distribution of the journal is now available at
jefferson.village.virginia.edu as well.  Listserv and ftp sites remain
pmc-list@listserv.ncsu.edu and ftp.ncsu.edu, respectively.
 
John Unsworth
Co-Editor, PMC
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Feb 1994 08:35:14 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Lucia Ruedenberg 
Subject:      announcing - TDR: the journal of performance studies
 
  __________________________________________________________________
   ...You may have never heard us, yet you may be interested in...
  __________________________________________________________________
    ________________      _____________          _____________
   /_______________/|    /____________ \        /____________ \
   |||||||||||||||||/    |||||||||||||\ \       |||||||||||||\ \
          |||| |         |||| |     |||\ \      |||| |     |||\ \
          |||| |         |||| |      |||\ \     |||| |______||||/
          |||| |         |||| |       |||| |    ||||/______||||/
          |||| |         |||| |       ||||/     |||||||||||||\ \
          |||| |         |||| |______||||/      |||| |    ||||\ \
          |||| |         ||||/______||||/       |||| |     ||||\ \
          ||||/          ||||||||||||||/        ||||/       ||||\/
  __________________________________________________________________
  The Journal of Performance Studies  T140 (Winter 1993)
 
  TDR is a journal that explores the diverse world of performance.
  How does this relate to you? It emphasizes the intercultural, inter-
  disciplinary and spans numerous geographical areas and historical
  periods. TDR addresses performance issues of every kind: theatre,
  dance, entertainment, media, sports, politics, aesthetics of everyday
  life, games, play, and ritual. TDR is for people in the performing
  arts, the social sciences, academics, activists and theorists--anyone
  interested thinking about the "performance" paradigm. The journal, is
  edited by Richard Schechner of the Department of Performance Studies,
  New York University, and is published quarterly by MIT Press.
 
  Now, TDR has joined the Internet community!
 
  The TDR_FORUM: on the discussion list Perform-L, you can participate in a
  forum that will focus on the latest issue, with both contributing authors
  and fellow readers. See instructions below.
 
  You can browse through sample articles on the Electronic Newsstand. You
  subscribe through MIT or the Electronic Newsstand. See directions below.
 
  Check out our table of contents:
  ---------------------------------------------------------------------
  // In this issue (T140 - Winter 1993) \\
  ----------------------------------------
  - Towards the 21st Century - a TDR Comment by Richard Schechner (editor)
  - Performing the Texts of Virtual Reality and Interactive  Fiction -
      by J. Yellowlees Douglas
  - Magister Macintosh: Shuffled Notes on Hypertext Writing - by Richard Gess
  - The Word Becomes You: interview with Anna Deavere Smith - by Carol Martin
  - Anna Deavere Smith: Acting as Incorporation - by Richard Schechner
  - Shapiro and Shaliko: Techniques of Testimony - by Richard Kramer
  - Shaliko in Pictures, Shapiro in Words - by Leonardo Shapiro
  - Leaving Town Up and Down - by Leonardo Shapiro
  - Babilonia in Buenos Aires: An Interview with Javier Grosman - by
     Elzbieta Szoka
  - Operation Mallfinger: Invisible Theatre in a Popular Context - by
      Jonathan M. Gray
  - Casting the Audience - By Natalie Crohn Schmitt
  - Happenings in Europe in the '60s - by Gunter Berghaus
  - Book review essays by Richard Trousdell, Edith Turner, and David J. DeRose
 
  Each TDR issue is provocative in content, with photographs, artwork, and
  scripts illustrating every article. The journal, founded in 1955, is
  7 x 10, and 184 pages per issue.
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  // Join our electronic TDR_Forum on Perform-L \\
  ------------------------------------------------
     We invite you to join us in a discussion of the latest issue of TDR,
     featuring an article by Richard Gess - "Magister Macintosh: Shuffled
     Notes on Hypertext Writing."
 
     To subscribe to perform-l:
       send e-mail to: mailserv@acfcluster.nyu.edu
       leave the subject
       put only one line in the letter: sub perform-l yourrealname
 
     To get Gess's article via anonymous ftp:
       ftp acfcluster.nyu.edu
       cd perform
       get tdrgess.txt
       quit
 
     To get Gess's article via e-mail:
       send email to: mailserv@acfcluster.nyu.edu
       leave subject blank
       put only one line in the letter: send [anonymous.perform]tdrgess.txt
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  // Come browse and subscribe \\
  -------------------------------
  1. The Electronic Newsstand
      You can browse through an article from our latest issue and obtain
      subscription information on the Electronic Newsstand. On Gopher,
      go to: massachusetts/MIT/Interesting Sites to Explore/Electronic
 
      To subscribe to TDR through the Electronic Newsstand, send your name
      and address to: the_drama_review@enews.com. Or call: 1-800-40-ENEWS.
 
  2. MIT Press Online
      You can explore the MIT Press Online Catalogue and obtain subscription
      information: telnet techinfo.mit.edu. Choose: Around MIT/MIT press/
      journals/arts/. Through Gopher go to: USA?massachusetts/MIT.
 
      To subscribe to TDR send e-mail to: journals-orders@mit.edu
 
      MIT Press Journals, 55 Hayward Street, Cambridge, MA 02142-1399 USA
      Tel: (617) 253-2889   Fax: (617) 258-6779
  ------------------------------------------------------end of msg---------
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Feb 1994 17:12:45 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ian Pitchford 
Subject:      Psychiatry
 
######################################################################
 ANNOUNCING A NEW UNMODERATED DISCUSSION FORUM DEALING WITH ISSUES IN
                  PSYCHIATRY AND ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
######################################################################
                       -------------------------
                       Psychiatry@mailbase.ac.uk
                       -------------------------
*TO SUBSCRIBE:
 
    SEND THE MESSAGE "SUBSCRIBE PSYCHIATRY  "
    (IN THE BODY OF THE MESSAGE) TO: MAILBASE@MAILBASE.AC.UK
 
*TO SEND A MESSAGE TO THE LIST:
 
    SEND THE MESSAGE TO PSYCHIATRY@MAILBASE.AC.UK
 
This mailbase list has been set up with the aim of utilising the vast
resources of the Internet on behalf of everyone interested in issues
in psychiatry and abnormal psychology. As with any discussion forum
its value will be proportional to the effort that those contributing
to it are prepared to make in provoking stimulating and thoughtful
debate.
 
The forum was judged to be necessary because many of the findings
and viewpoints in the fields of psychiatry and abnormal psychology
are both controversial and easily misinterpreted, resulting in a lack
of empathy and understanding between those pursuing radically
different approaches to the aetiology and pathophysiology of mental
illness. It is hoped that the forum will act as a bridge between
those taking a biomedical viewpoint of the study and treatment of
psychopathology, and those taking a more existential or psychodynamic
viewpoint.
 
It is hoped in particular that amicable discussion will encourage and
support an attitude of mutual respect, producing a more collaborative
approach to these difficult issues, so narrowing the unacceptably
wide gulf that now separates the opposing camps.
 
All of those wishing to share personal insights, research findings,
philosophical outlooks, clinical case notes, or simple anecdotes on
any of the following, are cordially invited to contribute:
 
* Methodology: clinical case histories, scientific experimentation,
  laboratory models, statistical and analytical methods, meta-
  analysis.
 
* Current and past research papers, unpublished findings.
 
* Epidemiology of mental illness.
 
* Concepts of abnormality: The underlying philosophy of psychiatry
  and abnormal psychology.
 
* The history of perceived causes of abnormal behaviour: possession
  and witchcraft, physical causes, psychogenic causes.
 
* The real life experience of mental illness.
 
* Conflicting Approaches? The Biomedical approach, the psychodynamic
  approach, the environmental model: behavioural and cognitive
  approaches
 
* Psychiatric Nomenclature
 
* Psychometric Testing - Psychological classification and assessment.
 
* Specific Disorders: Personality disorders, neuroses, paranoid
  states, affective disorders, schizophrenia, organic disorders,
  eating disorders, sexual dysfunction and abnormality, psychoactive
  substance abuse, psychosomatic illness, behavioural disorders in
  children.
 
* Diagnosis, classification, symptomatology, and prognosis of mental
  illness.
 
* Psychoneuroimmunology, psychoneuroendocrinology.
 
* Disorders of the nervous system and psychopathology.
 
* Psychiatric emergencies.
 
* Psycotherapeutic techniques.
 
* Alternative approaches: meditation, relaxation, etc.
 
* Physical treatments: psychopharmacology, electro-convulsive therapy,
  aversion therapy, psychoneurosurgery, etc.
 
* Mental illness and the legal system: uses and abuses of psychiatry.
 
* Mental illness and society: community care, the history of mental
  health care, the public perception of the mentally ill.
 
* Psychopathology and creativity.
 
* Aetiology: genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology.
 
* Reviews of new publications, journal articles, conferences. Have
  you read a stimulating reappraisal, or cogent exposition of your
  speciality? If so, let us know.
 
* Assessment of contributors to the development of psychology and
  psychiatry: Charcot, Freud, Jung, Adler, Bleuler, Kraepelin, Meyer
  Erikson, Fromm, Rogers, Perls, Frankl, Skinner, Ellis, Laing et al.
 
The basic underlying philosophy of this forum is: "There is someone
wiser than any of us, and that is all of us." This would also be an
appropriate motto for the Internet, and I would be very happy to hear
from anyone who would like to assist in the compilation of a resource
guide, register of research interests, or any other such extension to
the services offered by this list that would be productive in making
it a more useful tool to the subscribers.
______________________________________________________________________
 
###########################################
All comments and suggestions to:
Ian Pitchford 
###########################################
**********************************************************************
*  Ian Pitchford                     *   I.Pitchford@Sheffield.ac.uk *
*  Department of Biomedical Science  *   University of Sheffield     *
**********************************************************************
* "If the human race survives, future men will, I suspect, look back *
*  on our enlightened epoch as a veritable Age of Darkness."         *
*                                      R.D.Laing, 1967.              *
**********************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 18 Feb 1994 08:23:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Subject:      *ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY*
 
 
*ELECTRONIC ANTQUITY*
 
After its summer break *EA* returns and Volume 1 Issue 7 will be published
later this month.  The editors welcome contributions for this and for
future issues (all articles will be refereed, however a section -
*Positions* - will exist for those wishing to take a more controversial
stance on things), which may be sent to:
 
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
 
The editors also wish to announce *DIDASKALIA: ANCIENT THEATER TODAY*,
Volume 1 Issue 1 of which will be published in March (see below).
Contributions may be sent to:
 
didaskalia-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
 
 
*DIDASKALIA: ANCIENT THEATER TODAY*
 
Sallie Goetsch (Founding Editor)
Oliver Taplin (Consultant)
Ian Worthington (Publisher and Contributing Editor)
Peter Toohey (Publisher and Contributing Editor)
ISSN 1321-4853
 
The ancient Athenians called their records of the performing arts (music,
dance, and theater) *didaskaliai*. Every year they would inscribe on stone
the victors in the contests of comedy, tragedy, dithyramb and other poetic
competitions.
 
