VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

September 1994

=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 1 Sep 1994 08:21:36 EDT
Reply-To:     L Zeredo 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         L Zeredo 
Subject:      Call for I ECOSIS 94
 
I would like to submit the Call for the First Electronic Conference on
Strategic Information Systems (I ECOSIS 94)
 
Message cross posted to the following lists and list-requests:
 
SIS@MAILBASE.AC.UK
SIS-EJOURNAL@MAILBASE.AC.UK
VPIEJ-L-REQUEST@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
EISSIG-REQUEST@ASUACAD.EARN
ICIS-L-REQUEST@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU
IPCT-L-REQUEST@GUVM.GEORGETOWN.EDU
PACS-L-REQUEST@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU
 
 
Copias para:
 
becherini@if.usp.br
ruderico@sol.uniemp.br
 
 
Copies sent to:
 
*Karen McBride 
 Editor: Campus Watch
*Adam C. Engst 
 Editor: TIDBITS
*Dr. Robert H. Anderson 
 Editor-in-Chief: The Information Society
 
***************************************************
 
CALL FOR PAPERS TO THE FIRST ECOSIS 94
Electronic Conference on Strategic Information Systems
 
LINES OR KBYTES?
 
15-16 December 1994
SIS@Mailbase.ac.uk
 
 
CONTENTS
1. Why?
2. Suggested Headlines
3. How to Submit
4. Copyright
5. Purpose of SIS & SIS-EJOURNAL
6. Final Considerations
7. Definitions
 
 
1. WHY?
 
 
The Electronic Conference on Strategic Information Systems (ECOSIS) 94
aims to offer a forum in which people interested in SIS could communicate
as they would in a conference. The standard that the academic community
will use to communicate the scholarly scientific production during ECOSIS
is one aspect that may constitute innovation. Not only the Academia but
also corporate professionals are invited to submit high quality papers for
presentation. By addressing your paper to our Electronic Conference you
are also supporting the electronic form of publication, since any accepted
work will only be available in electronic archives (ASCII format) at SIS-
EJOURNAL@Mailbase.ac.uk, or retrievable via FTP to mailbase.ac.uk,
directory /pub/sis-ejournal. Furthermore, you retain you copyright to
publish the same text in any printed journal, or book.
 
 
Despite the fact that the ECOSIS 94 has a specific date to be realised, each
contribution will be published in the SIS-EJOURNAL immediately after
being approved. Thereafter, you will be able to receive instantaneous reply
from members of the SIS list. There will be no charge at all for subscription,
but only the join SIS (& SIS-EJOURNAL) command sent to Mailbase
System, as usual for new members.
 
 
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
 
 
2. SUGGESTED HEADLINES
 
 
Strategic Information Systems (SIS) might be used today as an acronym to
identify three different categories of studies and business concerns. The
first one related to the "strategic planning for the uses of IT", for "linkage
of
corporate strategy and IT strategy", and for "studies of the sustainability of
competitive advantage offered by strategic systems". The second focus had
been on "modelling information systems that provide strategic information",
i.e., information considered relevant for monitoring the organisational
strategy and information for strategic planning. "Case studies addressing the
effectiveness of strategic systems" might be considered part of that second
focus. Lastly, an emerging attention is being devoted to the "construction of
an organisational information network", not necessarily available in a
database, but made from fairly dynamic "message bases". As far as I am
concerned, the first person to use that expression  was Richard Perry
, in his message of Tue., 2 Aug. 1994 15:15:08 -0400
(EDT), addressed to me.
 
 
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
 
 
3. HOW TO SUBMIT
 
 
(Text extracted from the Introduction file to SIS-EJOURNAL, available on
mailbase.ac.uk, directory: /pub/sis-ejournal, via anonymous FTP.)
 
