VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

March 1994

=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Mar 1994 14:42:08 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
N.W.D Bowskill (N.W.D.Bowskill@durham.ac.uk) wrote:
 
: The only other option would be to use the net to inform people of one's
: latest literary nugget and to have them, on that basis, obtain a copy
: via mail order. The only problem with this might be the volume of
: nuggets about which people would be informed !
 
This option would have few benefits over traditional paper publishing.
Most of the benefit from e-publishing stems from the low overhead.  If
you have to sort through stacks of mail and send out disks, that's going
to raise your overhead significantly.
 
Another point to consider is thet emags offer a lot of "instant
gratification."  You see it, you download it, you read it -- all without
leaving your chair, or waiting for more than a few minutes for the
download.  If people had to wait on the US mail service, they delay
factor would be much larger, and the impulse to read a new magazine would
probably fade in the interim, assuming the person even went to the bother
of phoning/writing in an order in the first place.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Mar 1994 14:42:40 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Digital Publisher 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      Free vs. Commercial
 
I've seen a lot fo comments lately about how information on the Internet
should be free.  This is an enticing, but misleading, idea.  The Internet
itself is NOT free.  A lot of academic people seem to have this idea.
 
I was in the military for four years (in fact, today was my last day).
During that time, I had free access on our local VAX system.  My sister,
going to college out west, pays a token fee for a full semester of
Internet access.  But it is all an illusion; *someone* is paying for it.
 
Now that I am out of the military, I purchase Internet access through a
commercial provider.  The cost isn't steep, but it still costs.  Colleges
and universities don't pay directly for Internet access, but they have to
purchase and maintain VAX and Unix machines, modems, T1 lines, etc.
Those things are not cheap, and are paid for by tuition and other funds.
 
The bottom line is that, even if information is free, the actual
distribution costs somebody something.  Distributing my magazines via
Internet costs me $23 a month.  Distributing via Fidonet costs me about
$0.55 per month, but it costs every sysop in the distribution list the
same amount to pass the file on to the next hub.
 
No matter how you look at it, this information is COSTING MONEY.  To say
that wanting to recoup one's expenses, or even to make a profit, is wrong
-- well, why work if you don't get paid?  You wouldn't teach, or do
research, if you didn't get a salary or a paycheck, would you?
 
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Mar 1994 14:42:58 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Michael Richardson 
Organization: Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
 
In article <2l0lnm$95v@clarknet.clark.net>,
Digital Publisher  wrote:
>I've seen a lot fo comments lately about how information on the Internet
>should be free.  This is an enticing, but misleading, idea.  The Internet
>itself is NOT free.  A lot of academic people seem to have this idea.
 
  Ah, but other than the cost of typesetting and printing, nearly all the
other aspects: writing, reviewing, lots of editing functions *are* free. At
least,
from the point of view of the publisher.
  In reality, all of these people have "day jobs" -- many are academics, and
although they aren't paid to review articles (usually they are paid to teach),
it is something they are expected to do.
  Since many scholarly journals are subsidized upfront by the academic
societies that publish them, there is a further, real $$ contribution
towards the cost of the journal.
 
  The Internet isn't free, no. But the institutions are already paying
for it, as they are paying for the reviewers. Reading journals over the
Internet incurs a "non-incremental cost" (as those of us that are still
part of the dialup world of UUCP like to say). The connection is there,
independant of whether or not the academics use it.
 
>Now that I am out of the military, I purchase Internet access through a
>commercial provider.  The cost isn't steep, but it still costs.  Colleges
 
  This is unfortunate. Your "magazine" isn't exactly a scholarly journal.
  I expressed the opinion that the only thing people might pay for was
for the "magazine" like things. The "Vogue" and "People" of the electronic
world. These things had better be spiffy. If you can upload your 'zine to
a BBS and send it via FILE echos, then I'll bet it is ascii. That isn't
going to sell very well.
 
>research, if you didn't get a salary or a paycheck, would you?
 
  Actually... so long as I wasn't hungry. But not everyone is like that.
 
--
 :!mcr!:             HOME: mcr@sandelman.ocunix.on.ca  +1 613 788 2600 3853
 Michael Richardson  WORK: mcr@ccs.carleton.ca         (Conservation Ecology)
Here is an HT
ML reference to my bio.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 2 Mar 1994 14:44:01 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         steven cherry 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  <199402251430.AA27067@panix.com>
 
On Fri, 25 Feb 1994, John Franks wrote:
> I think that there is no chance for any password scheme to succeed.
> Would you really want to enter a password every time you read a
> magazine or newspaper?  How about a different password for each one?
> What if my university library subscribes?  Must I go to the library
> and have librarian enter the password or will the library give it
> to me?  This just seems unworkable to me.  Schemes requiring me to
> get a particular piece of software or hardware which decodes a
> publication are even worse.
>
> Actually restricting access to certain internet addresses is one way
> which might be feasible.  The publisher would sell a subscription to
> a domain (berkeley.edu) or a particular computer (violet.berkeley.edu).
> Access could be by any standard software like Mosaic.
>
> But I think this is less likely than some alternatives.
 
Actually, not at all unlikely. This is precisely the TULIP method of
Elsevier, which M Guedon descried earlier. Easy to see how intuitive it
is: Provide both the full text and the graphical pages, give it to
existing institutional subscribers, deliver it via the Internet. I should
add that it is an experiment, and that I speak for neither the company nor
the project.
 
--
  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
  Steven Cherry,                   Manager, Publishing Technologies
  Elsevier Science Publishing,     655 Sixth Ave  New York NY 10010
  212/633-3858/w      212/633-3797/f    stc@acm.org   stc@panix.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Mar 1994 08:33:47 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
In-Reply-To:  <9403021953.AB21887@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM>
 
 
> From Michael Richardson
> writing, reviewing, lots of editing functions *are* free.
 
This is the current situation in scholarly publishing, but it
need not be true for Internet publishing.  And it is certainly
not true for my own newsletter, where I am the writer, reviewer,
and editor as well as the publisher.  It's not a scholarly
publication, but it is a quality one.  (And it sells well enough,
despite being ASCII.)
 
> the only thing people might pay for was
> for the "magazine" like things. The "Vogue" and "People"
 
How sad.  Junk must be "spiffy" to sell, and scholarly
articles aren't expected to sell at all.  Perhaps if we
organized Internet publishing around *the needs of readers*
we could find people willing to pay for quality writing
without slick photos of scantily dressed starlets.
 
Edgar Allen Poe wrote for commercial circulation, as did
Mark Twain.  Edward Tufte's scholarly books on visual
presentation of information are self-published and bringing
in millions of dollars.  There is no inherent contradiction
between writing well and writing for profit.  I suspect
that there is one between publishing well and depending
on free effort from people with day jobs.
 
                                        -- Ken Laws
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Mar 1994 08:36:53 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
In-Reply-To:  <199403021943.AA10604@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from "Digital
              Publisher" at Mar 2, 94 02:42:40 pm
 
>
> I've seen a lot fo comments lately about how information on the Internet
> should be free.  This is an enticing, but misleading, idea.  The Internet
> itself is NOT free.  A lot of academic people seem to have this idea.
 
Many academics do know that Internet costs something. Everything always
costs something. What I have personally objected to is not the need to
use money, but the need to commercialize everything. Does it make sense
for governments to subsidize research, subsidize publications, subsidize
library budgets and that, in between, some people add a profit motive
to a process that has nothing to do with that logic.
>
> No matter how you look at it, this information is COSTING MONEY.  To say
> that wanting to recoup one's expenses, or even to make a profit, is wrong
> -- well, why work if you don't get paid?  You wouldn't teach, or do
> research, if you didn't get a salary or a paycheck, would you?
>
Indeed and I am paid for my research so that I believe it should be
distributed or made accessible to my colleagues and students at the lowest
possible cost. Once again, what I argue is that the products of research
are not commodities.
 
Jean-Claude Guedon
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
        Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
        Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
        Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
        C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax. 514-343-5684
        Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7
        Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 4 Mar 1994 10:06:03 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stu Weibel 
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
 
Todd Jacobs' remarks are on the mark.
 
Information is not free and will not be so.  The cost of making a
scholarly article available to the scholar in paper form is estimated
to be betweeen $10.00 and $30.00, and this range is probably
conservative.
 
These costs are no less real for being buried in capital and library
budgets, from shelving costs to electrical bills, to salaries, to work
study support.
 
The problem is how to shift gracefully from one form of delivery to
another?  The transition, likely to last beyond the lifetime of most of
the readers of this list, is particularly difficult, given that both
the paper world and the electronic world will coexist and compete for
many of the same dollars.
 
The question should always be referenced to the ultimate goal... how can
scholarship best be nourished?  The answer almost certainly
lies in a diversity of forms that fill the many niches that comprise the
ecosystem of scholarship.   And woe betide those who cannot adapt.
 
stu
 
Stuart Weibel
Senior Research Scientist
OCLC Office of Research
weibel@oclc.org
(614) 764-6081
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:32:09 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         ghermanp@kenyon.edu
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
 
Ken Laws mentions that advertisers may not be interested in supporting scholary
journals and he is right. However, a few months ago we here at Kenyon had an
interesting contact with an electonic publisher. This publisher was going to
offer us access to their service free of charge. The cost of access would have
been completely supported by a major american corporation with the proviso that
a header be added to each article which would read, " this article was brought
to you by X corportation for further details about our products see the trailer
on this article".
 
I can imagine a situation where certain chemistry journals could be paid for in
this way by Exxon for instance and given to universities with strong chemistry
departments. This would help their recruiting. How about it, Elsivier and
Exxon, we are waiting.
 
Paul
Paul M. Gherman
Director of Libraries
Olin and Chalmers Library
Kenyon College
Gamibier, OH 43022
614-427-5186 voice
614-427-2272 fax
ghermanp@kenyon.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:32:55 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Rich Wiggins 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  Message of Wed, 2 Mar 1994 14:44:01 EST from 
 
A lot of the discussion here seems to assume that one or another
delivery model is exclusive of all others. There is no reason for this
to be the case. There is every reason to believe that e-texts will be
offered according to various charging schemes:
 
-- Freely available to all readers, no advertisements
 
-- Freely available to all, lots of ads
 
-- Available to all users on a departmental, corporate, or campus
   licensing basis
 
-- Available to individual subscribers on an annual basis
 
-- Available to individual readers on a "pay per sip" basis
 
Bemoaning the "commercialization" of e-journals is understandable but it
will not stop the tide from coming in. There are already quite a few
serious free scholarly e-journals. If commercial print journals come out
in electronic form with one fee arrangement or another, this does not in
any way preclude freely-available e-journals from flourishing. To the
extent that professional societies, libraries, and university presses
can organize themselves to serve the editorial and distribution
functions, the research community will be able to circumven the high    t
costs of journals.
 
To the extent that the commercial publishers are able to do this job
better, thanks to the profit motive, then commercial e-journals will
flourish. The freely-available alternative will serve as a check on
rapacious price increases.
 
The idea that paying for e-texts is somehow a horrible relic of a
paper-based system is mixing up the question of what technology is to be
used and the issue of how authors will be rewarded for their efforts. I
pay relatively high prices for my daily New York Times fix, even though
it's a stripped-down national edition. I will always be willing to pay
for quality news coverage, and I will not waste time reading a
freely-available, but inferior, product. Why should this be any
different in the electronic realm?
 
Owners of large compilations of knowledge aren't going to organize and
offer it for free in all cases. Already on the net you find a surprising
amount of high-quality information, but most collections in any given
field are chaotically organized and incomplete. Complete "knowledge
bases" such as the Encyclopedia Brittanica envisions will cost money.
Once again freely available alternatives will complement.
 
As far as locking technology, we will probably see browsers that fetch
documents based on digital keys, and refuse to present the entire
content of a piece in an easily-grabbed clear text form. This will be
automated; neither the user nor the librarian will type in a key for
each access. The photocopy machine makes it theoretically easy to steal
books, but it's enough of a hassle that few do it. You do not need
ironclad prevention of copying; you merely need to make it hard enough
so that the reader will pay the acquisition cost.
 
Even without such locking technology, Clarinet news, American Cybercasting,
Dow Jones, and other examples prove that campus licensing need not
undercut the market for digital text, even when it'd be theoretically
easy to redistribute the text.
 
/Rich Wiggins, CWIS Coordinator, Michigan State U
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:33:12 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
In-Reply-To:  <9403041653.AA03945@Sunset.AI.SRI.COM>
 
 
> From Jean-Claude Guedon:
> Does it make sense
> for governments to subsidize research, subsidize publications, subsidize
> library budgets and that, in between, some people add a profit motive ...
 
When government pays for research, publication, and archiving,
government decides what will be studied, published, and retained.
(I have been an NSF program director, and have seen the difficulties
of this system even when good people and an enlightened government
try their best to make it work.)  When clients pay for the research,
the research that is done is quite different -- typically more
relevant to current needs, and also proprietary.  Both cultures
have their advantages and drawbacks, and it makes sense to have
some of each.
 
 
> what I argue is that the products of research
> are not commodities.
 
Some are, some aren't.  I won't try to stop you from
giving away the results of your publicly supported research;
please don't try to stop me from selling the results of my
self-supported or client-supported information research.
 
Commerce has its own beauty.  It is people doing favors
for other people, 40-60 hours per week.  We support each
other, through the exchange of things of value.  We make
each others' lives better.
 
                                -- Ken Laws
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:34:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Howard Pasternack 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
 
Internet addresses are as big a security sinkhole as passwords.
On a networked campus it is possible for a hacker to set up a SLIP
server and permit the world to dial in to the campus using the
phone lines.  And all the dial-in users take the ip address of the
SLIP machine.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:34:22 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         dhendry@aol.com
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
 
I am the writer, reviewer,
and editor as well as the publisher.  It's not a scholarly
publication, but it is a quality one.
 
I would like to learn more of your experience and methods.
Dhendry@aol.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:34:41 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Subject:      *DIDASKALIA: Ancient Theatre Today* 1,1
 
We would like to bring to your attention, as a subscriber to *Electronic
Antiquity*, that the first issue of *Didaskalia* (Volume 1 Issue 1) is now
available, and may be accessed in the same way as *EA*.  A list of contents
follows.  The editors urge you to subscribe to *Didaskalia*.
 
*DIDASKALIA:
ANCIENT THEATER TODAY*
 
ISSN 1321-4853
 
Sallie Goetsch (Founding Editor)
Oliver Taplin (Consultant)
Ian Worthington and Peter Toohey
(Publishers and Contributing Editors)
 
VOL. 1 ISSUE 1 - MARCH 1994
 
(01) LIST OF CONTENTS
 
(02) STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
 
Taplin, Oliver, 'Why *Didaskalia*?'
 