The Athenians could afford to make all these records after the fact. They
knew when and where to go for drama, dance, and music, because of the
regular schedule of festivals in antiquity. We are not so fortunate today,
and one of the greatest difficulties to devotees of ancient theatre is
finding it.
 
Now we have our own *Didaskalia*  to inscribe modern productions and
adaptations of Greek and Roman performing arts not in stone but in
cyberspace.  Beginning in March of 1994 (and appearing every other month),
we will provide listings, previews, reviews, features, and resources
pertaining to ancient theatre and its modern incarnations.  It will be
distributed from the University of Tasmania, Australia, under the direction
of Ian Worthington, and may be accessed via ftp or gopher.  Distribution
will be exclusively electronic, in order to provide up-to-the-minute
accuracy and publicise productions in a  timely fashion.
 
We seek to encourage communication between professionals and amateurs,
between performers and public, between scholars and artists.  *Didaskalia*
will also provide a forum for the airing of complaints and the exchange of
opinions - and a source of answers to questions and solutions to practical
problems.  Our contributors and subscribers range from grade-school
students and their parents to professional opera singers. The collective
experience of our colleagues around the world creates a vast potential for
interdisciplinary dialogue and illumination and can only enhance the
quality of the already fascinating work being done on ancient theatre.
 
---------
Ian Worthington,
Department of Classics,
University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania 7001,
Australia.
Tel. (002) 202-294 (direct)
Fax (002) 202-288
e-mail:  Ian.Worthington@classics.utas.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 21 Feb 1994 08:42:35 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Circulation
 
I have been an electronic publisher for over 18 months now.  A question
which has repeatedly faced me is how to tabulate circulation.  In a
networked environment, it is almost impossible to track file
distribution, especially when you consider "file osmosis," which is the
means by which files get downloaded, then uploaded elsewhere.
 
When you sell advertising, potential advertisers want to know what your
readership is.  Since electronic files don't have a print run, you can't
say how many copies are "in circulation," you cannot tabulate returns,
and in fact, you can't even document distribution sites beyond the first
tier (ie. the sites you uploaded to directly).
 
This is not solely an Internet problem.  Fidonet-style networks are even
worse, and the sheer amount of file osmosis on tradition bulletin board
systems make it a nightmare.
 
The solution (if you can call it that) would be to restrict access to
a single site where you could tabulate downloads, but in a way, that's
shooting yourself in the foot.  By restricting circulation, you almost
guarantee that your readership will be smaller.
 
I don't know if there is a way out of the dilemma, but would like to hear
the thoughts of other for-profit e-publishers on the subject.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 21 Feb 1994 09:41:51 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "David L. Gants" 
Subject:      Re: Circulation
In-Reply-To:  <199402211350.AA34857@faraday.clas.Virginia.EDU> from "Digital
              Publisher" at Feb 21, 94 08:42:35 am
 
Todd Jacobs writes:
 
>> When you sell advertising, potential advertisers want to know what your
>> readership is.  Since electronic files don't have a print run, you can't
>> say how many copies are "in circulation," you cannot tabulate returns,
>> and in fact, you can't even document distribution sites beyond the first
>> tier (ie. the sites you uploaded to directly).
 
Perhaps a way to begin thinking about advertising in an electronic
environment is to throw away the print paradigm and all that it entails.
An electronic journal is text without document, i.e., without physicality,
and the means of reproduction rest in the hands of the consumer not the
producer.  Furthermore, advertisers can gain access to the Internet
distribution system (and have) through any number of commercial
services, and don't really need journals as mechanisms of distribution.
 
Since e-journal publishers can't sell space in a document, they are
bereft of the traditional advertising product.  What they retain,
however, is a mailing list.  A great deal of marketing revolves around
sending focused material to specific groups (and we all can instantly
recognise groups: yuppies, X-generation, WM 18-35, etc.)  I wonder
if Mr. Jacobs and others might not find this a profitable alternative
to traditional print advertising?  Many enterprises consider their
mailing lists prime assets, and a clever electronic publisher could
generate a number of highly specific lists.  Current users of the
Internet, swamped as they are with e-mail and news groups, will
view such developments as a digital Armageddon.  I don't believe
any mechanism exists to prevent it, though.
 
David L. Gants -- dlg8x@virginia.edu -- University of Virginia
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Feb 1994 08:40:13 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Jon Schull 
Subject:      circulation
 
Todd Jacobs writes...
 
>I have been an electronic publisher for over 18 months now.  A question
>which has repeatedly faced me is how to tabulate circulation.  In a
>networked environment, it is almost impossible to track file
>distribution, especially when you consider "file osmosis," which is the
>means by which files get downloaded, then uploaded elsewhere.
...
>I don't know if there is a way out of the dilemma, but would like to hear
>the thoughts of other for-profit e-publishers on the subject.
 
Our approach is to allow (and encourage copying), but require (and
reward) user-registration.  Use our freely-available Tools to
SoftLock some of your publication, such that a workstation-
specific password is required for full access.   Your readers can
get passwords anytime by dialing 1-800-SoftLock or (soon) by
sending Email to Passwords@SoftLock.com.  You don't even have to
charge the customer for the Password (although you'd have to pay
us a transaction fee).
 
Our ambition is to get our freely-available tools incorporated
into every document browser there is (developers inquire within),
but right now, the SoftLock DOS Document Toolkit gives any DOS
application transparent access to SoftLocked documents, and
allows you to SoftLock any document in seconds.  With it, you
could decrypt and read a SoftLocked passage like the following by
typing something like this...
 
>     SoftLock PASSWORD list DOCUMENT.txt
 
(from the DOS prompt, assuming you have the appropriate Password,
and are using a program like LIST.COM to view DOCUMENT.TXT).
 
=============================================================================
Jonathan Schull, Ph.D., President, SoftLock Services Inc. Schull@SoftLock.com
963 East Ave. #1, Rochester, NY 14607-2251           716-242-0348 (voice/fax)
=============================================================================
For info about SoftLock Services (400 lines)....Email  IntroLong@SoftLock.com
For info about SoftLock DOS Document Toolkit....Email   SLDocKit@SoftLock.com
============================================================================
 
===Encryption of SAMPLE SoftLock Product Number 00000 (XXXXXXXX) Begins ===

..1zxIjYA2ZBTOtSnyEC0z6u0FY3G7jxBgM8MSgYqLeLeifKZzr6n2TOv7GZoHXJwAx7nFao05
..IP9GhWfpZAKLryndxvMFBH5SQdRo4gvbWixLWWfGkndPvqvlLniEQCqikXYVvaoyUlVvk9EN
..QtvZm59/+vyVImbhMGDuD5+Ba/wCs8gXtJlRLerqR2W1o2kfpyQdgPXu/kL+3MUsA7/qOZcO
..EUeLV5PRDTx18/6pfsaO0gnS4t2+hxZmhJNehJ8NqNsHiUyCgBwHMM42SchJDu2skstEr1dY
..2JEjBKz0VX3ek7DPrt881vVNpUpAZxMJqOIL29mbn3/6/C9o5tCpFZHbBC4yf5Tv72EMDWYW
..oJv9VDfMpIwrLLTDRsNGBBOOj12xrPHAq2LJJ/55BbPPVlYmwTRMNBhsXEdxd/K+yfP2qY9j
..Yo/GZ3Thc549Ut4cBhFhVtzbTJ7s6/pGCKPYdylYKCBJNoDYjnwqknbfvq+qUjL9AboNzA3f
..rtnr+m45B7MXDAxyyEmBU8mWi0Wmo2e3hJ8Y+mw0G20kDYTbctefGOqVGZqzDJwDoRDDLas4
..EkSdy6bN8+HcET5VUiNXVuEHGuuzUdX9GoOVywMDHpChl69kArsUFCpn2fWu1veCGINsXeHh
..4KeI7ByCuZYxjPkq/5nBhb3pZLydb7WjDZG0362/8/Tg4rBqsIRWIjzkGPQbg2uKi1wsifB0
..LUnJopCRd28F2ffXPEjjNBtt2febTHLXn+vVGoNjpLiGo4UQwzerAkdAcAiiTlNP3L3Ch1IZ
..55TRnEKn7g9RfzhZDF/KK/9uc7y2PyrUQBILHbAkrtb3ghh52s/iVteGruT+6WpabBdA04iG
..l6W9Ny1HVabN3ZELr8mxh4d5YuZWDN8iYNnsHIGVuW0SyjC0OaWBENIlQLtQycDUz+P9G2r+
..Gmvc5yzgPPSFgiF/GovTMC8AZ3WJOfYlimITxnvhFRVPFq1SwlTPQuIXp9s8FuscahswzuiW
..6CCRvxDtcXkJztop0ue3Pb4+HGsYg2xdXuHF2+Qm9+kxQ4WdHv/KhcEVDjclvFWdo1jGC0+9
..fTx/lG+EW9963xagauz8+siyHl+mjZnDpTpEFGRpzpKSd0jsp/XuqAZwlGhWQg96heMYOvuk
..S1x8iaUz7Y1Hr8KLu2h23bQV9grW1ZO6aZRC1yRIhpkZ+hhUzDFyzvGrTr+sv0F5EVdhqN87
..eib07P0harLMK/nITaVKjTklihMJ0sZ7dPI9yX34Re9ohFYn1zxI4zQbbaSMMF9yxMMz6u01
..Y3G7j6OSd093UG95AADYAzxTb2Z0TG9ja2VkOigwOSkhPg==
TWOPART>SLB<<
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Feb 1994 08:42:38 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         William Ball 
Subject:      billing for e-publications
 
An idea of a model for billing readers of electronic publications ocurred
to me and I would like to run it by others in this group.
 
I see e-pubs as gravitating away from simple text and into forms which
require special software for reading. Of course several examples (TEX,
Postscript, SGML) have been around for some time and there are, more or
less, applications available to read the files. But a new wave of
software is appearing---Adobe Acrobat, Replica, etc.--which looks to gain
a lot of ground due to a more intense marketing effort.
 