 
 Submissions are invited in the following four major categories:
 
 
 - ARTicles:
   research in progress:  reports of research questions being addressed,
                          theoretical foundations, research methodology
                          being used
 
 
   research results:      theoretical, practical, or any combination of
                          the two (analysis of preliminary results is
                          required)
 
 
   research surveys:      reports of the state of the art in the area
                          of research (these may be done in the form of
                          a literature review)
 
 
 - REActions:             critiques of previous research, and replies to
                          articles
 
 
 - ABSstracts:            summaries of recently published journal
                          articles, books, and conference proceedings
 
 
 - book REViews:          indications of the content of recent books
                          and evaluation of their merits as contributions
                          to research and/or as textbooks
 
 
 Submissions should be sent to
 
     SIS-EJOURNAL-request@mailbase.ac.uk (if you are a subscriber), or
     L.ZEREDO@SUNC.SHEF.AC.UK (General Editor)
 
 
 All submitted material should be preceded by a cover page showing:
 1- title (authors are invited to add key phrases to titles)
 2- desired category of publication (see abbreviations above)
 3- author's name
 4- author's physical address
 5- author's electronic address
 6- author's institutional affiliation
 
 
 An ARTicle, REAction or ABStract should include in addition the
 following:
 1- title (as on cover page)
 2- abstract (descriptive or informative)
 3- keywords
 4- text
 5- references (cited in text; see examples above and below)
 
 
 A book REView should include further:
 1- full publication-reference for the book
 2- brief description of the book's contents
 3- indication of its intended readership
 4- evaluation of how well the author(s)/editor(s) have achieved their
    stated aims
 5- critiques of the organisation of material, of the clarity and logic
    of arguments, of the accuracy of statements of fact, of the
    originality / importance of the book for the topic, of the design
    of any experiments reported, and of its style
 6- brief comments on the general appearance of the book, its
    legibility, incidence of errors, clarity of illustrations, accuracy
    and coverage of the references and whether they are up to date, and
    on the usefulness of the index.
 
 
 Accuracy of references is the book author's responsibility;  but
 reviewers should check that the details are complete.
 
 
4. COPYRIGHT
 
 
 
 Authors of accepted contributions assign to SIS-EJOURNAL the
 right to publish the text electronically in screen-readable
 ASCII and to make it available permanently in electronic
 archives. Authors do, however, retain copyright  to their
 contributions and may republish them in any form that they
 choose, so long as they clearly acknowledge SIS-EJOURNAL
 @mailbase.ac.uk as the original source of publication.
 
 
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
 
 
5. PURPOSE OF SIS & SIS-EJOURNAL
 
 
SIS MISSION (extracted from the SIS Strategic Plan)
 
"SIS list aims to support each other in improving the concept and practice
of strategic IS planning."
 
"We'll achieve this by means of the following activities:
 
Provide the appropriate environment in the area of SIS modelling,
implementation and use, for people to tell about their experiences, to
communicate interests and points of view, to address findings, doubts
and enquiries, and to criticise research papers. Develop, filter and give
feedback to developers of SIS concepts and tools in order to advance
their personal and institutional goals. Make widely available
bibliography, literature reviews, and on-line papers about SIS. Facilitate
formation of contacts for consulting referrals, for people who want to
improve the world and make business as SIS consultants."
 
 
 
SIS-EJOURNAL PURPOSE
 
 
The Electronic Journal of Strategic Information Systems (SIS-
EJOURNAL) aims to encourage, advance, and communicate
interdisciplinary thinking in the field of strategic
information systems, by means of fast electronic publication.
 
Through its rapid publication, SIS-EJOURNAL offers workers in
this field ready reference to one another's published ideas,
online access, and easy retrieval of timely information.
 
 
Once contributions are accepted, SIS-EJOURNAL publishes them
without delay. Each contribution is published individually, sent
out immediately after acceptance by the reviewers. Every five
contributions comprise one issue, and each year's issues comprise
one volume. Past contributions can be accessed by downloading from
the SIS-EJOURNAL archive.
 