(03) EDITORIAL
 
(04) FEATURES: EDUCATION AND OUTREACH
 
Reynolds, Regina and Elizabeth, 'Primary Tragedy'
Pesko, Chris, 'Comedy and Community'
Cragun, Josh, 'Within Reach'
 
(05) LISTINGS
 
PERFORMANCES:
 
U.S.A.:
 
Aquila Productions Spring Tour
*Medea* in Lowell, MA
*Song of the Nightingale* and *Mouthful of Birds*
        in San Diego, CA
*Easy Virtue: A Reconstruction of Plautus' Cistellaria* in Ann
        Arbor, MI
*Shifting Sands*, an adaptation of the *Oresteia* and *IA*
        by Kathryn Martin, Fort Lewis, CO
Open Mike for Rhapsodes at CAMWS
*Bacchae* in Stony Brook, NY
Terence's *Mother-in-Law* in Emory, GA
 
CANADA:
 
*Maenads* in Vancouver
Atellan Farce in Vancouver
 
ENGLAND:
 
Seventh London Festival of Greek Drama
Performance of Catullus 63
 
ITALY AND SICILY:
 
Aeschylus' *Oresteia* in Milan
INDA Season in Siracusa:
*Agamemnon*
*Prometheus*
*Acharnians*
 
THE NETHERLANDS:
 
*Oedipus Tyrannos* in Rotterdam
*Antigone* in Rotterdam and Amsterdam
 
SOUTH AFRICA:
 
*Frogs* in Cape Town
 
CONFERENCES AND RESOURCES:
 
International Society for the Study of Greek and Roman Music
*The Drama Review* Student Essay Contest
Summer Workshop on Ancient Greek Theater
Workshop: Brechtian Performance of Myth
English Language Videotapes of Classical Drama
INDA Videotapes in Italian
New Work on Comparative Tragedy
 
(06) THEATER REVIEWS
 
Barone, Caterina, Euripides' *Electra* in Spoleto, Italy
Bethune, Robert W., *Trojan Women* at Mt. Holyoke College,
        U.S.A.
Goetsch, Sallie, 'Adverse Conditions, a Review of *Hecuba* at
        Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada'
Milde, Michaela, *Trojan Women* at the University of Guelph,
        Ontario, Canada
McDonald, Marianne, Timberlake Wertenbaker's *The Love of the
        Nightingale* in San Diego, U.S.A.
Rourke, Patrick, *Agamemnon* at Harvard University, U.S.A.
 
(07) BOOK P/REVIEWS
 
Marshall, C.W., Review of Slater and Zimmermann, edd.,
        *Intertextualitaet in der griechisch-roemischen Komoedie*
Slater, Niall, Review of Blundell and Cummins, *Auricula
        Meretricula* (Revised Edition)
 
(08) GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS
 
*Didaskalia* Vol. 1 Issue 1 - March 1994
edited by Sallie Goetsch, Ian Worthington and Peter Toohey
didaskalia-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
ISSN 1321-4853
------------------------
 
A general announcement (aimed at non-subscribers) that
the journal is available will be made in approximately 12
hours time over the lists - as a subscriber you will be
automatically contacted in advance when future issues
are available.
 
Volume 1 Issue 2 will be published in May 1994.
 
The editors welcome contributions, which should if possible
be kept to under 2000 words. Features and reviews should
express their main points clearly and concisely and then,
if appropriate, make suggestions for further reading. Longer
or more scholarly treatises (which will be refereed) on ancient
performance should be directed to *Electronic Antiquity* at:
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
 
Queries and contributions may be directed to the editors at:
 
didaskalia-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
 
Sallie Goetsch (sgoetsch@umich.edu)
Ian Worthington (ian.worthington@classics.utas.edu.au)
Peter Toohey (ptoohey@metz.une.edu.au)
 
(end)
---------
Ian Worthington,
Department of Classics,
University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania 7001,
Australia.
Tel. (002) 202-294 (direct)
Fax (002) 202-288
e-mail:  Ian.Worthington@classics.utas.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:35:07 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Prof. Roly Sussex" 
Subject:      Re: Free vs. Commercial
 
There has been a lot of discussion on this topic, and on the library
end in particular, on PACS-L: available on a listserv at Houston:
        LISTSERV@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU
And Steve Harnad has written and commented on discussions on
Psycoloquy and other lists about the real costs of scholarly
production and consumption - including the notion that universities
should take charge of publication as well as consumption of the
research for which they pay.
 
 
Roly Sussex
Director
Centre for Language Teaching and Research
    and
Language and Technology Centre of the National Languages and Literacy
        Institute of Australia
University of Queensland
Queensland 4072
Australia
 
email:  sussex@lingua.cltr.uq.oz.au
phone:  +61 7 365-6896 (work)
fax:    +61 7 365-7077
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:35:32 EST
Reply-To:     jpw@virginia.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         John Price-Wilkin 
Subject:      UVa Internet access to SGML Textual Analysis Resources
 
Cross-posted to many lists.
 
                UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA LIBRARY
                        presents
        INTERNET ACCESS TO SGML TEXTUAL ANALYSIS RESOURCES
 
The University of Virginia Library is pleased to announce the
Internet-accessibility of several of its text collections indexed
with Open Text's PAT search engine. With the generous permission
of Open Text Corporation and depositors of the texts included in
this effort, we are now able to provide client/server access to
several collections, including a growing body of Middle English
texts, the King James and Revised Standard Versions of the Bible,
and the Michigan Early Modern English Materials.
 
 
Although no remote login to the University of Virginia system
will be supported, access is possible through several client
software packages, including Open Text's PatMotif and a freely-
available vt100 client developed by the University of Virginia.
 
A full description of the client software and the textual
resources offered is available via anonymous ftp from
etext.virginia.edu (128.143.22.16), as /pub/announce
 
(URL: file://etext.virginia.edu/pub/announce).
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:36:33 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Micheal Strangelove 
Organization: FONOROLA Incorporated
Subject:      Internet Advertising -- Special Report
 
 
Internet Advertising -- The Internet Speaks Out
 
The April issue of THE INTERNET BUSINESS JOURNAL will be a
special report on Internet Advertising. Members of the Internet community
have strong and divided opinions about Internet-facilitated advertising,
and we would like to include a sampling of these opinions in this special
report. Here is a chance to tell the business community what you feel
about advertising on the Internet. We also invite extended commentary on
the subject (up to 2,000 words).
 
Also, if you provide an Internet advertising service of any kind, send
details to ak943@freenet.carleton.ca for inclusion in the special report's
resource section. If you have an interesting story to tell about your
business using the Internet to advertise -- or about being the recipient of
advertising on the Internet, we would also like to hear from you.
 
This special issue will be freely available on the Internet in low ASCII and
Postscript format.
 
Send your submissions to me at ak943@freenet.carleton.ca by March 11,
1994.
 
THE INTERNET BUSINESS JOURNAL welcomes letters from Internet
users on any subject but reserves the right to condense them as necessary.
Letters must include name, address and telephone number.
 
Aneurin Bosley
Editor
The Internet Business Journal
ak943@freenet.carleton.ca
 
The following commentary on one aspect of Internet-facilitated
advertising appeared in the February issue of THE INTERNET
BUSINESS JOURNAL.
 
Internet Advertising and a Level Playing Field
 
When it comes to the issue of Internet-facilitated advertising, the Internet
will never mean the same thing to large corporations as it does to the
world of small to medium size enterprises. The key difference between
small business and the corporate world is access to national and
international markets through advertising. Until the arrival of the Internet
as a business communication tool, small businesses never had access to
affordable global marketing capability -- exorbitant advertising costs
represented the final barrier to growth. The high costs of traditional means
of advertising has served to ensure that small businesses rarely grow
beyond local markets. Now that the commercial Internet has come of age,
the privileged access to global audiences previously held by the corporate
world can no longer be counted on to ensure market domination.
Privileged access to international audiences has been effectively and
permanently broken by the rise of Internet entrepreneurs.
 
Unlike the Internet, the coming Information Superhighway will not have a
significant immediate impact on small to medium size enterprises. This is
because the Information Superhighway will primarily consist of
interactive entertainment services controlled by multinationals. The cost of
entrance into this digital consumer Disney land will undoubtedly remain
out of reach of the typical small business. Television advertising has never
provided more than local advertising capability to small businesses. There
is little reason to believe that even the next generation of "smart TV's"
hooked into the InfoHighway will be significantly less expensive. The
critical difference between the Internet and the coming Information
Superhighway is ownership and membership fees. The ownership of the
InfoHighway of tomorrow will rest in the hands of an exclusive
consortium consisting of telecommunications, cable, and entertainment
industries. The Internet will remain a stark contrast -- no primary owners,
no content controllers, and almost insignificant entrance fees.
 
Whereas the largest mergers in history are occurring as a result of
multinationals jockeying for position of dominance over the
InfoSuperhighway, a quiet paradigm shift marked by the evolution of
multimedia, bi-directional Internet advertising is quietly and swiftly
growing. In the middle of this decade, the corporate world will experience
a rude awakening when they finally discover that tens of thousands of
small businesses are gaining an increasing share in the international
delivery of products and services due to the empowering effect of Internet-
facilitated advertising. With an ever increasing percentage of the economy
and job creation tied to the rise of home-based business, there exists the
distinct possibility that the balance of power may shift from inefficient,
slow moving corporate bureaucracies to highly adaptive telecommuting
entrepreneurs and virtual partnering collectives.
 
Often, the true significance of a new phenomenon lies not in the
phenomenon itself, but in the convergence between two or more new
social systems. The Internet as a communication system is historically
unique in many aspects: its size, growth rate, decentralized structure,
multi-cultural character, and subversive potential (note that any wide
spread phenomenon that displaces the distribution of power in society is
inherently "subversive" to those who experience loss of power and
control). At the very time in history when we are witness to the rise of the
Internet, we are also faced with the globalization of markets and cultures.
This generation is also witness to an unparalleled return to home-based
businesses and cottage industries. The economic bases of North America
is shifting away from the hands of the multinationals to the
microeconomics of small businesses. The economic significance of small
businesses is occurring at the very time that the Internet is able to
empower small businesses to effectively compete in the international
market. Neither the growth of small businesses nor the arrival of the
commercial Internet as isolated phenomenon represent a sufficient
precondition for a paradigm shift within the global economy. But together,
they will prove to be a radical agent of change.
 
Up until now, the most widely held assumption in macroeconomics is that
multinationals would continue to dominate global markets. But this
assumption can no longer be maintained when, in the midst of this
information age, both the medium of information is changing (paper to
digital), and the centralized control over the mass distribution of
sanctioned knowledge is eroding (the second gutenberg revolution -- every
computer on the Internet is a potential printing press serving a global
audience). Information and the knowledge it yields is power, and today we
are witnessing the beginnings of a fundamental change in both the nature
of information, the flow of information, and the control over information.
When these changes are fully realized, we will be faced with a very
different society and entirely new global economy. A key, but by no
means isolated, factor in the coming economic revolution is the Internet
and its affordable bi-directional advertising capabilities.
 
Michael Strangelove
Mstrange@Fonorola.Net
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 08:38:26 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Rich Wiggins 
Subject:      Re: billing for e-publications
In-Reply-To:  Message of Mon, 7 Mar 1994 08:34:05 EST from 
 
>Internet addresses are as big a security sinkhole as passwords.
>On a networked campus it is possible for a hacker to set up a SLIP
>server and permit the world to dial in to the campus using the
>phone lines.  And all the dial-in users take the ip address of the
>SLIP machine.
 
That is absolutely true, but it has not prevented campus licensing
to be satisfied with IP-address based schemes.  The commercial
publisher needs reasonable levels of security, not ironclad
security.
 
I don't mean to dismiss the problem lightly, but real vendors of
real documents that cost real money are satisfied with IP-address
based schemes in many cases.  Fancier digital signature type schemes
are no doubt superior, but not essential for all applications.
 
/Rich Wiggins, CWIS Coordinator, Michigan State U
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 08:38:47 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Micheal Strangelove 
Organization: FONOROLA Incorporated
Subject:      Advertising on the Internet FAQ
 
 
  Summary:
  This document contains a selection of Frequently
  Asked Questions (and their answers) about
  Internet-facilitated advertising. It should be
  read by anyone using the Internet for commercial
  purposes.
 
  Archive-name: Advertising-FAQ
  Last-Modified: n/a
  Version: 1.0
  Frequency: monthly
 
  ADVERTISING ON THE INTERNET FREQUENTLY ASKED
  QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
  Version 1.0 - 6 March, 1994
 
  *** COPYRIGHT NOTICE
  This document is Copyright (C) 1994 by Strangelove
  Internet Enterprises, Inc., all rights reserved.
  Permission for non-commercial distribution is
  hereby granted, provided that this file is
  distributed intact, including this copyright
  notice and the version information above.
  Permission for commercial distribution may be
  obtained from the Strangelove Internet
  Enterprises, Inc. Please feel free to distribute
  this document on commercial networks (AOL,
  Compuserve, Delphi, ...) and on bulletin boards.
 
  HOW TO CONTACT THE AUTHOR
 
  Michael Strangelove can be contacted by e-mail to
  Mstrange@Fonorola.Net
  or by postal mail to
  SIE Inc
  208 Somerset Street East, Suite A
  Ottawa, Ontario
  CANADA
  K1N 6V2
  Tel: 613-565-0982
  FAX: 613-569-4433
 
  INTRODUCTION
 
  Advertisers spend billions of  dollars every year
  to communicate their message to potential
  consumers. Now businesses are discovering that
  they can advertise to the Internet community at a
  fraction of the cost of traditional methods. With
  tens of millions of electronic mail users out
  there in cyberspace today, Internet advertising is
  an intriguing opportunity not to be overlooked.
  When 1998 roles around and there are one hundred
  million consumers on the Internet, we may see many
  ad agencies and advertising-supported magazines go
  under as businesses learn to communicate directly
  to consumers in cyberspace.
 
  How can a consultant, corporation, or an
  entrepreneur effectively use electronic mail to
  communicate to Internet user? The following
  document is intended to identify and answer
  frequently asked questions about Internet-
  facilitated marketing. This FAQ is based on the
  book, "How to Advertise on the Internet: An
  Introduction to Internet-Facilitated Marketing"
  (April 1994). If there are question you have about
  Internet advertising that are not addressed here,
  or if you have comments about how to improve this
  document, please feel free to contact me at
  Mstrange@Fonorola.Net.
 
  Potential advertisers take note -- do your
  homework before blasting onto the Internet. This
  virtual community has some very strong feelings
  about inappropriate activity, and the penalties
  for incorrect advertising methods could be
  international hate mail to you, your boss, and
  your stock holders.
 
  Nota Bene: It is the intention of the author to
  promote the responsible business use of the
  Internet. Businesses will be making extensive use
  of the Internet for marketing and advertising,
  regardless of how Internet members feel about the
  non-commercial origins of the Internet. The
  Internet is not destined to be a TechnoUtopia, but
  simply a microcosm of global society, with all its
  warts and flowers. This FAQ is intended as a
  proactive measure to ensure that the commercial
  Internet user has adequate information about
  Internet culture so as to contribute to the
  ongoing development of Electric Gaia.
 
  QUESTIONS ANSWERED IN THIS FAQ:
 
  Is Advertising Allowed on the Internet?
  Is Advertising on the Internet New?
  Is the Internet a Mass Market?
  Is Unsolicited Advertising Permitted?
  Can I Send an E-Ad to Every Internet User?
 
  INTERNET ADVERTISING TIPS:
 
  Find Out What is Acceptable
  Post Only to Appropriate Forums
  Keep it Short
  Avoid Sensationalism
  Create Your Own Forum
  Interact with the Internet Community
 
 
  IS ADVERTISING ALLOWED ON THE INTERNET?
 
  It is surprising how many people still see the
  Internet as a non-commercial, academic, and
  technical environment. Over fifty percent of the
  Internet is populated by commercial users (that
  equals five to ten million commercial users). The
  commercial Internet is the fastest growing part of
  cyberspace, which is doubling in size every year.
  There are more business users of the Internet than
  the total number of all the users of all
  commercial networks combined.
 
  Over three years ago the US National Science
  Foundation lifted restrictions against commercial
  use of the Internet's American backbone. Now an
  Internet address on business cards is the latest
  craze. As the Internet is not owned by any one
  company or nation, the only real restrictions
  placed upon users are by the consensus of the
  virtual community itself. The trick to effective
  Internet advertising is taking the time to learn
  what is and is not acceptable within any one of
  the more than 7,000 online conferences.
 
  The one major exception to this is any Internet
  users who have academic accounts provided by their
  university or research institute. It is almost
  certain that if you have an academic Internet
  account, you are forbidden to engage in commercial
  activity over your university's Internet
  connection. This may also hold true for many
  FreeNets -- if you are uncertain about local
  authorized use policy, ask your Internet provider
  or system postmaster.
 