Let's say, for the sake of argument, that Acrobat becomes massive popular.
E-journals and gophers distribute documents which require an Acrobat
reader. If I want a subscription to the journal or data I contact the
content publisher. The publisher provides me (perhaps electronically) with
a code that will allow me to read the publisher's documents using the
reader program for a specified period of time. I am charged a fee for the
code. I can purchase the reader software from whomever, however the
software has been changed so that it will only
display/print/search/whatever password protected documents when it has
the publisher's code.
 
This system provides income to the content publisher so that he/she can
produce documents. It allows the free distribution of documents--thus the
internet can be the distribution mechanism without having to be concerned
with limiting or billing access. Plain text indexes, abstracts, and other
useful information can co-exist on the net along with the password
protected documents. Lastly, The companies who produce
the publishing and reading software have an economic interest in building
password recognition capabilities into their software as well as
producing well liked and easy to use software. This system seems to me to
blend the free and open culture of the net with the need to recoup the
costs of content production.
 
Well?
 
Bill Ball
Ball@trenton.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Feb 1994 08:43:12 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Mark Steinberger 
Subject:      New Electronic Math Journal
 
 
              Journal Announcement and Call for Papers
 
     for a Full-Service, Refereed Electronic Mathematics Journal:
 
 
                THE NEW YORK JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICS
 
 
The New York Journal of Mathematics is a refereed mathematics journal
being launched by the University at Albany, State University of New
York.
 
The journal is broadly based in subject matter, covering algebra,
modern analysis, and geometry/topology.
 
The papers will be presented via the TeX mathematical typesetting
language, developed by Donald Knuth. TeX has become the standard for
computer typesetting of mathematical publications.
 
Access will be provided through a variety of electronic means,
including listserv, anonymous ftp and gopher. In particular, access
will be much more convenient than that provided by a conventional
print journal. Because papers will be published as they are accepted
by the editorial board, publication delays will be minimal.
 
The articles will be archived, date stamped, and maintained by the
University at Albany, State University of New York. The University
takes responsibility for insuring the integrity of the journal's
archive in perpetuity.
 
The journal will have an ISSN number and will be accessed by the major
bibliographic publications in the field.
 
The development of this journal is being underwritten by the Office of
Information Systems of the University at Albany, State University of
New York.
 
Appended below are the details for the submission of articles and for
access to the journal.
 
Sincerely,
 
Mark Steinberger, The University at Albany, State University of New York
Editor in Chief, New York Journal of Mathematics
mark@sarah.albany.edu
 
 
Editors:
 
Marc Culler, University of Illinois at Chicago
culler@math.uic.edu
ftp drop: /incoming/NYJ on math.uic.edu
 
Andrew Granville, University of Georgia
nyj@sophie.math.uga.edu
ftp drop: /nyj on sophie.math.uga.edu
 
Jonathan Lubin, Brown University
lubinj@gauss.math.brown.edu
ftp drop: /NYJ on gauss.math.brown.edu
 
Paul Muhly, University of Iowa
muhly@math.uiowa.edu
 
Bodo Pareigis, Universitaet Muenchen
Pareigis@rz.Mathematik.Uni-Muenchen.de
 
Andrew Ranicki, University of Edinburgh
a.ranicki@edinburgh.ac.uk
ftp drop: incoming/nyj on ftp.maths.ed.ac.uk
 
Douglas C. Ravenel, University of Rochester
drav@troi.cc.rochester.edu
 
Richard Rochberg, Washington University
rr@math.wustl.edu
 
Joseph Rosenblatt, Ohio State University
jrsnbltt@math.ohio-state.edu
 
David J. Saltman, University of Texas
saltman@math.utexas.edu
 
Birgit Speh, Cornell University
speh@math.cornell.edu
 
Ronald J. Stern, University of California at Irvine
rstern@math.uci.edu
ftp drop: /NYJ on math.uci.edu
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Instructions for Submission of Articles
 
 
Complete information for submission of articles is given in the
journal's gopher/ftp archive. We summarize that information here.
 
Papers should be submitted by electronic mail to the member of the
editorial board closest to your field. For the convenience of authors,
a guide to the areas considered by the individual editors has been
placed in the journal's archive.
 
The papers will be refereed in the traditional manner, with one
anonymous referee.
 
The specifications for our articles are described explicitly in
"Style specifications for electronic submissions to the New York
Journal of Mathematics," on file in the archive. Copies are also
available from the listserv.
 
Two of these specifications should be emphasized: We ask that authors
prepare their papers using the style files and the templates for front
matter provided by either the archive or the listserv. They are
designed to facilitate the editing process.
 
We currently have style specifications for submissions in amstex and
amslatex. We may add other flavors of tex at a later date.
 
We will permit the use of certain specified diagram packages and
techniques for the inclusion of graphics. Details will be provided in
the style specifications.
 
Authors will have an opportunity to make final corrections before
publication.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Access to the New York Journal of Mathematics
 
 
The New York Journal will be accessible by a combination of listserv
and gopher/ftp.
 
By listserv, we will distribute abstracts of the papers, together with
instructions for retrieving them via ftp and gopher.
 
The abstracts will be available on four separate listserv lists: one
will distribute abstracts for every paper. The other three are
specialty lists, giving abstracts for papers in algebra, analysis and
geometry/topology, respectively. The reader may, of course, subscribe
to any combination of these lists.
 
To subscribe, send a note to listserv@albnyvm1.bitnet:
 
    If you want to receive the abstracts for all the papers, the body
    of your note should read
 
           subscribe NYJMTH-A 
 
    For the specialized lists, the body of your note should read
 
        Algebra:
 
           subscribe NYJM-ALG 
 
        Analysis:
 
           subscribe NYJM-AN  
 
        Geometry/Topology:
 
           subscribe NYJM-TOP 
 
 
To avoid duplication, we will only be archiving the postings on
NYJMTH-A, the list carrying all the abstracts. The archive for
NYJMTH-A will also contain the style specifications for submissions
and the templates for frontmatter.
 
 
The gopher/ftp archive will contain both the abstract and a .dvi file
for each paper. Both abstract and .dvi will remain unchanged from the
official date of publication, as may be verified by checking the date
stamps.
 
The gopher archive may be accessed by typing "gopher nyjm.albany.edu".
It is also available under the "Academic Offerings, Departments and
Programs" selection of the main gopher menu of the State University of
New York at Albany.
 
The same archive will be accessible by anonymous ftp on the machine
ftp_nyjm.albany.edu in the directory /pub/nyjm. (This feature has not
yet been enabled.)
 
The reader must have access to a printer driver for TeX in order to
print out the .dvi files. Such a driver is present in most mathematics
departments. Math departments, libraries, and other institutional
subscribers are welcome to consult with the Editor in Chief.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Feb 1994 08:43:52 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Jason Snell 
Subject:      Re: Circulation
 
>I have been an electronic publisher for over 18 months now.  A question
>which has repeatedly faced me is how to tabulate circulation.  In a
>networked environment, it is almost impossible to track file
>distribution, especially when you consider "file osmosis," which is the
>means by which files get downloaded, then uploaded elsewhere.
>
>When you sell advertising, potential advertisers want to know what your
>readership is.
 
One way to get a decent idea, at least of your "first generation"
readership, is to ask all readers who aren't receiving your journal
directly from you via e-mail to register onto a "notification" list. The
people on this list will be notified via e-mail when a new issue appears on
FTP sites.
 
That way, they don't have to hunt to find it, and you have *some* idea
who's reading it.
 
-jason
 
--
    Jason Snell / jsnell@etext.org / Editor, InterText Magazine
 Assistant Editor, MacUser Magazine / UC Berkeley School of Journalism
"They deserved a free pizza along with life, liberty, and pursuit of
whatever -- it was fucking inalienable." -- Neal Stephenson, _Snow Crash_
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:21:42 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Gail Clement, FIU Reference" 
Subject:      Finding e-journals
 
I am wondering techniques are used to find known e-journal
titles when the common resources don't provide a listing.
 
I am looking for the whereabouts of the Journal of Reproductive
Toxicology and the electronic version of Chemical & Engineering
News.  Because they are, I suspect, paid-subscription journals,
they do not show up in CICnet, Strangelove's directory,
Archie searches... I also couldn't pull them from RLIN.
 
Does anyone have subscription information for these titles, or
suggestions about getting information on them?
 
Thanks for any assistance.
 
Gail Clement
Science/Information Services Librarian
Florida International University
clementg@servax.fiu.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:22:28 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "N.W.D Bowskill" 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
I don't know how much of this discussion I have missed
so I may well be covering old ground. That said, I have
been pondering in my quiet moments about how people might
get paid for publications etc. on the net.
 
Would it be possible to use the supermarket technique of
wiping a credit card but this time the user would do it
at their end and tap in the amount it was to be debited
and that would be to the publishers account ?
 
This would not overcome the problem of copying obviously, so
the true income potential would be diminished. Another possibility
is perhaps to have commissioned work by a list group and then what
they did with it would be up to them. The problem with this is that
you would either have to solicit such a commission or rely on someone
recognising one's hidden talents and inviting you, at great cost, to come
out into the limelight !
 
The only other option would be to use the net to inform people of one's
latest literary nugget and to have them, on that basis, obtain a copy
via mail order. The only problem with this might be the volume of
nuggets about which people would be informed !
 
If the discussion list has already solved this matter perhaps someone
would let me know of the final solution or, perhaps others may have
comments on the above.
 
Regards
 
Nicholas Bowskill
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:23:13 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         schull@cvs.rochester.edu
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <01H96I0WOCBK8WW7YP@ACC.HAVERFORD.EDU> from "William Ball" at Feb
              22, 94 08:42:38 am
 
 
 
You've described us to a "T".  I don't know why no-one has done it
before us, but we're doing it now.  Our tools are ready for incorporation
into anyone's program, and we our Password-sales system is available
to anyone anytime (dial 1-800-SoftLock).
 
For more info, Email IntroLong@SoftLock.com.
No subject.  You'll get a 400-line backgrounder.
Inquiries welcome.
 