 
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
 
 
6. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS
 
 
Electronic Journals (ejournals/) are not replacing printed ones. They are
addressing a different market, which consists of people that enjoy reading
on screen, retrieving files from the Internet, who join electronic lists, and
have good writing skills. Moreover, people who don't need to see each other
to work as a group, who are used to find documents and search for words in
a text using word processor features. In addition to that, they want to have
instant access to files, fidelity and rapidity when communicating their
thoughts. Consequently, they are looking for computer communication,
which is a lot more reliable and a lot faster than the printed media and
physical workshops, or Conferences. This is what some authors call
"Information Society".
 
 
Why they are not replacing printed media? Simply for the reason that there
will always be individuals with other abilities and that prefer to meet people
physically, read printed papers and search for papers on shelves. What is at
stake here is a complete change in human behaviour. This not to quote the
capability of ejournals/ to store executable files, graphics, and sound, that
allows the eventual availability of demo files for presentation of programs.
 
 
The Electronic Conferences (ECOs) are not replacing the physical ones.
Why? Because it is in our nature the need to meet people for face-to-face
communication and -- why not mention that? -- we may be interested in
knowing other places in this small Planet in which we live. Whatever the
time of day or night, someone, somewhere, will be holding a "conference".
David Seekings, in his book How to Organize Effective Conferences and
Meetings, states that a survey into the UK conference market published by
Coopers & Lybrand Deloitte suggests an excess of 115 million delegate
days, against 90 million during the recession of 91/92. He adds that 85% of
the conferences last no more than three days, and that 70% of all events are
for groups of fewer than 50 delegates, whilst 40% are for groups of fewer
than 20, only 3% are for more than 300 delegates. According to the same
survey, small executive meetings (30%), training (29%), general
management (15%) and sales or product launches (13%) are the main
reasons for holding conferences. Also, if you need "hands-on" experience,
there is no better way of going for it than in a conventional conference. For
example, what IBM & LOTUS have done during the Work group
Computing conferences held in London 93 and 94.
 
 
            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
 
 
7. DEFINITIONS
(Extracted from Seekings, David (1992) How to Organize Effective
Conferences and Meetings. London: Kogan Page Ltd.)
 
 
Conference, Convention and Congress => Professional Conference
Organisers tend to use the word to describe the larger event. Conferences
often last for several days and may attract hundreds or even thousands of
delegates. They may involve complex social programmes, exhibitions and
displays. In the hotel industry this word describes any meeting in a hotel. In
America, convention is preferred, and in continental Europe congress is the
usual English equivalent.
 
 
Meeting => usually a much smaller event, often involving a few executives
discussing business round a boardroom table. It is also used to describe
conferences, meetings and seminars in a collective manner.
 
 
Seminar => small to medium sized gatherings, from a dozen to around 150
people. Normally describes a one or two day events designed to educate or
inform delegates and to discuss matters of common concern.
 
 
Symposium => similar to a seminar except that it addresses a single subject
with a less formal two-way flow of information. Note that the Oxford
English Dictionary defines as "after-dinner drinking party, with wine and
conversation", a little bit too far.
 
 
Colloquium => where one or more academic specialists deliver lectures on
a topic and then answer questions on the subject. It is invariably an
"academic" event.
 
 
Workshop => similar to a symposium and involves a small gathering of
people to discuss specific topics, to exchange ideas or to solve particular
problems. Note the distinction between the workshop and symposium,
where the flow of information is primarily between all the delegates, the
seminar and colloquium, at which the flow of information is primarily from
the rostrum to the delegate, and the meeting, which is usually called to
discuss matters and to reach collective decisions.
 
 
Training Programmes => typically, involving 15 to 20 executives and
lasting five working days.
 
 
Launch => a "show" to introduce an audience to a new company product or
service.
 
 
Show or Production => spectacular events involving multimedia and even
live performers (dancers and so on).
 
 
Programme => used to describe the schedule of events within a conference,
sometimes an event, or series of events.
 
 
Road Show => a programme where the same event is staged in several
different venues.
 