  It should be noted that Usenet is no less
  commercial than the rest of the Internet. Gone
  forever are the days when the Internet was a
  private club for the techno-elite.
 
  IS ADVERTISING ON THE INTERNET NEW?
 
  Even among many long-time Internet users, there is
  a perception that Internet advertising is a new
  phenomenon. It is not. In the mid eighties, when
  the Internet was largely an academic, scientific,
  and technical community, commercial activity was
  still allowed if it was in support of research
  efforts. This meant that right from the first days
  of the Internet, there were software developers,
  publishers, consultants, and technicians hawking
  their wares to the academic community. Advertising
  has been taking place on the Internet since its
  beginning. The problem facing the Internet
  community is that the bigger the community gets
  (and it is going to be mindbogglingly big), the
  more it will attract the attention of advertising
  agencies.
 
  IS THE INTERNET A MASS MARKET?
 
  For quite some time to come, the Internet will
  never represent a mass market such as TV where
  content is controlled and packaged to a limited
  number of predefined and demographically
  homogenous audiences consisting of millions of
  views. There are no mass markets on the Internet -
  - only micro communities with distinct histories,
  rules, and concerns. These communities are
  gathered into thousands of discussion forums
  ranging from hundreds to thousands of
  participants, but there are no groups of
  "millions." The challenge of the Internet-
  facilitated business is to find a way to reach
  these virtual communities on their terms,
  respecting their local customs. The Internet is
  big, very big, but it is not a mass market that
  can be easily reached through mass mailing.
 
  IS UNSOLICITED ADVERTISING PERMITTED?
 
  Unsolicited advertising does indeed take place
  every day on the Net, and there even exists one
  company that sells access to over one million
  Internet addresses for direct e-mail advertising.
  Unsolicited advertising is a gray area of Internet
  culture, and therefore requires very careful
  planning and execution to avoid the wrath of an
  extremely vocal community.
 
  Unsolicited advertising has been taking place on
  the Internet for quite some time, but must be done
  with extreme caution. There is no one to tell you
  not to send unsolicited commercial e-mail on the
  Internet, but if you send out 10,000 annoying
  advertisements, be prepared to receive 10,000
  complaints. Also, companies that disregard
  Internet users' wishes are likely to find that the
  Internet community has a long memory (as any
  "oral" culture does) and is quite capable of
  engaging in anti-advertising campaigns and
  boycotts.
 
  In this new interactive, digital, wired-to-the-
  bellybutton world, bulk unsolicited advertising is
  unnecessary, bad netiquette, and simply lazy --
  particularly when there are so many creative
  alternatives. The author has no wish to support
  the rise of "door-to-door" salespeople in
  cyberspace and therefore is intentionally
  censoring contact information from this FAQ on
  firms that sell Internet e-mail addresses and
  consult in bulk unsolicited e-mail advertising.
 
  CAN I SEND AN E-AD TO EVERY INTERNET USER?
 
  As Editor of THE INTERNET BUSINESS JOURNAL,
  Aneurin Bosley is frequently asked if it is
  possible to send an electronic mail advertisement
  (E-Ad) to every user on the Internet. I always
  find it somewhat disturbing that there are
  companies out there who would want to do this.
  Fortunately for the Internet, it is not possible
  to send an E-Ad to every person on the Internet.
  Unfortunately for the Internet, it is probably
  only a matter of time before some sick mind
  figures out a method of simultaneously annoying
  every Internet user. For now at least, there is no
  way to post an e-mail message to every Internet
  user, nor, in this writers opinion, should such a
  tool be developed.
 
 
  INTERNET ADVERTISING TIPS
 
  FIND OUT WHAT IS ACCEPTABLE
 
  Within some Internet forums, any commercial
  activity, no matter how subtle, is unacceptable
  and will be met with a strong negative response
  (usually called "flaming"). Take the time to
  "listen in" to the forum to which you intend to
  post. Notice what other people post and what the
  grouprquote s reaction is to commercial messages.
  If a press release or product announcement is met
  with intense flaming, then do not risk alienating
  this group of Internet users with your commercial
  message.
 
  POST ONLY TO APPROPRIATE FORUMS
 
  Begin your market research by identifying the
  appropriate online conferences (also called
  forums, lists, or newsgroups). If you are a
  selling purebred dogs, do not post your message to
  the cat lover's list. Some forums have FAQ files
  (Frequently Asked Questions). Read these files to
  determine the nature of the forum and acceptable
  use policies.
 
  KEEP IT SHORT
 
  Avoid posting long e-mail messages. Your product
  or service announcements should never exceed two
  screens in length (about 50 lines long). Many
  individuals on the Internet receive a considerable
  amount of e-mail, so your message must be short
  and to the point if it is going to be read at all.
  You can note in your posting that further details
  are available upon request.
 
  AVOID SENSATIONALISM
 
  The Internet community is content oriented,
  whereas most advertisers deal in style, metaphor,
  image, and hype. Traditional advertising copy will
  not go over well at all on the Net. The Internet
  community appreciates quality, filtered
  information, so find a way to add value to your
  message. Coach your message within a commentary on
  industry trends, create an electronic newsletter
  that provides a range of related information,
  enter into dialogue with the forum about
  surrounding issues. Remember that nothing is more
  obvious in low ASCII than empty hype.
 
  CREATE YOUR OWN FORUM
 
  It is possible to create a Usenet newsgroup for
  discussion of your products (Usenet is received by
  most Internet users and contains over six thousand
  newsgroups). Many companies have already done so,
  such as ZEOS, which has a newsgroup called
  biz.zeos.general. This is a form of passive
  Internet-facilitated marketing. Passive
  advertising allows a business to create a forum on
  the Internet and invite the rest of the Internet
  to join in. By creating your own forum, moderating
  the submissions (filtering out irrelevant
  postings), and providing high quality information,
  not only about your products but about your
  particular commercial sector, you will establish a
  growing readership in much the same way that
  newsstand magazines function.
 
  INTERACT WITH THE INTERNET COMMUNITY
 
  For the immediate future, the costs of Internet-
  facilitated advertising will not be associated
  with expensive visual productions (at least until
  the domination of Mosaic and similar tools), but
  with the labor required to dialogue with the
  desired market areas found within over seven
  thousand discussion forums. This labor factor for
  truly responsible, responsive, and effective
  Internet advertising will become a critical
  consideration as the staggering Internet growth
  rate pushes these numbers to tens of thousands of
  forums and hundreds of millions of users over the
  next decade.
 
  The business world is going to have to learn a new
  language when it communicates to the Internet
  community -- the language of content-based,
  interactive, community-oriented dialogue.
  Unidirectional pontificating coming from the lofty
  heights of corporate sales and marketing offices
  will only alienate the typical Internet user. To
  be fully accepted by the majority of Internet
  users, a business will need to participate in the
  virtual communities they wish to reach. This means
  that business must be willing and prepared to
  enter into dialogue in an appropriate manner on
  the appropriate forums. Unlike any other medium
  familiar to advertisers, the Internet is fully bi-
  directional -- be prepared to answer for your
  product or service if it is less than 100%
  satisfactory. The Internet user will not hesitate
  to tell you otherwise, as well as tell the rest of
  the Internet community!
 
  A WORD OF WARNING
 
  Most advertisers will fail at their initial
  attempt at Internet-facilitated advertising. This
  is not at all surprising in light of the fact that
  most advertising in any medium is woefully
  ineffective, mind-bogglingly boring, and
  uncreative at best -- deceptive and annoying at
  worst.
 
  Why will advertisers fail when they succumb to the
  seduction of the virgin fields of the Internet?
  Traditional advertising will fail to achieve
  results on the Internet because this virtual
  community is oriented towards content. In
  contrast, advertisers usually focus on image and
  style -- broad archetypes delivered to mass
  audiences. But the language of the Internet, for
  the majority of its population, and for some time
  to come, is low ASCII (Aa-Zz, 1-9 text plus a few
  miscellaneous characters). More than being a
  mainly text-based environment, the Internet is
  first and foremost an oral culture, were the
  keyboard mediates the spoken word to a complex
  matrix of subcultures among users numbering in the
  tens of millions. Sensitivity to Internet culture
  will define success for any business entering into
  this global matrix. Remember that today's Internet
  arose out of a non-commercial environment. Be
  forewarned -- The Internet is not television, not
  the post office, and certainly not yours to do
  with it as you please.
 
  IN THE NEXT EDITION:
 
  The next edition of this FAQ will feature
  questions and answers about the ultility of Mosaic
  as the first "killer app" for
  the Internet-facilitated advertiser.
 
  ABOUT THE AUTHOR
 
  Michael Strangelove (Mstrange@Fonorola.Net) is
  founder and CEO of Strangelove Internet
  Enterprises, Inc., publishers of THE INTERNET
  BUSINESS JOURNAL, Internet Advertising Review, and
  ELECTROPOLIS: Government Online. Michael writes a
  regular column about the Internet in ONLINE ACCESS
  and has coauthored, with Diane Kovacs, The
  Directory of Electronic Journals, Newsletters, and
  Academic Discussion Lists (Association of Research
  Libraries, 1993, Third Edition). Michael is also
  author of the new book, How to Advertise on the
  Internet: An Introduction to Internet-Facilitated
  Marketing. Sample copies of THE INTERNET BUSINESS
  JOURNAL are available upon request. In his spare
  time, Michael is completing a Ph.D at the
  University of Ottawa. Stay tuned for the return of
  Dr. Strangelove, coming to an Internet near you.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 08:40:19 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Edith Wu 
Subject:      Newspaper archives
 
My Library is studying a project to store newspaper articles in electronic
form and to make them searchable by users on network.  Both the text and
the related photos should be kept in the format as they appeared on the
papers.
 
I am sure that some VPIEJ-Lers may have heard or are involved in similar
projects. I would be happy if you could share your experiences with me. Your
could email to me direct if you wish.
 
Questions I have in mind are:
 
  - Do you store the articles in both text and image?  If yes, do you OCR
    the text and automatic index it?  Any clerks/librarians are hired to
    assign subject headings?
 
  - Or, do you store the articles only in image?
 
  - Manpower of the project
 
  - Output rate
 
  - Hardware and software
 
It would also be helpful if you could let me know telent addresses
some of these databases.
 
Thanks in advance.
 
 
Edith Wu
University Library
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
 
email: edith-wu@cuhk.hk
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 14:06:14 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         PATRICK WILKEN 
Subject:      Extract from Humanist: Project Muse (fwd)
 
From philos-l-request@liverpool.ac.uk Mon Mar  7 22:53:17 1994
Subject: extract from Humanist: Project Muse
 
> From: Susanna Pathak 
>
>                     PROJECT MUSE: A NEW VENTURE IN
>                   ELECTRONIC SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION
>
> In one of the first joint ventures of its kind, the Johns Hopkins
> University Press, the Milton S. Eisenhower Library, and Homewood Academic
> Computing have joined forces to launch Project Muse, an initiative that
> enables networked electronic access to the Press's scholarly journals.
> This collaboration draws the Johns Hopkins University community together
> to move scholarly communication into the electronic age and develop an
> economic model that addresses rising costs and diminishing budgets.
>
> The first phase of the project, completed in February 1994, is a freely
> accessible prototype consisting of current issues of Configurations, MLN
> (Modern Language Notes), and ELH (English Literary History).  The fully
> formatted text of these journals is now available on the Internet via
> online access to the library's server (http://muse.mse.jhu.edu). Features
> include subject, title, and author indexes; instant hypertext links to
> tables of contents, endnotes and illustrations; Boolean searches of text
> and tables of contents; and voice and textual annotations.  Several
> members of the scholarly community at Johns Hopkins have already used this
> resource, and one professor describes it as "an intelligent, incredibly
> easy system to use . . . an actual research tool."
>
> The prototype is accessed through a networked hypermedia information
> retrieval system known as the World Wide Web (WWW).  It can be viewed and
> searched using any of a number of freely available WWW readers, but runs
> optimally under the Mosaic reader developed by the National Center for
> Supercomputing Applications.  Users of Mosaic can annotate text, record
> paths taken during online sessions, download text for printing, and create
> "hot lists" of frequently accessed documents.  Mosaic readers are
> available for a variety of operating systems, including Unix, Mac, and
> Windows machines.  Users of the prototype may send comments and
> suggestions with the online form provided in the prototype or via regular
> e-mail (ejournal@jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu).
>
> The short-range goals of Project Muse, which the prototype enables us to
> achieve, are the creation of an easy-to-use electronic-journal environment
> with searching and multimedia features that cannot be duplicated in print,
> and the collection of data on amounts and types of usage for an access and
> costing model.  Long-range goals are to offer reasonably priced electronic
> journals to university libraries and to use online technology to make
> works of scholarship more widely available within individual university
> communities.
>
> If funding for capital costs can be raised, the project team aims to mount
> about forty of the Press's journals in math, the humanities, and the
> social sciences.  These issues will appear on a prepublication basis and
> will be available electronically a few weeks in advance of the printed
> version.  Beyond developing a prototype, Project Muse has enabled the
> university press, the library, and the computing center to engage in a
> meaningful dialogue about the current state of the scholarly communication
> process. We believe that this dialogue will not only influence the final
> appearance, price, and distribution method of the Press's online journals,
> but the shape of scholarly publishing in the information age.
>
> Susanna Pathak
> Project Muse Team
> Johns Hopkins
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 14:06:46 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Tosolini Paolo 
Subject:      Ordering books via email
 
I am looking for US bookstores that accept overseas orders
via email.
 
The subject of the books I am interesting in is computer science,
psychology and economics.
 
Should you know some reliable and good supplier, please email me
its name. I'll collect your answers and send to everybody interesting
in this survey.
 
Thanks for the support.
 
Paolo Tosolini, Italy
tosolini@uts340.univ.trieste.it
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 8 Mar 1994 14:07:10 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ron Zweig 
Subject:      Re: Newspaper archives
In-Reply-To:  <9403081344.AA18402@ccsg.tau.ac.il>
 
Edith Wu's posting on newspaper archives raises a number of interesting
problems, and I would be happy to share our experiences in creating a
digitized version of the archived holdings of an important newspaper.
 
However would Edith please clarify: are you interested in creating a
database of *current* newspapers - as they are published - or historical
holidngs (ie, retrospective database). Also, as you mentioned OCR, can we
presume that the newspapers in which you are interested are in English?
 
Ron Zweig
Dept. of Jewish History,
Tel Aviv University
Ramat Aviv, Israel 69-978
ron@ccsg.tau.ac.il
phone: 972-3-6409383 (work)
       972-2-332173 (home)
       972-2-345924 (fax)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Mar 1994 13:23:43 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:     This is gatewayed mail.  Warning:  Mail may not necessarily be
              returnable through this path.
From:         General Delivery 
Subject:      Re: Ordering books via email
 
Return-path: 
Received: from academia.swt.edu by academia.swt.edu (PMDF V4.2-15 #3941) id
 <01H9QD6JTS0WI53LMQ@academia.swt.edu>; Tue, 8 Mar 1994 15:04:18 CST
Date: Tue, 08 Mar 1994 14:36:06 -0600 (CST)
From: JE01@academia.swt.edu
Subject: RE: Ordering books via email
To: "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving, and Access"
 <"BITNET%\"VPIEJ-L@VTVM1.BITNET\""@academia.swt.edu>
Message-id: <01H9QF79LH6CI53LMQ@academia.swt.edu>
Organization: Southwest Texas State University
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT
 
Re: ordering books by e-mail
 
        I don't know of anyone just doing this, but Rosewell's Bookstore
in Nova Scotia is on a gopher up in NS (nstn?) and takes orders --
quite possibly by e-mail.  Also, you can telnet to books.com and order books.
 