Schull@SoftLock.com
 
>
> An idea of a model for billing readers of electronic publications ocurred
> to me and I would like to run it by others in this group.
>
> I see e-pubs as gravitating away from simple text and into forms which
> require special software for reading. Of course several examples (TEX,
> Postscript, SGML) have been around for some time and there are, more or
> less, applications available to read the files. But a new wave of
> software is appearing---Adobe Acrobat, Replica, etc.--which looks to gain
> a lot of ground due to a more intense marketing effort.
>
> Let's say, for the sake of argument, that Acrobat becomes massive popular.
> E-journals and gophers distribute documents which require an Acrobat
> reader. If I want a subscription to the journal or data I contact the
> content publisher. The publisher provides me (perhaps electronically) with
> a code that will allow me to read the publisher's documents using the
> reader program for a specified period of time. I am charged a fee for the
> code. I can purchase the reader software from whomever, however the
> software has been changed so that it will only
> display/print/search/whatever password protected documents when it has
> the publisher's code.
>
> This system provides income to the content publisher so that he/she can
> produce documents. It allows the free distribution of documents--thus the
> internet can be the distribution mechanism without having to be concerned
> with limiting or billing access. Plain text indexes, abstracts, and other
> useful information can co-exist on the net along with the password
> protected documents. Lastly, The companies who produce
> the publishing and reading software have an economic interest in building
> password recognition capabilities into their software as well as
> producing well liked and easy to use software. This system seems to me to
> blend the free and open culture of the net with the need to recoup the
> costs of content production.
>
> Well?
>
> Bill Ball
> Ball@trenton.edu
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:23:59 EST
Reply-To:     john@math.nwu.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         John Franks 
Organization: Dept of Math, Northwestern Univ
Subject:      Re: Circulation
 
In article <2k2dmt$itg@clarknet.clark.net>, tjacobs@clark.net (Digital
Publisher) writes:
> I have been an electronic publisher for over 18 months now.  A question
> which has repeatedly faced me is how to tabulate circulation.  In a
> networked environment, it is almost impossible to track file
> distribution, especially when you consider "file osmosis," which is the
> means by which files get downloaded, then uploaded elsewhere.
>
> When you sell advertising, potential advertisers want to know what your
> readership is.
 
It seems to me that electronic publishing makes tabulating circulation
easier and much more accurate than with paper publishing.  The publisher
provides articles with ads, or a catalog or whatever, via WWW to clients
using browsers like Mosaic.  (This seems to be the system nearly all
commercial electronic publishers are choosing, at least for now).
 
The server then counts exactly how many times each item has been
accessed.  The publisher can tell the advertiser exactly how many
times his ad has been viewed (well downloaded anyway).  If you want
to let other sites mirror your material you do so only on condition
they retain the ads and provide you with the access information.  It
is pretty trivial for them to do this.
 
Of course if an indvidual downloads an article and sends it to a friend
you will miss this. But that is true of paper publishing too.
 
--
 
John Franks     Dept of Math. Northwestern University
                john@math.nwu.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:24:41 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         andy2@violet.berkeley.edu
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <199402221343.FAA21281@violet.berkeley.edu>
 
William Ball wrote suggesting that a modification of Acrobat to
require publishers' passwords would permit us to publish on the
net freely, while charging anyone who actually wanted access to
our stuff.
 
The problem I see with the specific suggestion is that Acrobat
is an *exchange* program: the original files have to be formatted
in some readable way, whether that's Mac Word or SGML coding. Thus,
anyone with the source application can manipulate the published
documents at will.
 
I have been kicking around a version of Ball's idea: that we publish
SGML-coded documents and sell our readers translators that will format
the documents for their word processor (assuming that most academics,
anyway, are using or at least have access to one of the four or five
mainstream products).
 
I still believe that there's no immediate way to charge for publication
except by restricting access to the server, a la Compuserve. That means
no gophering, no fun, no great added value. If this whole ball of wax
is going to roll, we need to figure out another way to get back the
cost of that first copy, other than spreading it over all the copies used.
But's that's another extended conversation.
 
Jane-Ellen Long
University of California Press
andy2@violet.berkeley.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:25:28 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         ghermanp@kenyon.edu
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
Bill Balls' suggestion is a play on what OCLC is already doing with Current
Clinical Trials and other journals to come. The publisher creates the content,
OCLC provides the computer storage, reader software, and telecommunications
ports. The publisher sets the subscription rates and pays OCLC for the cost of
providing the journal.
 
Paul
Paul M. Gherman
Director of Libraries
Olin and Chalmers Library
Kenyon College
Gamibier, OH 43022
614-427-5186 voice
614-427-2272 fax
ghermanp@kenyon.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:26:19 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
The problem with your idea is that it doesn't take into account readert
apathy.  I think your plan would work very well for magazines with an
installed reader base (ie. scientific journals), but not for casual
interest magazines like literary or entertainment magazines.
 
For good or ill, we live in a cyberspace environment where "shareware"
has come to mean freeware, and pirated software has become overly
common.  Assuming for the moment that your software lock can't be cracked
(unlikely, since almost anything can be), you will have to compete for
attention with the freeware, unlocked journals.
 
Since they just have to be downloaded, instead of downloaded and
unlocked, the freeware journals will be chosen over the locked versions,
especially if there's money involved.
 
Money is important.  Will the reader get the key by calling an 800
number?  Or can he send a request to an email robot, and get instant
registration?  If neither happens (ie. he has to call long-distance or
wait for x days for his key), he is likely to lose interest in the interim.
 
My arguments could be set aside, since the Internet is an ideal medium
for instant registrations.  However, the Internet is not the sum total of
Cyberspace.  What about copies distributed on BBS systems, or by Fidonet-
or QWK-style networks?  Getting someone to download a "crippled" copy in
an environment where a one MB multimedia emag can take up to 2 hours is
NOT a good way to widen distribution.
 
I think your idea has a great deal of merit for scientific journals or
other emags aimed at a dedicated readership with discretionary funds.
The idea will fall flat if aimed at amateurs, computer neophytes, or
hobbyists.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:26:44 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Re: circulation
 
This SoftLock idea is interesting.  In response to anotheer article, I
expressed my belief that "crippled" journals will find readers to be less
receptive, and have difficulty attracting new readers.  However, your
project has some interesting possibilities.
 
What kinds of costs to the publisher are involved?  If they are
significant, then I doubt that the non-commercial or hobbyist publishers
will find it useful.  In point of fact, one of the main attractions of
e-publishing is the low overhead: no printing costs, no consumable
resources (ie. ink, paper), and no distribution costs.  If the publisher
has to pay for each unlocked copy, then it could become a financial
nightmare, and remove the low overhead benefit.
 
Should the publisher choose to pass the cost along to the reader, how
would he collect?  Credit cards?  Then he would loose the readership of
all those who don't have a credit card.  Bill by 900 numbers?  Those
numbers have an unsavory reputation, and might make the enterprise
unpopular.  Require pre-payment by check?  Then you loose the instant
gratification that is electronic publishing's main claim to fame.
 
The SoftLock program has merit for highly sought-after scientific
journals, but entertainment magazines would suffer.
 
---
 
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:27:10 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Re: Circulation
 
Jason Snell (jsnell@ocf.berkeley.edu) wrote:
: One way to get a decent idea, at least of your "first generation"
: readership, is to ask all readers who aren't receiving your journal
: directly from you via e-mail to register onto a "notification" list. The
: people on this list will be notified via e-mail when a new issue appears on
: FTP sites.
 
: That way, they don't have to hunt to find it, and you have *some* idea
: who's reading it.
 
This is an interesting idea.  I have tried something similar, though not
quite what you describe here.  I tried a survey, asking people what they
liked/disliked about the magazine.  In a full year of running the survey,
I got two -- only TWO -- responses.
 
I have become cynical, and see reader apathy as a force to be reckoned
with.  Your idea has a slightly different slant to it than my ill-fated
survey, and is definitely worth a shot.  I will spend some time
considering how to implement it within the magazine.
 
Thanks for your suggestion.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:27:38 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Michael Richardson 
Organization: Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
In article <2kdnj5$l3b@clarknet.clark.net> you write:
>The problem with your idea is that it doesn't take into account readert
>apathy.  I think your plan would work very well for magazines with an
>installed reader base (ie. scientific journals), but not for casual
  ...
>I think your idea has a great deal of merit for scientific journals or
>other emags aimed at a dedicated readership with discretionary funds.
>The idea will fall flat if aimed at amateurs, computer neophytes, or
>hobbyists.
 
  I think you are flat wrong wrt scientific journals being a good market.
  The people reading the journals (profs, graduate students,
undergraduates) are the people with the least spending authority at a
University. The departmental secretary typically has more spending
authority than professors in some departments!
 
  The price of the 'document' is going to have to be very low. Near $1.
At $1, it isn't worth the processing to support it. At $5-$10, most people
are going to wander over to the departmental magazine rack and pick up
paper, spend another ten minutes with gopher/www and find another
journal, etc.
  The only people who are likely to spend the money are those that
have specific references they are trying to look up. This is usually
related to some ongoing research. Having looked up the reference in a
paper library, the typical reaction is to photocopy it. Why? Finding
the volume in the library took work, the volume can't go home with
you, or into a file of 'background' stuff.
  If the article is electronic, the reaction is going to be "save to file".
  Gopher/WWW let one drop the reference in a bookmark file, but if it
was a particularly relevant piece of research, I would save it as well.
  Many will still fire it off on a printer.
 
  Recording passwords to access it again is just a hassle. I'm going
to save it decoded, and if someone else asks to see it, they are going
to get the decoded version.
 
--
 :!mcr!:             HOME: mcr@sandelman.ocunix.on.ca  +1 613 788 2600 3853
 Michael Richardson  WORK: mcr@ccs.carleton.ca         (Conservation Ecology)
Here is an HT
ML reference to my bio.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:28:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Subject:      *ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY* 1,7
 
As a subscriber to *Electronic Antiquity* you are now being contacted to
let you know that this month's issue (Volume 1 Issue 7) is now available.
A list of contents and access instructions follow.
 
*ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY:
COMMUNICATING THE CLASSICS*
 
ISSN 1320-3606
 
Peter Toohey (Founding Editor)
Ian Worthington (Editor)
 
VOL. 1 ISSUE 7 - FEBRUARY 1994
 
(01) LIST OF CONTENTS
 
(02) ARTICLES
 
Clay, Jenny Strauss, 'The Plot of the *Lysistrata* and the Hostages
        of Line 244'
Kelly, Douglas H., 'Athenian Popular Ideology'
 
(03) REVIEWS
 
Goetsch, Sallie R., 'Hunting for Ghosts'
Pitcher, Roger, '*Medea* (Sydney opera, based on Seneca)'
 
(04) J. PAUL GETTY MUSEUM by Kenneth Hamma
 
Recent Acquisitions
 
(05) KEEPING IN TOUCH
 
Conference:
Duty, Interest and Practical Reason,
        University of Pittsburgh (announcement)
 
Conference:
Methodos. Conference on Ancient Scientific and Philosophical
        Method,
        Amherst College (programme)
 
Conference:
Onstage Offstage: Self-Presentation by Body and Voice in
        Classical Athens,
        Yale University (programme)
 
Conference:
Still Stealing Fire: The Appropriation of
Classical Authority in the 18th Century,
        Penn State University (call for papers)
 
Conference:
Voice Into Text: Orality and Literacy in Ancient Greece
        University of Tasmania (announcement and papers)
 
Electronic Forums & Repositories for the Classics
        by Ian Worthington
 
(06) EMPLOYMENT
 
AUSTRALIA:
Chair of Ancient History, Macquarie University
 
(07) GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS
 
*Electronic Antiquity* Vol. 1 Issue 7 - February 1994
edited by Peter Toohey and Ian Worthington
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
ISSN 1320-3606
------------------------
 
A general announcement (aimed at non-subscribers) that
the journal is available will be made in approximately 12
hours time over the lists - as a subscriber you will be
automatically contacted in advance when future issues
are available.
 
Volume 1 Issue 8 will be published in March 1994.
 
The editors welcome contributions (all articles will be refereed,
however a section - *Positions* - will exist for those wishing
to take a more controversial stance on things).
 
HOW TO ACCESS
 
Access is via gopher or ftp.
The journal file name of this issue is 1,7-February1994;
Volume 1 Issues 1-6 may also be accessed in the same way.
 
GOPHER:
 
-- info.utas.edu.au and through gopher:
-- open top level document called Publications
-- open Electronic Antiquity.
-- open 1,7-February1994
-- open (01)contents first for list of contents, then other files as appropriate
 
FTP:
 
-- FTP.utas.edu.au (or ftp.info.utas.edu.au)
        --> departments --> classics --> antiquity.
-- In Antiquity you will see the files as described above.
 
Since a few people had problems accessing the journal via ftp,
here are the stages in more detail:
 
at your system prompt: FTP
at the subsequent prompt: open FTP.utas.edu.au
at login prompt: anonymous
at password: your username (which won't show)
then: cd departments
then: cd classics
then: cd antiquity
then: ls -l
then: cd 1,7-February1994
then: ls -l
   You will now have a list of the various directories (the 'd'
   beginning each line 'drwx....' indicates you're dealing with
   a directory)
then: cd (into whichever directory you want)
then: ls -l
   If the first character in the line is not 'd', you've got a file.
   Use the 'get' command plus the file name to download.  If you're
   still in a directory, use the 'ls-l' command to list its contents.
        Use 'get' to transfer files.
 
To move back up the directory tree:
 
type: cdup
then: ls -l
 
And repeat the process.
 
If still having trouble, try, once you have the directory list for
the journal:
 
Type (for example)       cd (01)Contents
Your response should be 'CWD command successful', but no list.
Type                     ls-l
Your response should be in a form such as:
-rw-rw-r--1  1689  77030  DATE  TIME contents
Type  get contents
and you should have a copy.
 
A final alternative if a space is magically inserted in the parenthesis
of the file number is to specify:
 
CD ./(01)Contents
 
Please also be very careful when ftping *not* to leave *any* spaces
in file names or make typos.
 
Do NOT use Telnet.
 
The best way to access the journal (in terms of both ease and
time) is by gopher, and we would urge you to do so.  The
structure of the journal is also more easily recognisable on gopher.
 
Please try to access *here* in Tasmania  either during the night,
very early morning or at weekends, since during the business
day the lines are crammed.  This means you'll need to check
with (e.g.) the international operator for the right time difference.
 
Queries and contributions may be directed to the editors at:
 
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
 
Peter Toohey (ptoohey@metz.une.edu.au)
Ian Worthington (ian.worthington@classics.utas.edu.au)
 
(end)
---------
Ian Worthington,
Department of Classics,
University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania 7001,
Australia.
Tel. (002) 202-294 (direct)
Fax (002) 202-288
e-mail:  Ian.Worthington@classics.utas.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 08:28:36 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
Michael Richardson (mcr@spiff.carleton.ca) wrote:
:   The price of the 'document' is going to have to be very low. Near $1.
: At $1, it isn't worth the processing to support it. At $5-$10, most people
: are going to wander over to the departmental magazine rack and pick up
: paper, spend another ten minutes with gopher/www and find another
: journal, etc.
 
Exactly.  That's why I've long espoused ad-supported electronic
publishing, rather than traditional subscription-based publishing.  If
the prices aren't lower than hardcopy magazines -- or even free -- people
will stick with the "tried-and-true" hardcopy magazines.
 
:   If the article is electronic, the reaction is going to be "save to file".
:   Gopher/WWW let one drop the reference in a bookmark file, but if it
: was a particularly relevant piece of research, I would save it as well.
:   Many will still fire it off on a printer.
:   Recording passwords to access it again is just a hassle. I'm going
: to save it decoded, and if someone else asks to see it, they are going
: to get the decoded version.
 
Again, you've hit the nail on the head.  It won't be dedicated pirates
who defeat software based locking devices, it'll be average people who
just want the content, and not the hassle.
 
Which brings us back to the original question: If you don't charge the
end user, how do you measure readership accurately?
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 13:13:45 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Georg Fuellen 
Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
In article , William Ball
 writes:
 
|> Let's say, for the sake of argument, that Acrobat becomes massive popular.
|> E-journals and gophers distribute documents which require an Acrobat
|> reader. If I want a subscription to the journal or data I contact the
|> content publisher. The publisher provides me (perhaps electronically) with
|> a code that will allow me to read the publisher's documents using the
|> reader program for a specified period of time. I am charged a fee for the
|> code. I can purchase the reader software from whomever, however the
|> software has been changed so that it will only
|> display/print/search/whatever password protected documents when it has
|> the publisher's code.
|>
|> This system provides income to the content publisher so that he/she can
|> produce documents. It allows the free distribution of documents--thus the
|> internet can be the distribution mechanism without having to be concerned
|> with limiting or billing access. Plain text indexes, abstracts, and other
|> useful information can co-exist on the net along with the password
|> protected documents. Lastly, The companies who produce
|> the publishing and reading software have an economic interest in building
|> password recognition capabilities into their software as well as
|> producing well liked and easy to use software. This system seems to me to
|> blend the free and open culture of the net with the need to recoup the
|> costs of content production.
 
just replace "Acrobat reader" by "Mosaic w/ user validation",
and you seem to propose something similar to a commercial "seal";
see the comp.infosystems.interpedia faq.
 
  georg
fuellen@mit.edu
The convex hull of all disclaimers made on usenet last year applies to this
mess
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 13:14:19 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         William Ball 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <9402231359.AB09089@tsclion.trenton.edu>
 
On Wed, 23 Feb 1994, Digital Publisher wrote:
 
> I think your idea has a great deal of merit for scientific journals or
> other emags aimed at a dedicated readership with discretionary funds.
> The idea will fall flat if aimed at amateurs, computer neophytes, or
> hobbyists.
>
> --
> Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
> Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
> Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
>
 
Scientific journals and data are exactly the type of publications I had
in mind. This could be an efficient and cost effective process if I bought
a _subscription_  to a year or whatever instead of paying by the
piece--just like with journals and magazines now.
 
An idea like this has to be better compared to its rival--subscription to
paper journals which I have to go over to the library, track down, and
maybe find on the shelf. I would find it vastly more conveinent to search
and browse abstracts from my office desk and then view/download articles
from journals that I or my institution have a subscription to. We already
have library rates for journals that everyone at that institution has
rightful access to--its not hard to imagine how a file of access codes
could be maintained on campus computers, providing the same kind of
access. In fact my library is already replacing many subscriptions with
participation in a service (from CARL I think) that mails articles to the
faculty that request them overnight. Of course I might also choose to
subscribe to journals on my own.
 
The security & copyright issues don't change in severity that I can see.
Of course unauthorized copying can take place. But it happens all the
time now. Since less will be on paper in the first place somewhat tighter
control can be maintained over what is copied. Of course someone could
hack or steal codes. But again, would the amount of theft be greater
than it is now? I think the key thing is that there would be a clear line
between what is free and what has to be paid for. A user would have to
break a law to avoid paying up.
 
Would this be cheaper than paper publishing? I think this debate can only
be settled when a significant amount of e-publishing which attempts to
re-coup its full cost is done. The costs of production, distribution
software, net usage, and maintainance of user software/hardware are far
too variable for anyone to make a very convincing case either way. I
think its important to get past the dichotomy of net users, like myself,
who are used to everything being free; and commercial publishers looking to
maximize profits and avoid loss of market. Some content will be free,
some will be cheap, some will be expensive. The issue that should be
focused on is how all of this can be distributed and paid for when
payment is expected. Then we'll see what markets develop.
 
 
Bill Ball
ball@trenton.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Feb 1994 13:18:52 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         schull@cvs.rochester.edu
Subject:      Circulation, Billing of E-Publications
 
 
To the moderator and list-members.
 
I very much appreciate the discussion and feedback on SoftLock's
and related strategies, and have tried to some consolidate useful
clarifications and elaborations in the following  230-line
message.  All of it is self-serving, so caveat emptor.  But I do
think we have a lot to contribute to the disucssion and the
industry.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Some of the unattributed quotes below are from Todd Jacobs.
I've tried to peg others explicitly.
 
 
>:   The price of the 'document' is going to have to be very low. Near $1.
>: At $1, it isn't worth the processing to support it. At $5-$10, most people
>: are going to wander over to the departmental magazine rack and pick up
>: paper, spend another ten minutes with gopher/www and find another
>: journal, etc.
>
>Exactly.  That's why I've long espoused ad-supported electronic
>publishing, rather than traditional subscription-based publishing.  If
>the prices aren't lower than hardcopy magazines -- or even free -- people
>will stick with the "tried-and-true" hardcopy magazines.
 
SoftLock's online voucher scheme (no, its not quite implemented
yet, but we're talking theory aren't we?) allows prices to be set
as low as one wants, e.g., 25 cents.  (How much does it cost to
automatically return an Email message?)  Our minimal transaction
charge of $1.50 pertains to 1-800-calls to our credit card
processing system.  But with that one call, one can purchase a
voucher for an arbitrary amount, which is then debited
incrementally.
 
>:   Recording passwords to access it again is just a hassle. I'm going
>: to save it decoded, and if someone else asks to see it, they are going
>: to get the decoded version.
 
This is something we're concerned about also.  Our prototype
(EASL--the EAsy SoftLock shell) takes a first step in that
direction by automatically storing Product-Number Password pairs.
I'm not satisfied with it, but the important point is that all of
this book-keeping can be, should be, and will be, taken care of by
User's client applications.  If you own the password to a
document or executable, it can be invoked automatically when you
access the product.
 
>It won't be dedicated pirates
>who defeat software based locking devices, it'll be average people who
>just want the content, and not the hassle.
 
Right.  So the solution is to make the password purchase- and
use-protocols so simple and inexpensive that it is less hassle to
follow the rules than it is to defeat the scheme.  (Newspaper
vending machines are easy to defeat, but they suffice for their
niche.)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Michael Richardson points out that scholars have the least
spending discretion, but he should check out his xeroxing bill.
It is in all parties interest (including the trees!) that buying
a copy of an electronic document be cheaper than making a copy of
a physical document.  And you CAN take a SoftLocked document home
with you, if you link the password to a SoftLock-ID-bearing
FlopKey.
 
>  Recording passwords to access it again is just a hassle. I'm going
>to save it decoded, and if someone else asks to see it, they are going
>to get the decoded version.
 
The issue is options--yours and the publisher's.  For obvious
reasons, publishers will want to charge extra for the right to
posess their property in piratable form.  If the price is
acceptable, you should pay it.  If it is not, you and the vendor
have to make some economic, and possibly moral, decisions.
--------------------------
>I tried a survey, asking people what they
>liked/disliked about the magazine.  In a full year of running the survey,
>I got two -- only TWO -- responses.
>
>I have become cynical, and see reader apathy as a force to be reckoned
>with.
 
I don't think apathy is really the issue.  I really feel bad
about many of the surveys I decline to respond to.  But TIME is
the real limiting resource for many of us, and responding to
surveys takes time, and the rewards are delayed (if they occur at
all).  [Putting on his experimental psychologist's hat, he
continued...] delay-of-reward is a tremendously important factor
in influencing behavior.  That's why we've working so hard to
automate and streamline our Password Purchase system.
----------------------------------------
>This SoftLock idea is interesting.  In response to anotheer article, I
>expressed my belief that "crippled" journals will find readers to be less
>receptive, and have difficulty attracting new readers.  However, your
>project has some interesting possibilities.
>
>What kinds of costs to the publisher are involved?  If they are
>significant, then I doubt that the non-commercial or hobbyist publishers
>will find it useful.  In point of fact, one of the main attractions of
>e-publishing is the low overhead: no printing costs, no consumable
>resources (ie. ink, paper), and no distribution costs.  If the publisher
>has to pay for each unlocked copy, then it could become a financial
>nightmare, and remove the low overhead benefit.
 
Agreed.  So we've tried to take the burden off the publisher.
Our Password Purchase system at 1-800-SoftLock can sell ANYONE's
product, and if the Publisher want to be the perceived vendor they can
route their own 800-numbers to our system.  (The user dials
1-800-GoodBook, and instead of hearing "Thank you for calling
SoftLock Services", hears the GoodBook people's own customized
recordings.  At the end of the month, it's "GoodBook" that appears
on the customer's credit card bill.)
 
>Should the publisher choose to pass the cost along to the reader, how
>would he collect?  Credit cards?  Then he would loose the readership of
>all those who don't have a credit card.  Bill by 900 numbers?  Those
>numbers have an unsavory reputation, and might make the enterprise
>unpopular.  Require pre-payment by check?  Then you loose the instant
>gratification that is electronic publishing's main claim to fame.
 
I believe that between credit cards and pre-purchased vouchers we
can handle most people's needs.  If customers keep a few pre-
purchased vouchers on hand (like the xeroxing card I keep in my
wallet) they can have their instant gratification.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>For good or ill, we live in a cyberspace environment where "shareware"
>has come to mean freeware, and pirated software has become overly
>common.  Assuming for the moment that your software lock can't be cracked
>(unlikely, since almost anything can be), you will have to compete for
>attention with the freeware, unlocked journals.
 
Agreed.  And we do not claim that our locks are uncrackable.
They can be augmented as the niche warrants, but our goal is that
most customers find it easier and more rewarding buy and unlock
the product than to pirate or crack it.  To the extent that we
can realize that goal, much shareware will stop being "freeware".
(And 'lest we over-mourn the passing of an era, I think this will
increase rather than decrease the amount of free material out
there.  Good SoftLocked products will quite a bit away, in order
to get themselves distributed.
 
 
>Money is important.
YES
>Will the reader get the key by calling an 800 number?
YES
>Or can he send a request to an email robot, and get instant registration?
SOON
>If neither happens (ie. he has to call long-
>distance or wait for x days for his key), he is likely to lose
>interest in the interim.
RIGHT. FORGETABBOUDIT
 
>My arguments could be set aside, since the Internet is an ideal medium
>for instant registrations.  However, the Internet is not the sum total of
>Cyberspace.  What about copies distributed on BBS systems, or by Fidonet-
>or QWK-style networks?  Getting someone to download a "crippled" copy in
>an environment where a one MB multimedia emag can take up to 2 hours is
>NOT a good way to widen distribution.
 
True.  But SoftLocked products also like to be put (for free)
onto inexpensive CDROMS which can be (for example) donated to,
and checked out from public libraries.  We think our strategy
applies to cyberspace generally.
--------
Jane-Ellen Long writes...
 
>William Ball wrote suggesting that a modification of Acrobat to
>require publishers' passwords would permit us to publish on the
>net freely, while charging anyone who actually wanted access to
>our stuff.
>
>The problem I see with the specific suggestion is that Acrobat
>is an *exchange* program: the original files have to be formatted
>in some readable way, whether that's Mac Word or SGML coding. Thus,
>anyone with the source application can manipulate the published
>documents at will.
 
Not so.  If SoftLock-savvy is built into the application, you can
constrain access any way you want.  (This is the purpose of our
Programmer's ToolKits).   Even if it is not built into the
application, our DOS Document ToolKit demonstrates that a
document can be kept encrypted on disk even as it is rendered
fully viewable in the context of the appropriate password.  (The
way it works is that SoftLock.exe decrypts material on the fly
and passes it on to the Editor/Viewer, e.g., MSWord.  To prevent
piracy, it re-encrypts all material being written to disk.)
 
Please note--none of these products and strategies have been
taken as far they can go, and no one knows where they will really
go.  But they are usable even now, and available for
experimentation (and augmentation).   For more information Email
IntroLong@SoftLock.com for a 400-line backgrounder, or check out
the SoftLock Server on the World Wide Web (coming soon to a
terminal near you).   If you have an application or publication
that is ready to go, call me!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Paul M. Gherman writes that
 
>Bill Balls' suggestion is a play on what OCLC is already doing with Current
>Clinical Trials and other journals to come. The publisher creates the content,
>OCLC provides the computer storage, reader software, and telecommunications
>ports. The publisher sets the subscription rates and pays OCLC for the cost of
>providing the journal.
 
Our strategy is similar, but we are trying to put the production
tools into the publishers and authors hands.  If a client's
producs are selling we will (at our discretion) put it on our
server at no added cost (in order to increase our commissions).
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, Nicholas Bowskill writes
 
 
>Would it be possible to use the supermarket technique of
>wiping a credit card but this time the user would do it
>at their end and tap in the amount it was to be debited
>and that would be to the publishers account ?
>
>This would not overcome the problem of copying obviously, so
>the true income potential would be diminished.
 
Taduuummm!  If you configure your product so that the instantly-
purchasable Password is user- or workstation-specific, then
copying becomes free distribution and income potential is
multiplied, not diminished.
 
=============================================================================
Jonathan Schull, Ph.D., President, SoftLock Services Inc. Schull@SoftLock.com
963 East Ave. #1, Rochester, NY 14607-2251           716-242-0348 (voice/fax)
=============================================================================
For info about SoftLock Services (400 lines)....Email  IntroLong@SoftLock.com
For info about SoftLock DOS Document Toolkit....Email   SLDocKit@SoftLock.com
For info about FlopKey for DOS..................Email    FlopKey@SoftLock.com
============================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Feb 1994 08:23:53 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Jason Snell 
Subject:      Re: Circulation
 
>I have become cynical, and see reader apathy as a force to be reckoned
>with.  Your idea has a slightly different slant to it than my ill-fated
>survey, and is definitely worth a shot.  I will spend some time
>considering how to implement it within the magazine.
 
I'd encourage everyone to think about this method (e-mail "notification
lists") as a good option.
 
While I know that I can't have solid numbers about how many people read
_InterText_, I do know that my circulation is at the very least about 1300,
because that's the number of people who either receive the issue in their
e-mail when it comes out or receive a short note notifying them that it's
up on the FTP site, Gopher, and WWW.
 
While people might be too lazy to return a survey, you can turn that
laziness to an advantage. People would rather just be notified when your
issue is ready to be picked up (especially if your production schedule is
erratic) than be forced to continually check for your publication on sites,
hoping a new one is there, eventually becoming discouraged or forgetting to
look. A notification list provides a constant reminder that you exist, and
performs a reader service, as well.
 
-jason
 
----
Jason Snell / Editor, InterText Magazine / Assistant Editor, MacUser Magazine
"The sea was angry, like an old man sending     | jsnell@ocf.berkeley.edu
back soup in a delicatessen!" -- _Seinfeld_     |     jsnell@etext.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Feb 1994 08:24:12 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <199402231321.AA13175@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "N.W.D
              Bowskill" at Feb 23, 94 08:22:28 am
 
> Would it be possible to use the supermarket technique of
> wiping a credit card but this time the user would do it
> at their end and tap in the amount it was to be debited
> and that would be to the publishers account ?
 
But I will go back to an older argument of mine: do we have to
envision scholarly production as a commodity that has to be paid
for. Is it so horrendous to think that research can be removed
from commercial circuits and laws of the market, so-called?
Given, once more, that many non commercial scholarly journals
could not survive without grants and without library subscriptions
coming from other public funds, why not short-circuit the whole
system inview of the fact that transforming the products of research
into commodities has never solved all the problems associated with the
various functions of scholarly texts. Commercial circuits do solve
in part (and only in part) diffusion processes, but they do not help
archiving and they do not improve the legitimacy of journals in any way.
I believe university presses and libraries should join their head in this
matter and start devising new ways to cut out very costly and useless
intermediaries. All is needed is a bit of imagination and less
fetishism vis-a-vis market and money.
>
> This would not overcome the problem of copying obviously, so
> the true income potential would be diminished.
>
Copying already exists with print, thanks to the Xerox machine. So,
the problem is not new; it has only changed shape and, of course,
digitizing information has only contributed to underscoring a plain fact --
and I will be very trite here -- namely that it is hard to commodify it
and that doing so goes against its deepest grain.
 