Hope this helps.
 
Jill
je01@academia.swt.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Mar 1994 13:24:11 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Elliott Parker <3ZLUFUR@CMUVM.BITNET>
Organization: Central Michigan University
Subject:      Re: Newspaper archives
In-Reply-To:  Message of Tue,
              8 Mar 1994 08:40:19 EST from 
 
On Tue, 8 Mar 1994 08:40:19 EST you said:
>
>I am sure that some VPIEJ-Lers may have heard or are involved in similar
>projects. I would be happy if you could share your experiences with me. Your
>could email to me direct if you wish.
>
There is a list for news librarians.  They deal with these kind of
questions all the time: NEWSLIB@GIBBS.OIT.UNC.EDU.
   For more info on NEWSLIB, send email to LISTSERV (MAILSERV?;  it is
not the standard Listserv) with just INFO NEWSLIB in the body of
the msg.
 
========================================================================
Elliott Parker                   Bitnet: 3ZLUFUR@CMUVM
List Owner, SEASIA-L and CARR-L  Internet: 3zlufur@cmuvm.csv.cmich.edu
Department of Journalism         Less certain possibilities:
Central Michigan University        eparker@igc.apc.org
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 USA         CompuServe: 70701,520
Office tele: +1 517 774 3196       The WELL: eparker@well.sf.ca.us
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Mar 1994 13:25:05 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Edith Wu 
Subject:      Re; Newspapers Archives
 
(text extracted)
 
>However would Edith please clarify: are you interested in creating a
>database of *current* newspapers - as they are published - or historical
>holidngs (ie, retrospective database). Also, as you mentioned OCR, can we
>presume that the newspapers in which you are interested are in English?
>
>Ron Zweig
>Dept. of Jewish History,
>Tel Aviv University
>Ramat Aviv, Israel 69-978
>ron@ccsg.tau.ac.il
 
The project will cover only current newspapers of selected English and
Chinese titles.  I tried to generalize the issue in my earlier email.
Handling of Chinese titles is not easy.  In fact, I am looking for
satisfactory OCR software for **traditional** Chinese characters.
 
Anyway, I am interested in getting your advice or stories about projects of
similar type.
 
Edith Wu
University Library
Chinese University of Hong Kong
 
email: edith-wu@cuhk.hk
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Mar 1994 13:25:34 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         PATRICK WILKEN 
Subject:      Re: Ordering books via email
 
You might want to try:
 
Book Stacks Unlimited, Inc.
Cleveland, Ohio  USA
 
The On-Line Bookstore
 
Modem    : (216)861-0469
Internet : telnet books.com
 
They have a large range of books, +240 000, and have very
reasonable shipping rates ($3.95 total - no matter how many books you
order).
 
Cheers,
 
Patrick Wilken
x91007@pitvax.xx.rmit.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 9 Mar 1994 13:28:37 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Paula Presley 
Subject:      Re: Ordering books via email
In-Reply-To:  In reply to your message of TUE 08 MAR 1994 13:06:46 CST
 
We are not a bookstore, but we do accept orders from individuals or book
dealers for: The Sixteenth Century Journal (a scholarly quarterly), the
monographs published by The Sixteenth Century Publishers, and some of
the books published by The Thomas Jefferson University Presss (some of
TJUP's books are distributed through University Publishing Associates in
Lanham, Maryland, and we cannot receive orders for those titles,
however).
 
For more informtion, write to me or to Robert Schnucker, at:
SS18%nemomus@academic.nemostate.edu.
 
Paula Presley
 
Assoc. Editor, The Thomas Jefferson University Press
Copy Editor, The Sixteenth Century Journal
 
Northeast Missouri State University
McClain Hall 111L
Kirksville, MO 63501
(816) 785-4525  FAX  (816) 785-4181
Bitnet: AD15@NEMOMUS  Internet: AD15%NEMOMUS@Academic.NEMOState.EDU
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 10 Mar 1994 08:28:10 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Lee Jaffe 
Subject:      Re: Ordering books via email
 
 
 
                           Moe's Books
                       2476 Telegraph Ave
                       Berkeley, CA   94704
 
>From moesbooks@delphi.com:
 
We have set up an on-line new and used bookstore service on Delphi,
issuing specialized catalogs and lists, as well as doing booksearches
for hard-to-find titles. We have a huge stock of recent and older
titles and will search our store for anything you want.
 
Moe's Books is located in the heart of Berkeley, four blocks from
the University and half a block from People's Park. We've been around
for over 25 years (our old store can be seen in "The Graduate") and
we keep getting bigger. We carry some new books, but we are primarily
a used book store, one of the largest bookstores of this kind in the
world.
 
We have five floors filled with books -- new, used, out-of-print, rare,
antiquarian, remainders, and imported titles.
 
More Moe's, located on our fourth floor, is our art and antiquarian
shop, specializing in photography, art monographs, Asian art,
architecture, fine press books, rare children's books, and hard-to-find
imported titles.
 
We are issuing catalogs of the books in More Moe's which we're putting
on-line in databases on Delphi and updating regularly.  We will also
e-mail the catalogs to anybody who requests them.
 
We also offer an on-line booksearch. With a half million books in
stock, we are never going to catalog everything.
 
If there are things you are looking for, let us know. It doesn't
have to be rare or out-of-print -- we get books in every day and
might have that recent (but too darned expensive) book you
wanted, at a considerable discount.
 
If we don't have what you are looking for, we'll keep you on file
and keep searching.  We'll also post your wants on Internet, with
a group of international booksellers exchanging want lists as well.
 
To ask about our inventory, send us a want list, details on how
to order books, or just to chat, you can contact us here on Delphi,
where we can be e-mailed as MOESBOOKS or through Internet as
moesbooks@delphi.com.   We check our messages every day.
 
***************************************************************
 
"The Pogo Stepmother Goose," by Walt Kelly (Simon and Schuster,
1954). One of several Pogo books currently in stock. Dedicated to
"Lewis Carroll and the Children," this is a particularly charming
Pogo, with strips that take off from Mother Goose rhymes. Price:
22.50 (out of print, first printing).
 
"New Illustrated Self-Instructor in Phrenology and Physiology
With Over One Hundred Engravings Together With The Chart and
Character of Mrs Crawford, As Marked by O. S. Fowler," by O. S.
and L. N. Fowler (Wells, 1868). Learn to read the bumps on your
head to discover the true measure of you approbativeness,
alimentiveness, ideality, eventuality, and inhabitiveness. This
book is a bit worn, but think of all the new things you'll be
able to surprise your friends with at parties! Price: $15.
 
"Telegraph 3 A.M.: The Street People of Telegraph Avenue" by
Richard Misrach, Cornucopia Press (1974). We are not quoting this
just because a photograph of our old store is used as the books
frontispiece.... This is a different approach for Misrach, if you
only know him from his landscapes. There are sixty-five black and
white portraits of Telegraph Avenue and the street people of
Berkeley, and the reproductions sparkle. We recently found a
cache of these in a local storage space.  Price: $15. (We had
been getting $65 a copy for this previously darned scare
book....)
 
"Atget: Paris," introduction by Laure Beaumont-Maillet (Hazen,
1992). Major recent reviews from Time, Newsweek, and assorted
fine arts magazines. A little late -- the book is no longer
available. Guess who has the last ten copies on the face of the
earth? 780 pages long, 840 photographs, with several maps of the
city. A major look at this important photographer. Just flipping
through it is an overwhelming experience. Paper. Price: $49.50
(list $55).
 
"The Art of Maurice Sendak," by Selma G. Landes (Abrams, 1980).
Original edition of this monograph on the hugely popular and
influential children's book illustrator. Filled with beautiful
color illustrations, drawings, scary monsters, and surprises.
Cloth. Price: $75 (out of print).
 
"A Coptic Dictionary," compiled by W. E. Crum (Oxford, 1962) "A
Coptic Dictionary"? Like there are others available?? The
much-too modest Dr. Crum, who admits on the title page to needing
the help of "many scholars" to complete his work, has put
together a 950 page dictionary with references to Greek and
Arabic words and covering all known dialects of Coptic. You must
recall the glowing review in "Byzantinishe Zeitschrift" (you
remember -- where Henstenberg referred to it as "Ein Werk das ...
zu den Standardleistungen gezahlt werden wird") and now this fine
book is just a modem call away! Cloth. Price: $120 (list $175).
 
"Winchester: An American Legend," by R.L. Wilson (Random House,
1991). Comprehensive history of the American gunsmith, with
hundreds of color photos and an appendix -- a detailed book for
the serious collector. Cloth. Price: $40 (list $65).
 
"Atlas of the Greek World," by Peter Levi (Facts on File, 1985).
A great reference book with color maps, photos, and a
straight-forward but detailed text, covering the history of
Classical Greece. Cloth. Price: $30 (list $45).
 
"Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament,"
edited by James B. Pritchard (Princeton, 1969). All of the
well-known texts are to be found, such as the Code of Hammurabi,
Gilgamesh, and the Babylonian story of the Creation. You'll also
find Egyptian hymns to the Sun, sections on Akkadian myths,
Hittite treaties, Aramaic papyri, Palestinian inscriptions,
Sumerian hymns, Egyptian oracles and dozens of other equally
interesting subjects. With 700 pages of double-columned text and
the work of the greatest names in the field, this is an
invaluable book for the scholar. For the rest of us, it is a
glimpse into a fascinating past and a book to conjure with.
Cloth. Price: $165 (out of print in cloth).
 
"Palaces of Vienna," by Wolfgang Kraus and Peter Muller (Vendome
Press, 1993). A survey in detailed color photographs of several
private aristocratic residences built in or near the Hapsburg
capital. A source of great designing tips if you find yourself
unable to figure out what to do with your monumental bronze
sculptures or two ton crystal chandeliers. Cloth. Price: $37.50
(list $60).
 
"The Forgotten Village," by John Steinbeck (Viking, 1941). A
first edition of this unusual book. Illustrated with 136
photographs from the film of the same name, reproduced by
photogravure. A very nice copy with dust jacket. Price: $45 (out
of print).
 
"Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City," by Carolyn
Tate (Univ. of Texas, 1992). Maps, charts, glyphs, floorplans,
extensive text -- everything you need to build your own your own
Maya ruin except for the huge carved stones. Cloth. Price: $24
(list $40).
 
"The Bridge: A Poem by Hart Crane," (Limited Editions Club,
1981). Limited Editions Club has a reputation matching text to
illustrations and using the finest in materials to create
beautiful books worth collecting. In this case, Crane's poem and
Richard Benson's superb photographs meet, producing a book that
is rewarding on all levels. Limited to 2000 copies and signed by
the photographer. Cloth, with slipcase. Price: $100.
 
"The World Is Round," by Gertrude Stein (Arion Press, 1986). A
special illustrated edition of Stein's children's book, in the
shape of a circle. This is a boxed set which includes the "round"
copy of the book, a square companion volume called "The World is
Not Flat" (which contains the publishing history of the book),
and a balloon. Personally, I think all books should come with a
balloon.... Price: $200. (We also have a copy of the second
printing of the original 1939 edition, unfortunately rectangular,
for $45.)
 
"Past Worlds: The Times Atlas of Archeology," (Hammond, 1988).
This book covers all time periods of all areas of the globe.
Heavily illustrated with maps, charts, examples of contemporary
art and architecture. This book is one of our best sellers.
Price: 42.50 (list $85)
 
"Bugs Bunny: Fifty Years and Only One Grey Hare" What more do you
need to know? The first major look at an icon of American
culture. Price: $10 (list $20).
 
"American Independents: Eighteen Color Photographers,"
(Abbeville, 1987). Portfolios of, and commentaries on the recent
color work by contemporary masters, including Stephen Shore,
William Eggleston, Richard Misrach, and Joel Meyerowitz. Price:
$30 (list $50).
 
"Annie on Camera," text by Anne H. Hoy, Abbeville (1982). Pretty
much the flip side of the above book. Nobody believes me, but I
think this is going to be worth a fortune some day. The producer
of the major John Huston bomb "Annie" decided to hire nine of the
finest photographers to plug the film with a major show of photos
of the making of the movie. Instead of taking pictures of
happy-go-lucky child actors dancing around, they got William
Eggleston taking pictures of light switches, Joel Meyerowitz
shooting a near-by dump, and Garry Winogrand's black and white
interpretation of John Huston watching TV. Hard to find, worth
the search. Paper. Price: $10.
 
"Black Tradition in American Dance," by Richard A. Long (Rizzoli,
1989). Everything from minstrel shows to Alvin Ailey. Mostly
color, with performance photographs, portraits of the
choreographers, and reproductions of publicity posters. Price;
$15 (list $30).
 
"Atlas of The Crusades," edited by Jonathan Riley-Smith (Times
Books Of London, 1990). 192 pages packed with full-color maps
detailing the Crusades and the waxing and waning of Arabic
civilizations. Includes excerpts from contemporary accounts of
the Crusades, along with modern commentary. Cloth. Price: $20
(list: $40).
 
"Random House Encyclopedia," edited by James Mitchell (3rd ed,
1990). The latest edition of this comprehensive one-volume
encyclopedia. They proudly claim more than 11,000 color
illustrations and 3 million words. I'm sure they are all there --
I'm not going to count them. Cloth. Price: $50 (list: $130).
 
"Civilization of the Goddess: The World of Old Europe," by Marija
Gimbutas (Harper, 1991). A detailed, fully illustrated
description of artifacts from goddess-worshipping cultures in
prehistoric Europe. 529 pages with an enormous number of line
drawings, as well as black and white and color plates. Another
fast selling item around here. Paper. Price: $13 (list: $27).
 
"Aztecs," by Eduardo Matos Moctezuma (Rizzoli, 1989). A
beautifully illustrated description of Aztec culture, artifacts
and archaeological sites. Another in Rizzoli's magnificent series
on ancient cultures and one of the best. 240 illustrations, 112
in color, most of them full-page, covering Solar Disks, masks,
the Codex Florentinus, and Aztec temples. Cloth. Price: $40
(list: $75).
 
"The Iliad of Homer," translated by Robert Fagles (Viking, 1990).
This very readable and highly regarded new translation of the
Trojan War epic is thrilling, heroic, tense, majestic -- a
classic version of one of the cornerstones of world literature.
Cloth. Price: $13.
 
"Facts On File Encyclopedia Of The 20th Century," edited by John
Drexell (1991). An A-Z guide to important people, places, events
and ideas that have shaped our contemporary world. A perfect
one-volume reference guide. We'll give you a 10% discount if you
are actually listed in this book! Cloth. Price: $40 (list: $80).
 
"Bloomsbury Guide To Women's Literature," edited by Claire Buck
(1992). From Sappho to Jeanette Winterson, women writers through
the ages and throughout the world. Cloth. Price: $17.50 (list:
$35).
 
"The Random House Dictionary of the English Language," second
edition. I slipped this one in towards the end to reward anybody
who read this far without being overwhelmed by my magical and
occasionally radiant descriptions. This is the current edition of
this huge dictionary -- 2500 pages with 315,00 entries. We have a
very limited number of copies in perfect shape and, considering
the scholastic gift-buying madness in Berkeley, they will not
last long. Price: $50 (list, $90).
 
"The Wizard Of Oz," condensed from the story by L. Frank Baum
(Jelly Bean Press, 1991). A simple and slightly different take on
the well-known story, for younger readers. Beautifully
illustrated by Charles Santore. Cloth. Price: $8 (list: $16).
 
"Early Tales and Sketches" by Mark Twain, University of
California Press (1975).  Over 450 early works by Twain from the
definitive (and exhaustive) UC Press edition of "The Works of
Mark Twain."  Two thirds of the sketches have never been
reprinted before.  Two volumes, cloth.  Price: $50 (list $100).
 