As a final note, I would say, however squarely I have stated my position
earlier, that such discussions are extremely important and must be carried
on as serenely as we can manage (which does not preclude vigor, by the
way) because we had better have some good answer when the electronic
crunch comes. Already, outfits like Elsevier try to harden electronic
text artificially (viz. the Tulip experiment) so as to commodify their
journals in an electronic format. Their solution is obviously flawed
(one only has to look at the size of their files to get a sense of that:
11 gigabits for 105 000 pages), but it is a sure sign of the coming
battle and of the ways in which lines are going to be drawn. On the side
of scholars and universities, there are many fine minds and lots of
resources that only wait to be marshalled in such a way that scholalrly
communication can function to achieve the best form of human distributed
intelligence on this planet, rather than insure some profits somewhere
in London or Amsterdam.
 
Sorry for the soapbox finale, but there are deep feelings here...
 
Best to all,
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Feb 1994 08:24:31 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <199402231324.AA13229@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from
              "schull@cvs.rochester.edu" at Feb 23, 94 08:23:13 am
 
>
>
>
> You've described us to a "T".  I don't know why no-one has done it
> before us, but we're doing it now.  Our tools are ready for incorporation
> into anyone's program, and we our Password-sales system is available
> to anyone anytime (dial 1-800-SoftLock).
>
> For more info, Email IntroLong@SoftLock.com.
> No subject.  You'll get a 400-line backgrounder.
> Inquiries welcome.
>
> Schull@SoftLock.com
>
Here we go: idea after idea to transform thought and knowledge into
mere merchandise. Alack, alack! If only were as creative to protect
the integrity of the best in the human: intelligence and its translation
into texts, images and sounds.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Feb 1994 08:24:47 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <199402231333.AA13477@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from
              "andy2@violet.berkeley.edu" at Feb 23, 94 08:24:41 am
 
> I still believe that there's no immediate way to charge for publication
> except by restricting access to the server, a la Compuserve. That means
> no gophering, no fun, no great added value. If this whole ball of wax
> is going to roll, we need to figure out another way to get back the
> cost of that first copy, other than spreading it over all the copies used.
> But's that's another extended conversation.
>
> Jane-Ellen Long
> University of California Press
> andy2@violet.berkeley.edu
>
Exactly: we're back to the black-coated Victorian age when everything
had to be sold and the commercial scholarly journal was invented.
No fun. No great added value. Money. Money. Money.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Feb 1994 08:25:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Michael Richardson 
Organization: Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
In article <2ke3c9$30l@clarknet.clark.net>,
Digital Publisher  wrote:
>Which brings us back to the original question: If you don't charge the
>end user, how do you measure readership accurately?
 
  As was said before, if the documents are based on gopher/WWW or
email servers (or all three in my case), then you have log files. This
establishes the *minimum* readership. You can tell your advertisers
that. If you have some notion of how much 'email this to Joe, he'd
be interested' goes on, you can extrapolate.
  This business of downloading, uploading, and various BBS systems
is relevant to more "trivial" publications (those that deal with
with culture/fashion/etc. a la Vogue, etc..). However, I suspect that
in the near future more and more people will regard freenet type
systems as being the best place to 'browse' --- and even then, more
and more Fidonet BBS systems are going the "Internet" way, at least
wrt email.
 
  As was asked by another, what about the issue of anonymous transactions:
I sure don't want advertisers making lists of what I read.
 
 
--
 :!mcr!:             HOME: mcr@sandelman.ocunix.on.ca  +1 613 788 2600 3853
 Michael Richardson  WORK: mcr@ccs.carleton.ca         (Conservation Ecology)
Here is an HT
ML reference to my bio.
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:17:20 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         schull@cvs.rochester.edu
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <01H99A48XUQS8WX2XQ@ACC.HAVERFORD.EDU> from "Guedon Jean-Claude"
              at Feb 24, 94 08:24:31 am
 
>Here we go: idea after idea to transform thought and knowledge into
>mere merchandise. Alack, alack! If only were as creative to protect
>the integrity of the best in the human: intelligence and its translation
>into texts, images and sounds.
 
>>Jean-Claude Guedon
 
 Believe it or not, many of us newly-mercantile type agree that
this really IS a crucial issue, and we are eager to demonstrate
(and help it be true) that the OPTION of selling intellectual
property will increase the amount (and decrease the price) of
intellectual property which is actually available, at the same
time that it increases the perceived value of intelligence (which
is of course inestimable, and not the kind of thing to which one
should attach a price tag).
 
=============================================================================
Jonathan Schull, Ph.D., President, SoftLock Services Inc. Schull@SoftLock.com
963 East Ave. #1, Rochester, NY 14607-2251           716-242-0348 (voice/fax)
=============================================================================
For info about SoftLock Services (400 lines)....Email  IntroLong@SoftLock.com
For info about SoftLock DOS Document Toolkit....Email   SLDocKit@SoftLock.com
==========================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:17:59 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James O'Donnell 
Subject:      dollars and sense
 
I admire and share Jean-Claude Guedon's commitment to keeping first things
first.  I don't know what economic system will emerge to pay for the
production and distribution of information in the networked environment, but
I'm mathematically certain that it won't be a restrictive,
pay-by-the-mouthful, Rube Goldberg imitation of the system that works in a
world where the distribution of information is closely associated with the
distribution of a commodity (to wit, pressed sheets of organic material).
Freed from the paper page, information wants to be free:  to change its shape
and form, to flit from one place to another, to be shared, to be ubiquitous.
Seen that way information is a very attractive sort of critter, and the idea
that it can only be allowed to live on condition that it is tame and docile
and lives on a leash is both repugnant and impractical.  There will be little
ankle-biter lapdog packets of information sold at great price, I'm sure, but a
whole wild forest of hearty, roaring infolions will also be out there creating
their own ecosystem.
        Pardon the metaphors, but it's important for our own survival as
information professionals of one kind or another to realie this.  If we set as
first value that our institutions and our salaries and our controlling role
must be preserved, we risk going the way of the Benedictine abbots and bishops
of the 15th and 16th centuries who relied on traditional information economics
to preserve their authority.  I like the story of the bishop of London who
didn't like Mr. Tyndale's translation of the New Testament, so he gave his man
of business a sack of coins and told him to go out and buy up all the copies
there were to get it off the streets -- a very medieval tactic.  Only trouble
was, the book was printed, and after all the money had been spent, Tyndale and
his man of business sat down with their accounts, saw they were doing quite
well, and printed up a few hundred more copies.  Bishops of London have never
been the same since.  In that setting, a cash economy and industrialization
had a liberating effect.  Today, the exact same techniques can only have a
suffocating effect.  But in the it isn't the information we will suffocate,
but ourselves.
        Practically, this suggestion:  the academic sector of society
subsidizes a very high percentage of the costs of the production and
distribution of printed scientific and scholarly publishing already.  It pays
people like me to use the libraries it pays for to write the books that those
same libraries buy.  There's a lot of up-front money in the system already,
and being inefficiently used (e.g., money paid to people who are not actively
drawn in to the publishing cycle and spend their time cultivating writer's
block).  THAT money is a more than sufficient nest egg with which to start
creating alternatives.  That's what Jean-Claude Guedon has done with Surfaces,
and what we are doing with Bryn Mawr Classical and Medieval Reviews.  My
prediction is that while the cost-recovery-intensive sector fiddles around
trying to invent the invisible wheel, the information that has high value will
indeed go busting out into the new forest and do quite well for itself.
 
Jim O'Donnell
Classics, U. of Penn
jod@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:18:34 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "EDWARD M. (TED) JENNINGS" 
Subject:      Re: Circulation
 
About circulation and Listservs:  We know that _EJournal_ has more than
3200 subscribers.  Some of those addresses no longer exist; we can
remove them when the mailing bounces.  Subscribers can UNSUB at any
time; a few usually do after each distribution.  But each issue usually
brings a moderate net increase in subscribers.  About 5% of the
late-1992 subscribers answered a questionnaire.  Ted Jennings,  _EJournal_
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:19:40 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Gail Clement, FIU Reference" 
Subject:      Call LFor Presenters
 
CALL FOR PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS!
 
(please forgive the duplication if this is cross-posted.)
 
Would you like to teach a half-hour, one-hour or two-hour
session, lead a small discussion, or provide a poster session
in an area of Internet access in which you are particularly
knowledgeable?
 
The Science and Technology Section--PLS keep reading those of you
in the humanities and social sciences!-- Section of ACRL is organizing
an all-day ACRL Program on Monday, June27th entitled
"Scholarly Resources on the Internet: Beyond the Basics".
 
Concurrent sessions of 1/2 hr, 1 hr, & 2 hrs are still available
and will provide information for the intermediate or experienced
user in scholarly internet resources, in issues and/or opportun-
ities presented by the Internet.
 
There are still opportunities to volunteer for:
 
1.  Presentation or hands-on demonstration of scholarly resources
in an area of your expertise.  This could be by subject--a field
in the humanities, social sciences or sciences--or by format--
such as full text resources, e-journals, etc.
 
2.  Small group discussion of a specialized issue or problem such
as evaluating electronic resources, collection development of
e-journals, staff/patron training, or a particular Internet tool.
 
3.  A poster session showing how your Library has responded to
one of the many Internet challenges.
 
We expect this all-day program will be very popular.  We are planning to have
support/coordinators available to assist you with your session.
If you wish to volunteer, or to suggest another expert, please respond to
Patricia Kreitz, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center,
e-mail PKREITZ@SLACVM.SLAC.STANFORD.EDU by Monday, February 28.
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:23:21 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         John Franks 
Organization: Northwestern University, Dept. of Mathematics
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
In article ,
  wrote:
>William Ball wrote suggesting that a modification of Acrobat to
>require publishers' passwords would permit us to publish on the
>net freely, while charging anyone who actually wanted access to
>our stuff.
>
 
I think that there is no chance for any password scheme to succeed.
Would you really want to enter a password every time you read a
magazine or newspaper?  How about a different password for each one?
What if my university library subscribes?  Must I go to the library
and have librarian enter the password or will the library give it
to me?  This just seems unworkable to me.  Schemes requiring me to
get a particular piece of software or hardware which decodes a
publication are even worse.
 
>
>I still believe that there's no immediate way to charge for publication
>except by restricting access to the server, a la Compuserve. That means
>no gophering, no fun, no great added value. If this whole ball of wax
>is going to roll, we need to figure out another way to get back the
>cost of that first copy, other than spreading it over all the copies used.
>But's that's another extended conversation.
>
 
Actually restricting access to certain internet addresses is one way
which might be feasible.  The publisher would sell a subscription to
a domain (berkeley.edu) or a particular computer (violet.berkeley.edu).
Access could be by any standard software like Mosaic.
 
But I think this is less likely than some alternatives. If you look
to history for parallels consider the advent of radio.  I expect to
see a lot of free publications containing many ads.  When the
"information super-highway" is fully deployed subscriptions as with
cable TV may be possible.
 
 
John Franks     Dept of Math. Northwestern University
                john@math.nwu.edu
 
 
 
 
John Franks     Dept of Math. Northwestern University
                john@math.nwu.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:23:38 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Pieter van der Walt BIB 308 
Organization: Rand Afrikaans University
Subject:      Abstracting and Indexing of Electronic Journals
 
I am writing a research paper on the current state of access to
electronic journals, specifically electronic subject journals. Getting hold
of an issue of an electronic journal is relatively easy - if you know the
correct paths, addresses, etc. - whatever applies.
 
What I'd like to know is, is there any service or database available that
abstracts and indexes electronic subject journal articles? Similar to
conventional abstracting and indexing journals,eg. Chemical Abstracts,
Computer Select, Science Citation Index, ERIC, etc.
 
In other words, is there a service that can be searched by subject,
author, title, etc. and give the appropriate abstracts, bibliographic
references and proper procedures to acquire the relevant article in its
electronic format? (ie. email, ftp, gopher, telnet, www, etc.)
 
Maybe something similar to OCLC's Online Journal of Current Clinical
Trials (OJCCT) or the indexing of the electronic journal 'New Horizons in
Adult Education' in ERIC. Unfortunately it doesn't seem as if ERIC
abstracts individual articles or cites the origins of this electronic
journal, it is only briefly mentioned.
 
If there are any such services:
        How do I get access to it?
        What subjects fields are covered?
        Approximately how many electronic journals are taken up by
                these abstracting and indexing services?
 
Thanks in advance for any comments and references.
 
Pieter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. P.W.van der Walt                     Internet:PVDW@info.rau.ac.za
Library: Information Technology          Tel: 27(11)489-2166
Rand Afrikaans University                Fax: 27(11)726-7723
Aucklandpark                             Telex: 424526SA
2006
Republic of South Africa
----------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:23:52 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Paul F. Burton" 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
At  8:24 am 24/2/94 -0500, Guedon Jean-Claude wrote:
 
>>
>Here we go: idea after idea to transform thought and knowledge into
>mere merchandise. Alack, alack! If only were as creative to protect
>the integrity of the best in the human: intelligence and its translation
>into texts, images and sounds.
>
Thank you, Jean-Claude.  I though perhaps it was just me who was begining
to wonder about all these suggestions about how someone, somehow can make
money out other people's ideas, efforts. etc.
 
If ever there was a case for universities and research institutions taking
back control of their output, I think it has just been made.
 
We should be talking about how e-publications should add value to the
output of knowledge, not how we can adapt paper-based pricing mechanisms to
the new media.
 
Paul
 
_______________________________
 
Paul F. Burton
Department of Information Science,
University of Stratchlyde
26 Richmond Street, GLASGOW G1 1XH
 
e mail  paul@dis.strath.ac.uk
 
Tel:  +44 (0)41 552 4400 ext 3706
Fax: +44 (0)41 553 1393
_________________________________
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 25 Feb 1994 09:24:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         bob jansen 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
Billing for ejournals/ is impossible once the journal has passed to the
user. Modern technology makes it too easy to by-pass copy protection etc,
so I dont think asking the user to send a msg to the publishers with
details of a payment will work. The only way is to limit access to the
stuff at source, ie. you need to pay the publisher for access. THis is not
foolproof but at least stops the majority from free access. This model
seems to work ok for conventional journals, publishers do get paid although
photocopying does make things easier to avoid copying. Most people however
seem honest.
 
bobj
 
-------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
email: jansen@syd.dit.csiro.au
 
Address until March 1994
CNRS Institut des Textes et Manuscrits Modernes,
61, rue de Richelieu, 75084 Paris Cedex 02, France
Phone (+33 1) 42 96 30 94  Fax (+33 1) 47 03 89 40
 
Normal address
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus, North Ryde NSW 2113
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113
Phone: +612 325 3100  Fax: +612 325 3101
-------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 28 Feb 1994 12:05:47 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <9402231348.AA00212@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM>
 
 
> From Todd Jacobs:
> That's why I've long espoused ad-supported electronic
> publishing, rather than traditional subscription-based publishing.
 
There are two problems with ad-supported publishing, besides
the current network "allergy" to blatant commercialism.
One is that you need a mass market, so publications serving
100 to 1000 customers are infeasible.  The other is that
your content will be dictated by the needs of the advertisers
-- if not directly, then through the need to retain your
"circulation" with appropriate demographics.
 
Advertising support is a great way to make money if you do
have a mass market, but the Internet opens new possibilities
in niche publishing.  Todd rightly points out that reader
apathy is a tremendous barrier to selling text over the
Internet, and that will be especially true if your publication
appears to serve advertisers rather than readers.  However,
it is possible to find a core of readers willing to pay for
specific help with their immediate problems.  ("Clients"
seems a suitable term for them.)  Shape your entire publication
process to their needs, and spread the cost among them as
fairly as you can.  The market will be small, but there is
great satisfaction in helping people so directly.
 
It works for me.
 
                                        -- Ken Laws
 
 
Dr. Kenneth I. Laws; (415) 493-7390; laws@ai.sri.com.
Ask about my weekly AI/IS/CS online news service.
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 28 Feb 1994 12:08:16 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Joseph Raben 
Subject:      Re: Call LFor Presenters
In-Reply-To:  Message of Fri,
              25 Feb 1994 09:19:40 EST from 
 
One might be more interested in volunteering if you had said what ACRL is
and where the meeting will be held.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 28 Feb 1994 12:09:01 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Robin Peek, Simmons College" 
Subject:      Call for Papers-JASIS
 
This message may be cross-posted to other LISTSERVs
 
                      Call for Papers
 
              Special Topics Issue of JASIS
                   Electronic Publishing
 
     In the April, 1992 issue of JASIS, an  Editorial  was run  that
announced  a  new series of special topic issues. The sixth such issue
is scheduled to come out in  late  1995 on the topic of Electronic
Publishing.  The guest editor for this special issue will be Professor
Robin Peek  of  Simmons College.
 
Electronic publishing (e-publishing) is creating new ways of thinking
about publishing. This form of publishing utilizes computers and/or
networks for the creation, delivery, or dissemination of 'published"
information. Publishing has special attributes that differentiate it from
communication. It implies the creation of a "thing" whether
that be an e-journal, an online book, a CD, and so forth.
Publishing has finality, responsibility, legal, and even moral
implications. When something is published, the authors ask for
readership and the chance for the information to be
considered important.
 
Papers are solicited in the areas of particular aspects of
research done in areas of electronic publishing, including
theoretical and working models.   Scholarly essays will be
considered.
 
Topics  of interest  include,  but  are  not limited to, the
following:
 
     User studies
     Models of delivery
     Application of newer technologies (i.e. virtual reality,
     multi-media)
     Economics of delivery
     E-publishing management
     Policy or legal research
 
     Four copies of the manuscript should be sent to:
 
     Professor Robin Peek
     Graduate School of Library and Information Science
     Simmons College
     300 The Fenway
     Boston, MA  02115-5898
     USA
 
     Voice: (617) 521-2807
     Fax:   (617) 521-3191
     Email: rpeek@vmsvax.simmons.edu
 
     Manuscripts must be  submitted  in  hardcopy  (i.e.,
paper) form.  Inquiries may be directed to Professor Peek by
voice, fax, or email.
 
     The deadline for accepting manuscripts  for
consideration  for  publication in this special issue is December
31, 1994.  All manuscripts will be reviewed by a select panel of
referees,  and those accepted will be published in a special
issue of the Journal of the American Society  for  Informa-
tion  Science  (JASIS).   Of course, original artwork and a
signed copy of the copyright release form will  be  required for
all accepted papers.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 28 Feb 1994 12:09:35 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Andrew Currie 
Subject:      Would like to post this to your VPIEJ-L
 
Request for information about, or proposals for, an integrated electronic
journal/archive online publishing system
 
This is a general call to qualified system consultants, integrators, and
software developers. We would like to launch a new scholarly electronic
journal in a specific chemistry field. It will serve both as an archive
from which it is possible to download information as well as a publishing
medium for scholars who wish to contribute their research patents or
articles. The journal must be able to lead a person through the stages of
selecting a topic using keywords. It will then lead them through relevant
abstracts and papers until that information which interests them may be
downloaded. A person who wants to submit an article should be led through a
"filing system" to enter their article in the correct place with the
appropriate keywords. Great attention must be paid to user-friendliness,
security, cost, reliability, self-editing capability, anonymity, and
accessibility.
 
Anyone who believes that they can make this vision a reality via hardware
and software integration or can tell us of someone who might do so please
send your comments or proposals to:
 
Sherif Sakr
Metre-General, Inc.
9095 Marshall Court
Westminister, CO 80030.
 
We will respond with a detailed outline of the "journal" we envision and at
that time we will discuss features, costs, and consulting fees.
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Sherif Sakr
Metre-General, Inc.
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
End Post
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 28 Feb 1994 12:11:11 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: Abstracting and Indexing of Electronic Journals
In-Reply-To:  <199402251430.AA15975@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "Pieter van
              der Walt BIB 308" at Feb 25, 94 09:23:38 am
 
> What I'd like to know is, is there any service or database available that
> abstracts and indexes electronic subject journal articles? Similar to
> conventional abstracting and indexing journals,eg. Chemical Abstracts,
> Computer Select, Science Citation Index, ERIC, etc.
>
> In other words, is there a service that can be searched by subject,
> author, title, etc. and give the appropriate abstracts, bibliographic
> references and proper procedures to acquire the relevant article in its
> electronic format? (ie. email, ftp, gopher, telnet, www, etc.)
 
Surfaces is indexed in the MLA bibliography.
 
Best,
 
Jean-Claude Guedon