"A History of Technology," edited by Charles Singer, E. J.
Holmyard, A. R. Hall, and Trevor I Williams, Oxford (1957).  A
fine set, with hundreds of line drawings, dozens of black and
white plates per volume, and contributions by some of the
greatest names in science and history writing.  Everything you
need to know about technology from the earliest times to the late
nineteenth century.  Five volumes, cloth.  Price: 375 (list
$625).
 
"The Way of the Animal Powers" by Joseph Campbell, Alfred Van der
Marck / Harper & Row (1983).  This is volume one of a proposed
series he did not live to complete.  Available in a flimsy three
volume paperback set now, this cloth copy is long out of print.
Price: $75.
 
"The Healing Hand: Man and Wound in the Ancient World" by Guido
Majno, Harvard (1975).  A personal favorite, this book is a
history of the treatment of wounds, covering Mesopotamia, Egypt,
Greece, China, India, and Rome, ending with a chapter on Galen.
It includes step-by-step instruction on the basic procedures of
Hippocratic wound care and how to use an Eciton burchelli ant to
close the edges of a wound.  Cloth, no dust jacket.  Price $21
(out of print in cloth).
 
"Image Tibet" by Charles Berger, Scrimshaw Press (1973).  A very
strange book, with thirty three-color silkscreened printed
photographs of the Tibetan Buddhist Refugee Settlement in India.
The combination of traditional scenes and electric colors will
stop you in your tracks.  Cloth, limited to 5000 copies.  Price:
$25 (out of print).
 
"Gods of Earth and Heaven" by Joel-Peter Witkin, Twelvetrees
Press (1989).  The first edition, limited to five thousand
copies.  This is one of one hundred signed boxed copies.  (OK, so
his signature looks like some kid got into your photo book
collection with a ball point pen, but the box is nice.)
Everything you've come to expect from Witkin, from severed heads
to swans.  Cloth.  Price: $150.
 
"Life Among the Apaches" by John C. Cremony, A. Roman & Company
(1868).  An account by a US Boundary Commission interpreter of
his dealings with the Apaches and other tribes.  Inscribed by the
author.  Cloth.  Price: $250.
 
"The Adventures of Phobe Zeit-Geist" by Micheal O'Donoghue and
Frank Springer, Grove Press (1968).  Everything you could ever
want in the way of a magnificently aimless graphic novel.  If you
know it, you'll want it.  If you don't know it, you might be
better off....  Cloth.  Price: $10 (out of print).
 
"Classical Dances and Costumes of India" by Kay Ambrose, Adam and
Charles Black (1957).  Illustrated with hundreds of drawings,
diagrams, and photographs, this amazing book covers every facet
of India dance, with special reference to famed dancer Ram Gopal.
Cloth.  Price: $20.
 
"The Eclectic Abecdarium" by Edward Gorey, Adama Books (1983).
Small format, tiny illustrations (about the length of the joint
of your index finger), wherein you are instructed to pick up
loose crumbs with your thumbs and warned against eating library
paste.  Boards.  Price $6.50 (out of print)
 
"Blueprints" by Christopher Gray, Simon and Schuster (1981).  A
very large format paperback, with giant fold-out blueprints of
various unusual structures.  Just the thing if you were planning
on building your own Statue of Liberty, Chrysler Building, or
Hoover Dam.  Also includes Lucy The Margate Elephant, The Wright
Brother's Kitty Hawk, and the original McDonald's.  The cover of
this copy is a little sun-damaged, but is otherwise intact and in
good condition.  Price: $12. (out of print).
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 11 Mar 1994 08:42:11 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Todd A. Jacobs" 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      "Paperback" Electronic Book Series
 
JACOBS PUBLISHING, LTD
13929 Castle Blvd. #24
Silver Spring, MD 20904-4995
 
 
                   Electronic Books Go "Paperback"
 
                  Publisher Markets Low-Cost E-Books
 
 
For Immediate Release
Thursday, March 10, 1994
 
Contact: Todd A. Jacobs
         Jacobs Publishing, LTD
         202-388-9742
 
Silver Spring--recent breakthrough in e-publishing technology has
prompted one prominent e-publisher to unveil plans for a new line of
low-cost electronic books.  Most e- books currently available cost
$19.95 to upwards of $40.  Jacobs Publishing has positioned itself as
a "paperback" e- publisher by pricing its forthcoming books at $5.95
apiece. These books will be widely available on services such as
Internet, Compuserve, and America Online in as little as eight to
twelve weeks.
 
At the heart of this technological breakthrough lie two
special programs:
 
  *  Hyperion SoftWord's Orpheus.  Orpheus is a hypertext authoring
  system which creates beautifully designed electronic books, and
  features an easy to use mouse interface, as well as brilliant graphics
  capabilities.
 
  *  SoftLock, Inc.'s SoftLock Document Toolkit.  SoftLock's suite of
  publishers' tools makes commercial sales of electronic novels truly
  viable for the first time through the use of workstation-specific
  passwords that "unlock" the novel.  Their services include a 24-hour
  toll free number where readers can instantly purchase electronic
  books by credit card.
 
"What we offer is unique," says publisher Todd Jacobs.  "Our books are
online, so they can be purchased without ever leaving your home.  You
can read the first chapter without paying a cent.  Then, if you like
what you see, you can call our toll-free number and purchase your
password in a matter of minutes.  Good books, and instant
gratification -- what more could anyone ask?"
 
Initially, authors seem to be approaching electronic publishing
cautiously.  Mr. Jacobs explains: "It's a new market.  The technology
and marketing approach are so revolutionary that people are naturally
concerned.  To offset this, we are offering royalty rates that
consistently exceed those offered by hardcopy publishers.  We expect
to win the trust and loyalty of a large number of new and established
writers with our higher royalty rates, faster publication schedules,
and streamlined contact procedures."
 
The production goals include a slow ramp-up during the next three to
six months, with the eventual aim of adding one title a week to the
lineup.  How can a small publishing house maintain such a pace?  "By
keeping our fingers on the pulse of today's technology, and then
staying one step ahead," says Mr. Jacobs, smiling.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Mar 1994 08:19:26 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Georg Fuellen 
Organization: Math Madhouse Bielefeld
Subject:      Re: Ordering books via email
 
In article <9403081527.AA00217@uts340.Univ.Trieste.It>, Tosolini Paolo
 writes:
|> I am looking for US bookstores that accept overseas orders
|> via email.
|>
|> The subject of the books I am interesting in is computer science,
|> psychology and economics.
|>
|> Should you know some reliable and good supplier, please email me
|> its name. I'll collect your answers and send to everybody interesting
|> in this survey.
|>
|> Thanks for the support.
|>
|> Paolo Tosolini, Italy
|> tosolini@uts340.univ.trieste.it
 
as far as I know, quanbook@world.std.com accepts overseas orders.
 
if you've got a hypertext browser (e.g. Mosaic) , you can even fill
order forms electronically, starting at
 
http://www.cs.cmu.edu:8001/Web/booksellers.html
 
  georg
fuellen@MIT.EDU
fuellen@Mathematik.Uni-Bielefeld.DE
The convex hull of all disclaimers made on usenet last year applies to this
mess
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Mar 1994 08:19:44 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         phil-preprints-admin@phil-preprints.L.chiba-u.ac.jp
Subject:      News from the IPPE (11 Mar 94)
 
====================================================
International Philosophical Preprint Exchange Update
==================================================== Fri 11 Mar 1994
 
Many of you have inquired as to the easiest way to view the contents of
the IPPE, which currently includes: a large collection of preprints
covering every area of philosophy; the abstracts, tables of contents,
and editorial summaries of the journals and book series in our Journals,
Books, and Conferences directory; and which will soon include a
Dialogues directory.
 
I personally prefer our graphic illustration of the IPPE,
Map_of_the_IPPE, although more textually minded philosophers will prefer
our INDEX file.  Both are updated daily and are available on the IPPE in
our main directory.
 
 
---------------
Map_of_the_IPPE
---------------
This is a map of the directory structure of the IPPE.  For information
on what each directory contains, see the file INDEX (or feel free to
browse).
 
The International Philosophical Preprint Exchange -- directory map
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is a map of the directory structure of the IPPE.  For information
on what each directory contains, see the file INDEX (or feel free to browse).
 
pub
 |
 +- Journals_Books_and_Conferences
 |   |
 |   +- Philosophy_of_the_Social_Sciences
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- 1994.v24n1
 |   |   +- 1994.v24n3
 |   |
 |   +- Poznan_Studies_in_Philosophy_of_Sciences_and_Humanities
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- 1990.v18.Studies_on_Mario_Bunge,s_Treatise
 |   |   +- 1991.v23.Ethical_Dimensions_of_Legal_Theory
 |   |   +- 1991.v24.Advances_in_Scientific_Philosophy
 |   |   +- 1992.v25.Idealization_III--Approximation_and_Truth
 |   |   +- 1993.v28.Polish_Scientific_Philosophy
 |   |   +- 1993.v31.Creativity_and_Consciousness
 |   |   +- 1993.v33.Social_System,_Rationality,_and_Revolution
 |   |   +- 1993.v35.Empirical_Logic_and_Public_Debate
 |   |   +- Information
 |   |
 |   +- Radical_Philosophy
 |       |
 |       +- 1994.RP66
 |
 +- info
 +- preprints
 |   |
 |   +- Aesthetics
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- van_Gerwen.Kants_Regulative_Principle_of_Aesthetic_Excellence
 |   |
 |   +- Epistemology
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Berkeley.Knowhow
 |   |   +- Fuller.Constitutively_Social_Character_of_Expertise
 |   |   +-
 Heylighen.Fitness:Evolutionary_Basis_of_Cognitive_Complexity_Reduction
 |   |   +- Pierson.Epistemic_Authority_of_Expertise
 |   |
 |   +- Ethics
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Austen.Bradley_and_Feminist_Ethics
 |   |   +- Donovan.Boundaries_of_Ethical_Formalism
 |   |   +- Donovan.Kants_Rational_Consequentialism
 |   |   +- Ferguson.Feminist_Communities_and_Moral_Revolution
 |   |   +- Sayers.Moral_Values_and_Progress
 |   |   +- Van_Liedekerke.Time,_Preference,_Time_Preference
 |   |
 |   +- History_of_Phil
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Elkatip.Individuation_and_Scotus
 |   |
 |   +- Logic
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Akman_and_Pakkan.Hypersolver-A_graph-based_tool
 |   |   +- Chaitin.Randomness_and_Complexity_in_Pure_Mathematics
 |   |   +- Ersan_and_Akman.Situated_Modeling_of_Epistemic_Puzzles
 |   |   +- Pakkan_and_Akman.Issues_in_Commonsense_Set_Theory
 |   |   +- Tin_and_Akman.Computational_Situation_Theory
 |   |   +- Tin_and_Akman.The_Logic_of_Counteractions
 |   |
 |   +- Metaphysics
 |   +- Phil_of_Language
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Nowak.Ajdukiewicz_Chomsky_and_the_status_of_the_Theory_of_Language
 |   |   +- Palma.On_a_propensity_to_interpret
 |   |   +- Porter.Counter-performative_Speech_Acts
 |   |   +- Reiner.Logical_form_of_action_sentences
 |   |
 |   +- Phil_of_Mind
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Harnad.Artificial_Life:Synthetic_vs_Virtual
 |   |   +- Harnad.Correlations_are_just_the_Cheshire_Cats_Grin
 |   |   +- Harnad.Does_the_Mind_Piggyback_on_Robotic_and_Symbolic_Capacity
 |   |   +- Harnad.Grounding_Symbols_in_the_Analog_World_with_Neural_Nets
 |   |   +- Harnad.Origin_of_Words
 |   |   +- Harnad.Papers
 |   |   +- Harnad.Symbol_Grounding_is_an_Empirical_Problem
 |   |   +- Hayes_et_al.Virtual_Symposium_on_Virtual_Mind
 |   |   +- Lupton.Simplicity_and_Misrepresentation
 |   |   +- Mulhauser.Chaos_and_Computability_in_Philosophy_of_Mind
 |   |   +- Mulhauser.Materialism_and_Quantum_Measurement
 |   |   +- Pearce.Lucid_Dreamworlds
 |   |   +- Pindor.Comments_on_the_Symbol_Grounding_Problem
 |   |
 |   +- Phil_of_Religion
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Dastagir.Japanese_Buddhism--Impact_on_Japanese_Culture
 |   |   +- Donovan.Faith_and_Intellectual_Fairness
 |   |
 |   +- Phil_of_Science
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Davson-Galle.Weak_Neo-Meilandian_Relativism
 |   |   +- Fuller.Can_Science_Studies_be_Spoken_in_a_Civil_Tongue
 |   |   +- Gale.Theories
 |   |   +- Gerson.A_Classification_of_Heuristics
 |   |   +- Holt_and_Holt.On_Defining_Chaos
 |   |   +- Korb.Infinitely_Many_Resolutions_of_Hempels_Paradox
 |   |   +- Lieberman.Tobacco_Smoke_and_Social_Constructivism
 |   |   +- McReynolds.Between_Technology_and_Technique
 |   |   +- Miller.Evolutionary_Unity_of_Science
 |   |   +- Pierson_and_Reiner.Experimental_argument_for_realism
 |   |
 |   +- Political_Phil
 |   |   |
 |   |   +- Crawford.Computer-assisted_Crises
 |   |   +- Morgenstern.Industrial_Democracy_and_Worker
 |   |
 |   +- other
 |       |
 |       +- Gilbert.Feminism,_Argumentation_&_Coalesence
 |       +- Riskin.The_Structures_of_Coming_to_Knowledge
 |
 +- submissions
 
 
-----------------------------------------------------------
Accessing the International Philosophical Preprint Exchange
-----------------------------------------------------------
By gopher: "gopher apa.oxy.edu" or "gopher kasey.umkc.edu".
By ftp:    "ftp Phil-Preprints.L.Chiba-U.ac.jp", or
           "ftp mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu".
By email:  "mail phil-preprints-service@Phil-Preprints.L.Chiba-U.ac.jp".
By www:    "http://csmaclab-www.uchicago.edu/philosophyProject/philos.html"
 
To place a paper or comment on the IPPE: see pub/submissions/README.
If you have questions: send mail to .
 
 
 
Carolyn L Burke
Administrator, IPPE
======================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Mar 1994 08:20:06 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Pieter van der Walt BIB 308 
Organization: Rand Afrikaans University
Subject:      Indexing of electronic journals
 
To all editors of electronic scholarly electronic journals:
Please send me a short description of your journal and in which
indexing or abstracting service your journal is indexed or abstracted.
 
(This is for a research paper on the current state of accessiblity of
electronic journals)
 
Thanks in advance
 
Pieter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. P.W.van der Walt                     Internet:PVDW@info.rau.ac.za
Library: Information Technology          Tel: 27(11)489-2166
Rand Afrikaans University                Fax: 27(11)726-7723
Aucklandpark                             Telex: 424526SA
2006
Republic of South Africa
----------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 14 Mar 1994 08:21:12 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         KING@NIJENRODE.NL
Subject:      Hello from a new subscriber, need some help
 
Hello
 
I am a student at Nijenrode University, The Netherlands Business School.  I
am working on a end of study thesis project focussing on electonic
publishing of direct mail, retail catalogs.  I am looking for information
on how to publish dynamic, interactive catalogs through on-line networks
and CD ROM.  The RR Donnely consortia of retail catalogs on CD ROM is
particularly interesting.
 
Could anyone offer me advice on how to research this topic?
 
Thank You,
 
Scott King, ( King@nijenrode.nl)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 16 Mar 1994 16:41:54 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Rob Brown <70742.1163@CompuServe.COM>
Subject:      SGML markup editors
 
Hi everyone,
 
I am new to this mailing list and I'm looking for some information on SGML
markup options. This is also my first attempt at accessing an INTERNET
discussion list from Compuserve, so if I make any mistakes please let me know.
 
I am currently developing a set of tools that will allow people to construct
electronic journals and/or hypertext systems using SGML. I can do all sorts of
things with the text once it is marked up, however I'd like to include some form
of support for marking up raw ASCII text.
 
I'm aware of the companies Arbortext and Softquad but have not seen their
products. Has anyone worked with either of these or any other editor that was
effective? I have also heard of a public domain markup tool provided by the US
government (I can't locate its name) where you pay for product support but not
the actual product. Is this correct information and does anyone know where I can
find out more?
 
Thanks in advance,
Rob Brown
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 17 Mar 1994 08:15:27 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "GEORG.J. ANKER" 
Organization: University of Innsbruck, Austria
Subject:      Re: SGML markup editors
 
Rob Brown wrote ...
> I am currently developing a set of tools that will allow people to
construct
> electronic journals and/or hypertext systems using SGML. I can do
all sorts of
> things with the text once it is marked up, however I'd like to
include some form
> of support for marking up raw ASCII text.
 
I have tried out some - for MS-Windows you could use htmlasst. You
should find the zipped version via archie. Let me know what you are
planning to do exactly (e-mail, as this is not the list to discuss
such things), I also need this kind of tools for my information
providers.
 
Thanks in advance
 
Georg
 
======================================
Georg J. Anker
EDV-Zentrum der Universitaet Innsbruck
University of Innsbruck Computing Services
Technikerstr. 13
A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria
______________________________________
Tel.: (+43 512) 218 4069 Fax: 218 4065
E-Mail: Georg.J.Anker@uibk.ac.at
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 17 Mar 1994 14:27:15 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Hans Roes 
Organization: Tilburg University Library, Netherlands
Subject:      Re: SGML markup editors
In-Reply-To:  Rob's message of Wed, 16 Mar 1994 16:41:54 EST
 
In <940316211345_70742.1163_CHG74-1@CompuServe.COM> Rob writes:
 
> Hi everyone,
>
> I am new to this mailing list and I'm looking for some information on SGML
> markup options. This is also my first attempt at accessing an INTERNET
> discussion list from Compuserve, so if I make any mistakes please let me
know.
 
Are you aware of the newsgroup comp.text.sgml ? Lots of SGML wizards over
there.
 
Regards,
 
 
 
Hans Roes                       Internet                H.Roes@kub.nl
Tilburg University Library      Phone                   +31 13 662326/2121
Postbox 90153                   Fax                     +31 13 663370
5000 LE Tilburg                 Netherlands
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 18 Mar 1994 08:43:31 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Allen Renear 
Subject:      Re: SGML markup editors
 
 
As well as reading and querying comp.text.sgml, anyone beginning
SGML-based publishing should also take a look at the two SGML ftp
archives:
            sgml1.ex.ac.uk  (Exeter)
            ifi.uio.no      (Erik Naggum)
 
See particularly the Cover & Barnard annotated bibliography -- perhaps
no longer recent enough to be definitive, but still very useful.
 
And don't miss the new version (first publicly published I think)
of the TEI Text Encoding Guidelines, expected out in just a few weeks.
 
-- allen
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 21 Mar 1994 08:22:20 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ron Zweig 
Subject:      Re: Re; Newspapers Archives
In-Reply-To:  <9403091825.AA02294@ccsg.tau.ac.il>
 
Edith Wu asked about some of the problems associated with digitizing
newspaper archives. Here is a partial checklist of the major problems
such a project will have to resolve. The list is based on experience
in the retrospective scanning of historical newspapers.
 
Any newspaper digitization project that deals with current issues of
newspapers can avoid these problems (but will face different ones) by
working with the typesetting tapes generated in the printing process,
rather than computerizing the printed copies of the paper. But assuming
that that isnt possible, then:
 
(i) is the print quality/newsprint quality sufficient to allow for OCR?
 
(ii) does OCR exist for Chinese? The best, trainable programs that I am
aware of have  character memory banks of 200-300 characters. This is
hardly enough for an intelligent Chinese newspaper, even if all the type
was in the same font (which it wont be).
 
(iii) look carefully at a page of newsprint. The graphical elements of
the page - layout, headlines of varying sizes, column structure,
pictures, advertisements, etc - are all features that a decent *archival
quality* digitized copy should preserve. But all of this will be lost in
OCR. Therefore, the best solution is to preserve both the image *and* the
text files generated by OCR. These can be linked so one gets the benefit
of the full image plus the text searching possibilities of the ascii files.
(This linkage requires special, and expensive, software.)
 
(iv) segmentation: the column-based layout of newspapers makes OCR a
complicated process. There are various possible solutions here. I hope
soon to be able to report on the efficacy of one solution on the basis of
tests we are currently conducting.
 
(v) as mentioned in my first posting in reply to Edith, the storage
requirements of a text file+image file solution are not to be sneezed at.
At a very rough guess, you will be able to get circa 1,000 pages of
newsprint (as text and images) onto a CDROM. For any reasonably-sized
newspaper, that means a cdrom every few months. (One avenue to improve
this situation: the resolution required for OCR is much higher than the
resolution required for displaying readable images on a screen. Adjusting
resolution from 300 or 400 dpi to 150-200 dpi can save an immense amount
of storage space.
 
I hope this over-long posting will help define some of the issues that
Edith will have to deal with in her project. Good luck!
 
Ron Zweig
Tel Aviv University
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 21 Mar 1994 08:23:27 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Re: Recent discussions
In-Reply-To:  <9401311835.AA12552@a.cni.org> from "Guedon Jean-Claude" at Jan
              31, 94 01:10:42 pm
 
Jean Claude -- I am working on the 4th edition of the E-JOURNAL
Directory...It's my practice to use in the frontmatter a few pieces
of interest. This year I have a reprint from Geoff Nunberg, XEROX
PARC, on the place of books in the culture..quite good.  Also a
bibliography.
 
I am pondering the "categories" of e-pubs we are developing and how
they don't fit the old definitions of journals very tidily.  I am
thinking/wondering whether I should just merge the categories of
journals and newsletters since sometimes I can't tell what is what.
When you add the preprint services, then it gets really murky....
 
Michael Strangelove said I should ask you if you had written some
comparative study about early days of serials vs. early days of e-
serials.  Have you?  Or this leads me to ask if you have written
anything else that relates to the topic of the development of e-
journals. The Manitoba paper comes to mind right away, and I would
sure be willing to "reprint" that and attribute the Manitoba FTP
site or whatever they develop....
 
Our directory gets produced during April, preferably early part,
and hits the streets sometime in May.  Surely by then Manitoba will
have something.  If we are the paper publisher, I will only be
competing with our own publication, and I don't mind!
 
What do you think?
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Mar 1994 08:07:01 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Pieter van der Walt BIB 308 
Organization: Rand Afrikaans University
Subject:      European Conferences 1994
 
Does anybody now of any Library and Information Science related
Conferences taking place in Europe in September of this year?
Please let me know ASAP.
 
Thanks in advance
 
Pieter
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. P.W.van der Walt                     Internet:PVDW@info.rau.ac.za
Library: Information Technology          Tel: 27(11)489-2166
Rand Afrikaans University                Fax: 27(11)726-7723
Aucklandpark                             Telex: 424526SA
2006
Republic of South Africa
----------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Mar 1994 13:53:00 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Todd A. Jacobs" 
Organization: Clark Internet Services, Inc., Ellicott City, MD USA
Subject:      New Market
 
JACOBS PUBLISHING, LTD: 13929 Castle Blvd. #24, Silver Spring MD
20904-4995.  Internet: tjacobs@clark.net, Voice: (202) 388-9742,
BBS/Fax: (301) 890-0686.
 
Publishes electronic novels from unagented writers.  Pays 5-20%
royalty on retail price.  Publishes book an average of 4 weeks after
manuscript is accepted.  Simultaneous submissions OK.  Reports in 3
weeks on queries; 6-8 weeks on mss.
 
Non-fiction: animals, anthropology, archaeology, artwork, business,
computers, cooking, economics, electronics, government, how-to,
humor, money/finance, politics, psychology, recreation, science,
technical, and more.  Query at query@epub.clark.net or submit
outline/synopsis with sample chapter to mss@epub.clark.net.
Unsolicited mss welcome.
 
Non-fiction tips: "Fact-filled doesn't mean dull.  Entertain as well
as enlighten."
 
Fiction: adventure, erotica, experimental, fantasy, horror, humor,
juvenile, mystery, picture books, plays, romance, science fiction,
short story collections, suspense, young adult.  Query at
query@epub.clark.net or submit outline/synopsis with sample chapter
to mss@epub.clark.net.  Unsolicited mss welcome.
 
Poetry: query or submit complete mss.
 
TIPS: Electronic submissions should be single-spaced plain vanilla
ASCII with double spaces between paragraphs; query before using any
other format.  Use margins of 5-75.  Use spell-checking and
grammer-checking programs; mss which have obviously not been
proof-read will be rejected without comment.
 
--
Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Mar 1994 14:45:43 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Chuck Bacon 
Subject:      Re: New Market
In-Reply-To:  <199403221900.OAA04607@helix.nih.gov>
 
Appropriate use?
 
On Tue, 22 Mar 1994, Todd A. Jacobs wrote:
 
> JACOBS PUBLISHING, LTD: 13929 Castle Blvd. #24, Silver Spring MD
> 20904-4995.  Internet: tjacobs@clark.net, Voice: (202) 388-9742,
> BBS/Fax: (301) 890-0686.
>
> Publishes electronic novels from unagented writers.  Pays 5-20%
> royalty on retail price.  Publishes book an average of 4 weeks after
> manuscript is accepted.  Simultaneous submissions OK.  Reports in 3
> weeks on queries; 6-8 weeks on mss.
>
> Non-fiction: animals, anthropology, archaeology, artwork, business,
> computers, cooking, economics, electronics, government, how-to,
> humor, money/finance, politics, psychology, recreation, science,
> technical, and more.  Query at query@epub.clark.net or submit
> outline/synopsis with sample chapter to mss@epub.clark.net.
> Unsolicited mss welcome.
>
> Non-fiction tips: "Fact-filled doesn't mean dull.  Entertain as well
> as enlighten."
>
> Fiction: adventure, erotica, experimental, fantasy, horror, humor,
> juvenile, mystery, picture books, plays, romance, science fiction,
> short story collections, suspense, young adult.  Query at
> query@epub.clark.net or submit outline/synopsis with sample chapter
> to mss@epub.clark.net.  Unsolicited mss welcome.
>
> Poetry: query or submit complete mss.
>
> TIPS: Electronic submissions should be single-spaced plain vanilla
> ASCII with double spaces between paragraphs; query before using any
> other format.  Use margins of 5-75.  Use spell-checking and
> grammer-checking programs; mss which have obviously not been
> proof-read will be rejected without comment.
>
> --
> Todd A. Jacobs         | BBS/Fax ... (301) 890-0686
> Editor/Publisher       | Voice ..... (202) 388-9742
> Jacobs Publishing, LTD | InterNet .. tjacobs@clark.net
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 22 Mar 1994 14:47:14 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
>Appropriate use?
I debated whether or not to send this particular message but was intrigued
by the fact that they accept submissions and manuscripts electronically.  So
despite the fact that it constitutes an advertisement, I decided to post it.
However, I encourage discussion as to whether the readers consider this
appropriate use.  Internet advertising is usually more subtle... or not well
received.  James Powell (moderator of VPIEJ-L).
 
On Tue, 22 Mar 1994, Todd A. Jacobs wrote:
 
> JACOBS PUBLISHING, LTD: 13929 Castle Blvd. #24, Silver Spring MD
> 20904-4995.  Internet: tjacobs@clark.net, Voice: (202) 388-9742,
> BBS/Fax: (301) 890-0686.
>
> Publishes electronic novels from unagented writers.  Pays 5-20%
> royalty on retail price.  Publishes book an average of 4 weeks after
> manuscript is accepted.  Simultaneous submissions OK.  Reports in 3
> weeks on queries; 6-8 weeks on mss.
>
> Non-fiction: animals, anthropology, archaeology, artwork, business,
> computers, cooking, economics, electronics, government, how-to,
> humor, money/finance, politics, psychology, recreation, science,
> technical, and more.  Query at query@epub.clark.net or submit
> outline/synopsis with sample chapter to mss@epub.clark.net.
> Unsolicited mss welcome.
>
> Non-fiction tips: "Fact-filled doesn't mean dull.  Entertain as well
> as enlighten."
>
> Fiction: adventure, erotica, experimental, fantasy, horror, humor,
> juvenile, mystery, picture books, plays, romance, science fiction,
>...
 
James Powell ... Library Automation, University Libraries, VPI&SU
1-4986       ... JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
             ... jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             ... Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
Archives: http://borg.lib.vt.edu:80/   gopher://oldborg.lib.vt.edu:70/
          file://borg.lib.vt.edu/~ftp
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Mar 1994 08:13:56 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Susan Farrell 
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
>>Appropriate use?
 
I think so. We talk about strategies, genres, profitability, and
distribution. We are writers and editors. I vote that the
solicitation/announcement was topical and relevant *in this forum*.
 
****************************************
Susan.Farrell@gtri.gatech.edu, Research Associate
Electro-Optics, Environment, and Materials Laboratory
Communications and Training Technology Branch, O'Keefe 037
Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 30332-0800
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 23 Mar 1994 08:14:27 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JAYMACHADO@delphi.com
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
This whole appropriate use debate will no doubt open up a fine can o' worms.
It does everywhere else it crops up. I think in this case the announcement
was certainly 'on-topic' and relevant to the issues at hand. If I were to be
bombarded by useless adverts from this list, then it would be time for a
major flamefest. This was potentially useful information, although I have
some Florida real estate to offer anyone who thinks they're going to become
rich and/or well-known authors by publishing online. Not yet anyway.
 
That being said, it's pretty apparent (to me) that the situation on the net
is changing, and that that change has only just begun: for better or worse,
here comes everybody! Some form of advertising is going to have to be
accomodated as people begin to transact more of their lives/business via the
internet. As long as I can delete/filter unwanted junk, and as long as I can
bombard junkmailers with multiple copies of their own junk, I can live with
the occasional advert. Just one man's opinion....
======================================================================
==========  Jay Machado  =  Internet:
==========================  JAYMACHADO@delphi.com
phone (day) 215/209-2396 =  slakmaster@aol.com
      (eve) 609/795-0998 =  Editor, Bits and Bytes Online Edition
======================================================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Mar 1994 08:31:33 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Lou Burnard 
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
What's so intriguing about accepting manuscripts electronically? Show me
a publisher which *doesnt* accept electronic manuscripts, and I'll show
you a publisher about to go out of business!
 
In my view, the message referred to was definitely an advertisement. If
advertising for commercial gain on the internet is inappropriate, it was
ipso facto inappropriate. If I were engaged in the sleazy business of
vanity publishing, I'd probably feel aggrieved that this particular
operator managed to get a free plug for his operation where I hadn't. So
I'd probably try and get a plug for mine in pretty fast. So ,  batten
down the hatches, lads, here come the entrepreneurs ...
 
Lou Burnard
Oxford Text Archive
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Mar 1994 08:31:50 EST
Reply-To:     mzltov@nwu.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Herbert Jacob 
Subject:      Jacobs' posting
 
I see nothing wrong with a brief posting of this sort.  I use VPIEJ-l to
keep posted on new developments and increasingly, they will be commercial as
well as non-commercial.
(By the way, I am no relation to Jacobs.)
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Mar 1994 08:33:06 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Linda Shrumm 
Subject:      Re: New Market
In-Reply-To:  <9403231317.AA26687@lib.uwo.ca>
 
I would like to see this type of announcement on VPIEJ.  This is a forum for
electronic publishing & archiving.  I don't think we should exclude any
initiative.
 
Linda Shrumm
Project Coordinator - Publications of Faculty & Staff
Collections Management
The University of Western Ontario
 
 
 
On Wed, 23 Mar 1994, Susan Farrell wrote:
 
> >>Appropriate use?
>
> I think so. We talk about strategies, genres, profitability, and
> distribution. We are writers and editors. I vote that the
> solicitation/announcement was topical and relevant *in this forum*.
>
> ****************************************
> Susan.Farrell@gtri.gatech.edu, Research Associate
> Electro-Optics, Environment, and Materials Laboratory
> Communications and Training Technology Branch, O'Keefe 037
> Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 30332-0800
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Mar 1994 08:40:34 EST
Reply-To:     Matthew Guy de Ganon 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Matthew Guy de Ganon 
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
 
In article , James Powell
(JPOWELL@VTVM1.BITNET) writes:
>>Appropriate use?
>I debated whether or not to send this particular message but was intrigued
>by the fact that they accept submissions and manuscripts electronically.  So
>despite the fact that it constitutes an advertisement, I decided to post it.
>However, I encourage discussion as to whether the readers consider this
>appropriate use.  Internet advertising is usually more subtle... or not well
>received.  James Powell (moderator of VPIEJ-L).
>
>On Tue, 22 Mar 1994, Todd A. Jacobs wrote:
>
>> JACOBS PUBLISHING, LTD: 13929 Castle Blvd. #24, Silver Spring MD
>> 20904-4995.  Internet: tjacobs@clark.net, Voice: (202) 388-9742,
>> BBS/Fax: (301) 890-0686.
 
Etc., etc.
 
Personally, I do not mind *short* _pointers_ towards commercial
information.  I would have preferred if Mr. Jacobs had merely
pointed would be writers to e-mail him for information - thereby
saving us all his 50+ lines of info.  His presentation on the
otherhand is, IMHO, very inappropriate.  If your gonna make
*everyone* read it, you have to gear it towards general net use.
 
Mr. Jacobs - consider yourself mildly flamed. ;-7
 
--
______________________________________________________________
Matthew de Ganon
deganon@online.win.net      ~^~~ ~^~~
CompuServe 71477,1734        @).|  @).      what? was I supposed
914-337-0311 v&f .                    )
                                |    /      to say something here?
                               ^.^   ;
                               -=-) .
                             .  -  .
                              \._./
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 24 Mar 1994 08:41:02 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         bob jansen 
Subject:      Re: New Market
 
I think this situation of advertising is going to be more common and I
guess is going to place a greater strain on moderators of lists such as
this. Personally, I dont want to receive it but accept that the internet
offers too good an opportunity to waste. I would suggest that this is the
reason why publishing organisations began, to filter out the noise and
esure a high information content in published books. Maybe we need the same
for the internet.
 
bobj
 
PS. How much is that block in Florida and does it have views of the spaceport?
 
-------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist, Knowledge-Based Systems
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus, North Ryde NSW 2113,
          AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone: +612 325 3100  Fax: +612 325 3101
email: jansen@syd.dit.csiro.au
-------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 26 Mar 1994 13:34:57 EST
Reply-To:     lnm2@cornell.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Lee Miller 
Subject:      Meeting announcement
 
Here is an announcement of a meeting and two courses that should be of
interest to editors and publishers. The Council of Biology Editors is a
NONPROFIT organization that publishes a widely-used style manual and
provides information and education to its members and others in the world
of scientific publishing.
 
                                       +++++
 
The Council of Biology Editors (CBE) is the leading organization for people
concerned with scholarly publishing in the sciences. Its publication, the
CBE Style Manual, is used by many scholarly journals in science.
 
The 1100 members of CBE represent the breadth of interest in scientific
publishing--journal and book editors, managing editors, technical editors,
freelance editors, publishers, printers, and authors. The purpose of the
Council is to improve communication in the life sciences by educating
authors, editors, and publishers; by providing efficient means of
cooperation among persons interested in publishing in the life sciences;
and by promoting effective communication practices in primary and secondary
publishing in any form.
                                       +++++
 
                            COUNCIL OF BIOLOGY EDITORS
                                  ANNUAL MEETING
                                  MAY 14-17, 1994
                                QUEBEC CITY, QUEBEC
 
 
                                     ATTENTION
 Editors
  Editorial board members
   Peer reviewers
    Scientist-authors
     Managing editors
      Manuscript editors
       Author's editors
        Publishers
 
 
Come to the 38th Annual Meeting of the Council of Biology Editors for four
days of a stimulating mix of plenary and concurrent sessions and informal
networking. The topics listed below will be presented by experts in the
field of scientific publishing worldwide.
 
 
                                  KEYNOTE SPEAKER
 
Dr. Claude T. Bishop, Former Editor-in-Chief,
National Research Council of Canada Research Journals
and author of the book "How to Edit a Scientific Journal"
 
 
               ANNUAL MEETING PLENARY AND CONCURRENT SESSION TOPICS
 
Order out of chaos: managing multifile projects on computer
Does peer review suppress innovation?
Implementing change in pre-existing operations
Alternative forms of revenue for journals
 
Jerks or crooks?: the differences between ethics and etiquette in science
Understanding your organization's financial statements
Developing publishing contracts and agreements
Ethics and the publication of clinical genetics
"See-Quest"--perspectives on tables and graphs
 
Good language, good science--questions of usage in scientific editing
Pressures to cut corners on research
International marketing in the 90s
Projects: so who is in control here?
 
New publishing and information delivery services
Desktop vs traditional publishing: choosing appropriately
Heroic measures or euthanasia for ailing journals?
Research integrity: current controversies involving authorship standards
Editors and advertisers
 
An editor looks at the readers--are we meeting their needs?
Interviewing, selecting, and retaining employees
More informative journal articles: structured abstracts, titles, methods,
and derivatives
Adding value to information bases
 
My problem? Your problem: case studies in the author's editor's responsibilities
Prepublication release of information
 The use and importance of standard generalized markup language (SGML) to
scientific and technical publishing
A practical view of digital technology opportunities for STM publishers
 
The Vancouver Group--Who needs it?
Scientific book acquisition and publishing
CD-ROM making and marketing
 Document delivery services and contracts: the relationship between primary
and secondary publishers
 
The economics of publishing: contrasting the Canadian and U.S. models
Critical issues today in electronic information dissemination
Cost-cutting techniques for journals
The editorial board--prestige or purpose?
Manuscript tracking
 
 
Annual Meeting Registration Fees:
 
    Postmark before 14 April   Postmark after 14 April
CBE Member: $245 US/$348 CDN     $280 US/$398 CDN
Nonmember:*   $300 US/$426 CDN     $335 US/$476 CDN
    *Nonmember fee includes $55 dues for 1994 membership.
 
                            For a registration program
CALL, FAX, or WRITE to
 
Council of Biology Editors
Department AM
11 South LaSalle Street
Suite 1400
Chicago, IL 60603
Tel: 312-201-0101
Fax: 312-201-0214
 
                    PRE- AND POST-CONFERENCE COURSES AVAILABLE
 
                                     +++++++++
 
 
                           PRE-ANNUAL CBE MEETING COURSE
 
                       CBE SHORT COURSE FOR JOURNAL EDITORS
 
Are you a newly appointed editor or an experienced editor looking for a
 refresher?
 
CBE offers a SHORT COURSE FOR JOURNAL EDITORS the two days before the
annual meeting--May 13 and 14 this year.
 
The program addresses
 * Journal content--policies and peer review
 * Journal management--manuscript tracking and journal production
 * Journal management--finances
 
Presented by
 Stephen Lock, MD, Editor Emeritus, British Medical Journal
 Morna Conway, PhD, President, The Conway Group
 Edward Huth, MD, Editor, Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials
 Robert Utiger, MD, Deputy Editor, The New England Journal of Medicine
 Diane Lang, Editorial Manager, Radiological Society of North America
 Carol Douglas, Production Manager, Radiological Society of North America
 Cheryl Iverson, MA, Editorial Processing Director, AMA Scientific Publications
 
Fees: CBE Member $295 (US) or $495 (Canadian)
  Nonmember* $360 (US) or $511 (Canadian)
    *Nonmember fee includes $55 dues for 1994 membership.
 
Registration limited to 50 participants.
 
                            For a registration packet
                               CALL, FAX, or WRITE
 
Council of Biology Editors
Department AM
11 South LaSalle Street
Suite 1400
Chicago, IL 60603
Tel: 312-201-0101
Fax: 312-201-0214
 
                                      ++++++
 
 
                          POST-ANNUAL CBE MEETING SEMINAR
 
                 "STATISTICS FOR THE EDITOR: WHEN TO ASK FOR HELP"
 
                            A 3-hour hands-on workshop
                                   conducted by
                             John C. Bailar, MD, PhD,
           Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
                                 McGill University
 
                               Tuesday, May 17, 1994
                                Fee $20 US/$28 CDN
 
                            For a registration packet
                               CALL, FAX, or WRITE
 
Council of Biology Editors
Department AM
11 South LaSalle Street
Suite 1400
Chicago, IL 60603
Tel: 312-201-0101
Fax: 312-201-0214
 
 
 
Any individual interested in the purpose of the CBE is eligible for regular
membership.
 
                                    - end -
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 26 Mar 1994 13:35:47 EST
Reply-To:     Julie Mangin 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Julie Mangin 
Subject:      NAL commits to 'electronic library' goal (fwd)
 
 
 
 
***********************************************************************
 
                         Contact: Brian Norris (301) 504-6778
 
NAL COMMITS TO `ELECTRONIC LIBRARY' GOAL
 
     BELTSVILLE, MD--On January 1, 1995, the National
Agricultural Library (NAL) will take a major step in its
commitment to becoming an "electronic library."
 
     "On that date, electronic information becomes the `preferred
medium' for library materials in an all-out push to make NAL's
services and its collection available in various electronic
formats worldwide," said acting NAL Director Pamela Andre.
 
     Andre said that NAL's ultimate goal is to become "truly a
library without walls, where our magnificent collection can be
accessed by computer by anyone, anywhere and at anytime."
 
     According to Andre, NAL is making this commitment because of
its belief that "the current paper-based information delivery
system is inadequate to keep pace with the needs of the modern
agriculturalist."
 
     The "electronic library" goal was set in an "Electronic
Information Initiative--Phase I" undertaken by NAL as part of a
strategic plan to guide NAL operations into the next century.
The overall purpose of the initiative is to research, plan and
implement a systematic program of managing data in electronic
form.
 
     "Phase I was a consideration of the issues associated with
NAL's ability to manage electronically created and stored
information," Andre said.  "The final report recommends actions
NAL must take in order to provide full electronic access to
information in the increasingly networked agricultural
community."
 
     Andre said NAL set the January 1, 1995 goal in a "statement
of commitment" contained in the Phase I Final Report.  In part,
the statement says, "Increasingly, information is produced in
digitized form, and with recent telecommunications innovations
and the Internet, the resources available to the computer
literate researcher are expanding exponentially...
(consequently) The NAL is taking the initiative in a systematic
program of managing data in electronic form and establishing
strategies for collecting, storing and distributing U.S.
agricultural information in electronic form."
 
     The statement ends, "To demonstrate its commitment to
meeting the challenges of becoming an `electronic library,' on
January 1, 1995, the National Agricultural Library will designate
electronic information the preferred medium."
 
     Other steps NAL will take to achieve its electronic library
goal are: tie in to electronic networks worldwide to provide
"seamless access to information;" shift and add resources to
acquire, process and make available electronic data; work closely
with other world agencies and libraries to emphasize electronic
information; and convert its own publications from print to
electronic media.
 
     Details of the NAL effort are contained in "The Electronic
Information Initiative: Phase I Final Report: A Key Success
Factor in the NAL Strategic Plan."  Copies of the report are
available via anonymous FTP at "cliff.nalusda.gov" in the
"/pub/elec.init" directory as filename "eii-rpt.txt".  Copies are
also available on 3 1/4" diskette by sending a blank formatted
disk to:
 
     Head, Document Delivery Services Branch
     Attn: Electronic Initiative Diskettes
     National Agricultural Library, Room 300
     10301 Baltimore Ave.
     Beltsville, MD 20705-2351
 
     "NAL cannot afford to ignore the flood of electronic
advances taking place that we can use to serve our users more
effectively," Andre said.  "With this announcement we have
committed ourselves to mastering information technology, to the
benefit of U.S. and world agriculture."
 
     NAL is one of three national libraries of the United States,
with the Library of Congress and the National Library of
Medicine.  It is the largest agricultural library in the world.
                                    #
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 30 Mar 1994 11:51:48 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Barry Kapke 
Subject:      GASSHO v1n3 is now available
 
 
                  ---|  ---   ---|  ---| |   |  |---|
                 |     |   | |     |     |   |  |   |
                 |  -- |---| |---  |---  |---|  |   |
                 |   | |   |     |     | |   |  |   |
                  ---- |   | |---  |---  |   |  |---|
 
                                GASSHO
            Electronic Journal of DharmaNet International
                      and the Global Online Sangha
 
     Volume 1, Number 3       ISSN 1072-2971         March/April 1994
  =======================================================================
 
  Editor-in-Chief:     Barry Kapke             dharma@netcom.com  or
                                               Fidonet: 1:125/33.0
  Copy Editor:         John Bullitt            john.bullitt@metta.ci.net
  Production Staff:    David Savage            @lchance.sat.tx.us
  Board of Advisors:   Robert Aitken Roshi     Amaro Bhikkhu
                       Carl Bielefeldt         Bhikkhu Bodhi
                       Thubten Chodron         T. Matthew Ciolek
                       Roger Corless           Rev. Karuna Dharma
                       Christina Feldman       Gangcen Tulku Rinpoche
                       Maha Ghosananda         Joseph Goldstein
                       Joan Halifax            Ayya Khema
                       Anne C. Klein           Jack Kornfield
                       Jacqueline Mandell      Ken McLeod
                       Andrew Olendzki         Charles S. Prebish
                       Alan Senauke            Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                       Christopher Titmuss     others to be announced
 
 ========================================================================
  GASSHO is a Buddhist newsletter, published by DharmaNet International,
  P.O. Box 4951, Berkeley, CA 94704-4951, a not-for-profit organization.
 ========================================================================
 
                          Table of Contents:
 
  {1}  EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor
  {2}  NEWS BRIEFS: Nobel Peace Prize Nominees; Dalai Lama to Receive
       Freedom Medal; Pali Tipitaka CD-ROM
  {3}  DHARMANET NEWS: How to Access DEFA; Internet <=> DharmaNet
       Wormhole; INSIGHT Mailing List; DharmaBase
  {4}  NEW RESOURCES: BUDSIR; Dialing for Dharma; alt.* Newcomers;
       DharmaDebateHall MOO
  {5}  CONFERENCE NEWS: Envisioning Tibet (Australia)
  {6}  LETTERS: Say NO!; Bring Out the Best; GASSHO Format
  {7}  DIALOGUE: The Second Precept: Generosity (Thich Nhat Hanh)
  {8}  ARTICLE: A Slice of Life in My Virtual Community (Howard
       Rheingold)
  {9}  ARTICLE: Computer Networks and the Emergence of Global Civil
       Society (Howard H. Frederick)
  {10} PRACTICE: Questions and Answers (Ajahn Chah)
  {11} CALENDAR: March - May 1994
  {12} REVIEWS: Buddhism After Patriarchy
  {13} RESOURCES: ANU Social Sciences Information Services (T.M. Ciolek)
  {14} SANGHA: FPMT Centers (World)
  {15} ANNOUNCEMENTS
  {16} A PARTING THOUGHT
  {17} ABOUT GASSHO
 
  =======================================================================
                 How to Get Electronic Copies of GASSHO:
  =======================================================================
 
  Internet users may receive GASSHO by electronic subscription in
  Mailing List format. Send an email message to: dharma@netcom.com
  asking to subscribe to GASSHO. This is *not* a Listserv.
 
  Back issues are available by anonymous ftp to the Dharma Electronic
  Files Archive at FTP.NETCOM.COM (192.100.81.100). Change directory to
  /pub/dharma/Gassho/Gassho-01-mar94/
 
  gass0103.zip       Compressed version of GASSHO v1n3 (Mar/Apr 94)
  gass0103.nws       Uncompressed, full-text version of GASSHO v1n3
  readme.1st         DharmaNet electronic distribution agreement
 
  The first edition is available in /pub/dharma/Gassho/Gassho-01-nov93/
  The second edition is in /pub/dharma/Gassho/Gassho-01-jan94/
 
  If you have difficulty ftp-ing files from the Dharma Electronic Files
  Archive (DEFA) at FTP.NETCOM.COM, remember that capitalization and
  spelling counts.
 
  GASSHO is also archived at the Electronic Buddhist Archives at
  coombs.anu.edu.au and is available by ftp, gopher, or WWW.
 
  Additionally, these files may be retrieved via "ftpmail" for those
  without "anonymous ftp" capability. Send an e-mail message addressed
  to "ftpmail@metta.ci.net". In the message body put "GET GASS0103.ZIP"
  (current edition) or "GET GASS0101.ZIP" (first edition) or "GET
  ALLFILES.LST" (list of all available files). The file will be returned
  to you as uuencoded e-mail.
 
  Back issues are also available for dial-up download from DharmaNet
  File Distribution Network (DFN) Sites listed below. To become a DFN
  site, please contact Barry Kapke at BODY DHARMA ONLINE.
 
  Quarto Mundista BBS, Olympia WA    206-786-9629   Fidonet: 1:352/333
  I CAN! BBS, Chicago IL             312-736-7434   Fidonet: 1:115/738
  The Magic Bus, Royal Oak MI        313-544-3653   Fidonet: 1:120/418
  Access to Insight, Barre MA        508-433-5847   Fidonet: 1:322/750
  BODY DHARMA ONLINE, Berkeley CA    510-836-4717   Fidonet: 1:125/33
  DangFool, Waverly Hall GA          706-582-3238   Fidonet: 1:3613/8
  Mysteria, Tujunga CA               818-353-8891   Fidonet: 1:102/943
  The Electric Fox, Memphis TN       901-327-1008   Fidonet: 1:123/10
  Converse, Raunds UK                44-933-460744  Fidonet: 2:2504/209
  DoJo, Lindfield NSW, AUSTRALIA     61-2-416-3547  Fidonet: 3:711/918
 
  GASSHO may also be received through the Fidonet "filebone" by
  subscribing to the file area, DN_NEWS. Note: not all filebone hubs
  carry the DharmaNet File Distribution Network areas. Please see the
  weekly Fidonet file, FILEBONE.NA, for more information. The DharmaNet
  file areas are also available via satellite feed through Planet
  Connect.
  =======================================================================
  [end]
 
--
Barry Kapke - via FidoNet node 1:125/1
UUCP: ...!uunet!kumr!shelter!33!Barry.Kapke
INTERNET: Barry.Kapke@f33.n125.z1.FIDONET.ORG
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 31 Mar 1994 09:19:29 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         JF Rowland 
Subject:      Report on ELVYN Project
 
                                  ELVYN
       The Delivery of an Electronic Version of a Journal from the
                         Publisher to Libraries
 
The ELVYN project is a joint activity of SCONUL, Institute of
Physics Publishing Ltd (IoPP) and Loughborough University of
Technology, funded by the British Library Research and
Development Department.  It investigates the scenario of dual
(print and electronic) publishing of journals in the physical
sciences by delivery of the electronic file from the publisher
to academic libraries, each of which mounts the file at its own
site. The journal chosen for the project is Modelling and
Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE),
published by IoPP in printed form quarterly since October 1992.
 
The stages of the project are as follows:
 
*    Investigation of the requirements of materials scientists
     and libraries at each of seven sites, chosen for their
     expected level of interest in the subject of the journal.
 
*    Design and implementation of a system for provision of the
     full file (text and graphics) of MSMSE at each of the sites.
 
*    Recruitment of users and collection of usage and costs data
     at each of the sites.
 
The publishers' intention was not to dictate to sites what form
of the database they should have, but to seek to meet the
different requirements of each site.  Thus several quite
different implementations have been developed.
 
The first stage was complete by Spring 1993 and the second by
Spring 1994.  Collection of usage and costs data will be
undertaken between April and July 1994 and the final report
prepared by September 1994.
 
Conclusions derived from experience to date are as follows:
 
*    To arrive at a consensus among a group of potential users
     at each site, and library staff who would have to implement
     the system, was not easy, and in some cases impractical
     choices emerged from stage 1 and have had to be revised.
 
*    The implementation of the system at each site was a larger
     technical task than had been envisaged, almost always
     requiring active involvement of computing staff as well as
     library staff and taking a longer time than expected.
 
*    Not all of the chosen sites where concentrations of
     materials scientists exist were able to implement the
     project and some replacement sites had to be selected at a
     late stage.
 
*    In spite of the expected level of interest at the chosen
     sites, recruitment of users has been difficult; this may be
     due to people's unwillingness to learn a new system for the
     sake of a single quarterly journal.
 
Fytton Rowland, Research Fellow, Department of Information & Library Studies,
Loughborough University of Technology, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
Phone +44 509 223057      Fax +44 509 223053       E-mail J.F.Rowland@lut.ac.uk
 
(Note for non-UK readers: SCONUL is the Standing Conference of National and
University Libraries)
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 31 Mar 1994 09:20:11 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         dallas 
Organization: Internex Online, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (416 363 3783)
Subject:      SCANNER SOFTWARE
 
I am not sure that this is the proper place for this request for help so
please forgive me if it isn't't.
 
I just bought a Microtek flatbed color scanner and I got PhotoShop (LE)
bundled with it, however, I need some software that will scan TEXT as
well and allow me to edit that text.  Does anyone know of any software
that will do that plus other goodies??
 
The recommendation is really appreciated.
 
Thanks
---
 ~ QMPro 1.52 ~ Travel important today;  IRS men arrive tomorrow.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 31 Mar 1994 09:24:18 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      E-Journal Entries, Desperately Seeking
 
The hardworking cyberstaff of the Association of Research Libraries,
along with volunteer friends in e-land, are working hard on compiling
the data entries for the 4th edition of the DIRECTORY OF ELECTRONIC
JOURNALS and NEWSLETTERS which we hope will be available in May.  There
are, at this point, a number of journals that have proved to be highly
elusive.  They have shown up fleetingly on CICnet or other large sites
or they have been in earlier editions of the DIRECTORY but mail to
anyone apparently associated with these titles, a search through the
e-site, and attempts to subscribe or otherwise hunt them down meet with
no success.
 
We are offering our problem list to VPIEJ-Land, SERIALST Land and other
lists and ask that if any of you create these titles or know someone who
knows who edits them or know that they have become ex-e-journals (or
never were in the first place), that you send a quick note of your
sightings to us at:
 
e-direct@cni.org
 
If you give us a successful helping hand, we'll acknowledge you in our
new edition, so please include your name and e-mail address in body of
the message.
 
Our thanks in advance from Lisabeth King (ARL Research Assisstant and
resident Cyberperson), Dru Mogge (ARL Electronic Services Coordinator),
and Ann Okerson (ARL Office of Scientific & Academic Publishing).
 
 
TITLE
 
ACM Info Flash
American Society of Plant Taxonomists
Automatome (CIC:  1992 most recent)
Between the Lines
BioConservation News
Body Electronic
Braille Forum
Braille Monitor
Buffer
Cache Update (CIC: most recent 10/93)
CACTUS newsletter (CIC: most recent 5/93)
CARF-Computer Assisted Research
CCO Newsletter
Cerigua Weekly Briefs
Chaos Digest
Chasqui-Latin American Journal on
Chile News Database
CHIP
Class Four Relay Magazine
Climate/Ecosystem Dynamics
Complexity International
Computer and Information Science
Computer Science Center Link
Cmputing and Network news
Computing Research Association
Computing Services Newsletter News
Connection Science
CONSERline
Cornell Chronicle
CoSN News
Cropduster
CTHEORY
Daily Texan
Delaware Valley Rail Passenger
Delta (CIC:  most recent summer 93)
Deutschland Nachrichten
DevelopNet News
EARNEST-the EARN Newsletter
ECO
Electronic ERIC-ECCE Newsletter
Electronic Hebrew Users Newsletter
Electronic Letters Onine
Electronic Review
End Process
Energy Ideas (CIC: most recent 12/93)
FARNET Gazette (CIC: most recent 1991)
Federal Information News Syndicate (CIC: most recent 5/93)
Fineart Forum (CIC: most recent 10/92)
Forefronts
French Language Press Review (CIC: most recent 5/93)
Frog Farm
Forg-net
Future Culture FAQ (CIC: most recent 1992)
GNN News
GNU's Bulletin of the Free Software Foundation
Hack Report
Hi-Rez
High Weirdness by Email
Hindu Digest
ISPOB Bulletin YSSTI
IAMS
ICPSR Bulletin
ICS Electrozine (CIC: most recent 4/93)
Info Mac Digest (sumex.stanford)
Information Arcade Bulletin (Iowa?)
Information Policy Online Newsletter
Interactive Publishing Alert
Internet Advertising Review
Internet Society Newsletter
IPE ISA News
IPENET E-news (CIC)
Jalinan Jaring (CIC)
Journal of Fluids Engineering
Kanji of the Day (CIC: most recent 92)
Legal Bytes (CIC: most recent Spring 93)
Leonardo Electronic News (CIC: most recent 9/92)
MAG Northern Sciences Network
MAGnet Newsletter
Mathematical Research Letters
MeckJournal
Mendele (CIC)
Meta
MichNet News (CIC: most recnet 12/93)
MNS Reviews
Modal Analysis (international journal) (CIC: most recent 91)
Mother Jones Magazine
'Nam Vet Newsletter
NEARnet Newsletter (CIC)
NEARnet This Month (CIC: most recent 1/94)
Nekuda E-journal (CIC: one issue 1993)
Neon Gargoyle Gazette
Net-News
Nework Audio Bits and Audio Software
Network News (CIC: most recent 11/93)
Network--Nova Scotia
NeXT Users Journal
Obscure Electric
Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials (OCLC)
        and other OCLC e-journals
Online Journal of Knowledge Synthesis
People Tribune (CIC: most recent 7/93)
Phrist Amendment (CIC: most recent 1/93)
Postmodern Jewish Philosophy
Progressive News
Qic News and Notes
Queer Pride International
Query
RD: Graduate Research in the Arts
Scientist (ISI)
Scope News
Screams of Abel (CIC)
Simple Times (CIC)
Smarter Student
Sound News and Arts
Sound Newsletter
Space Views (CIC: one issue 1992)
Strangeways
Sweden Calling DXers
Syllabus
Telelearning Network Synthesizer
Terminometro Electronico
TeXhax Digest
TeXMaG
The e-club Review
Tunisian Scientific Society Newsletter
UCAR Newsletter
UKTeX Digest
Ulam Quarterly
Voices
Week in Germany
Windows Online Review
Word, the
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 31 Mar 1994 09:24:41 EST
Reply-To:     "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      AAUP/ARL Symposium IV -- Call For Presentations
 
 
 
************************************************************************
 
                MAKING THE FUTURE WORK TODAY
 
************************************************************************
 
 
                ANNOUNCEMENT & CALL FOR PAPERS
                Association of American University Presses
                Association of Research Libraries
 
                In Partnership with:
 
                The American Physical Society
                The Johns Hopkins University Press
                The University of Virginia Library
 
        Sponsor the Fourth Symposium of the ARL and AAUP
        Visions and Opportunities in Electronic Publishing
 
 
                November 5-7, 1994
                Washington, DC
 
 
The symposium series sponsored by the ARL and the AAUP has become a
space apart, where stakeholders in academe and scholarly communications
-- faculty, librarians, and publishers from university presses and
learned/professional societies -- can gather to exchange information
about their interests and concerns.  The Fourth Symposium will focus on
four issues: fair use, cost recovery, developing content, and
cooperative ventures.  As the title indicates, the organizers are
especially keen to explore those areas where the interests of the
various participants may appear to diverge and in stimulating productive
discussions, particularly within academe, about concrete ways in which
we can work together to resolve any differences.
 
As customary, the Symposium will open late Saturday afternoon with
keynote addresses, reception, and convivial dining opportunities in
cafes and restaurants of Washington, DC.
 
Both Sunday and Monday will feature a mix of plenary and breakout
sessions.
 
Plenary sessions will focus on the overarching themes of:
 
        o Defining Fair Use in the Networked Environment
        o Exploring Alternative Cost Recovery Mechanisms
        o Filling the Pipeline:  Innovations in Electronic Scholarship
        o Realigning Campus Roles and Relationships
 
Breakout sessions are designed to encourage small group interaction with
symposium participants.  The presentations will be a concentrated
introduction to inform the audience of what is involved in the work
being described.  Visual presentation and detailed handouts will be
emphasized.  The breakouts will be of two types.
 
        o Demonstrations of innovative applications of new technologies
        (e.g., multimedia, Mosaic, Acrobat, hyperlinks) to a *publishing*
        activity, which might include business innovations such as
        advertising, cost recovery.
 
        o Case studies of successful networked publishing projects that
        emphasize the content and look/feel of the work, rather than the
        technology per se.
 
We seek a range of offerings that include administration and management,
theory, legal issues, the practice of publishing and librarianship as it
embraces networked electronic cooperative ventures, economics, specific
projects, live demos, scholarly projects, and any other related areas.
The proposals may come from the wide range of people involved in
academic scholarly and scientific communications: scholars, scientists,
administrators, press and society personnel, librarians, software and
hardware creators, and others in related fields.  ***We are particularly
interested in proposals for papers that offer new perspectives on, and
propose solutions to, the issues mentioned above in the not-for-profit
higher education environment.***
 
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS & PROPOSALS: April 30, 1994
 
Submit your name, affiliation, title of presentation, type of
presentation (paper, technical demonstration, case study), need for
technology support at the meeting site, and comprehensive abstract to:
 
symposium@e-math.ams.org
 
        CO-CHAIRS:
 
        Lisa Freeman, Director, University of Minnesota Press
        lfreeman@maroon.tc.umn.edu
        Ann Okerson, Association of Research Libraries
        ann@cni.org
 
        PROGRAM COMMITTEE:
 
        Robert Kelly, American Physical Society
        Susan Lewis, The Johns Hopkins University Press
        Karen Marshall, Alderman Library, University of Virginia
        David Rodgers, American Mathematical Society
 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
 
Speakers and presenters will be offered assistance with expenses.
Speakers must supply copies of their papers, demonstrations, or case
studies in publishable form at the time of the symposium.  These will be
published in the Symposium proceedings.
 
The Third Symposium, Gateways and Gatekeepers, held in November 1993
attracted 160 participants and featured one post-event optional
excursion, "A Day in the Electronic Village," created by the University
of Virginia Library.  The November 1994 will offer two excursions:
 
o "Day in the Village" (University of Virginia Library) and a
o "Day at the University Press" (The Johns Hopkins University Press
   with the support of the Eisenhower Library, JHU).