 
Presentation => describes the formal process of telling the audience
something.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 5 Sep 1994 11:21:30 EDT
Reply-To:     Ann Okerson 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Science Special Section on Internet
 
 
The 12 August 1994 issue of the prestigious journal SCIENCE (of the AAAS
organization in Washington, DC) carries a special section of articles on
electronic networks/computing and science (pp.  879-914).  It's worth a
look for its generally upbeat overview of the kinds of important
activities that broad-based network communcations are facilitating and
enhancing.
 
It is the lead article, "Culture Shock on the Networks," that reminds
one of the recent "subversive" discussions here, though.  The subtitle
is, "An influx of new users and cultures could threaten the Internet's
tradition of open infomration exchange, while commercialization is
raising fears that pricing changs will squeeze e-mail and database
browsing." The article expands on these themes and what it says is true:
large economic and political forces *and* enormous growth are pressuring
the system we have known, a system which is beginning a period of great
change.  We do not know what the future NII will look like.
 
Quoted is Rick Weingarten, executive director of the Computing Research
Association here in DC and a strong advocate of the public interest.
"What's the life expectancy of the culture of open information exchange
if users have to pay a toll for every byte they send [NB: which, btw, is
indeed the position of a number of publishing spokespeople]? ...  We
have to make sure that some public space is preserved.  Otherwise,
research, education, museums, and libraries really could get trampled."
 
"There is tremendous distrust and worry in the community about how this
all working out," says Scott Shenker of the Xerox Palo Alto Research
Center (PARC), who feels that some sort of usage pricing is inevitable.
 
The period of transition does indeed raises many such concerns and makes
me, for one, less than sanguine that the indefinite continuation of the
freely accessible world that Harnad, Ginsparg, Odlyzko, etc.  imagine is
much assured.  If such access is not continued, then things will simply
cost a whole lot more than all the projections -- which I want to
believe but feel are somewhat unrealistic.  It is important that we not
only *use* the Internet for new ways of communicating research and
scholarship and ideas, but that we also participate, however we can, in
the telecommunications policy debates at whatever level we are able, so
that widespread, cheap use can easily continue.  The government doesn't
just do things on its own -- it R US and the more voices that keep
saying it, the better for the education, science, scholarly and library
community.
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
ann@cni.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 08:56:06 EDT
Reply-To:     Prof Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Prof Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Naylor on Paying the Piper
 
 
From: "B.Naylor" 
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 1994 18:15:21 +0100 (BST)
 
I'm interested to see that the question of charging for the use of the
INTERNET has popped up again. I have to say that if it does once again
go away it will only be temporary. I don't think that the argument
about the flea on the tail of the dog will eventually carry decisive
weight. From the way that dogs behave, I get the impression that
they're well aware that fleas are about and they're going to "make them
pay", in their case by some pretty fundamental disturbance.
 
One of the reasons why some librarians are perhaps more phlegmatic
about this prospect is that we have been paying for online access to
some journals (namely, secondary sources such as indexing and
abstracting tools) for twenty years or more. We have already made the
migration from an exclusively pay as you use or just in time tariff
framework, to one which (via CD-ROM etc) allows us to mix pay as you
use and pay up front (just in case) in accordance with what we perceive
as our best interests, and the best interests of our users. We have
even been paying for some information sources (eg in the field of law)
which are crucial primary sources and not available in any other form
except the electronic form, for about fifteen years. It's not clear to
me why the growth (dramatic, I agree) in our ability to access
information over the networks should be predicated on an assumption of
a change in cost recovery practices which are already quite well
established over more than a decade, albeit in a relatively small (but
very important) part of the sector.
 
While I am on the ether, could I revert to the question of esoteric
versus trade-scholarly, on which there has been some previous
discussion? One factor making for differences in the debate between
those on the two opposite sides of the pond is the great difference in
the number of current journals taken. For example, the University of
Wisconsin takes something like seven or eight times as many journals
currently as the University of Southampton (something like 45,000 as
against 6,000 according to the most recent figures I have seen). And
many other big American research libraries are in the twenty odd or
thirty odd thousand current subscriptions range. So it wouldn't
surprise me if they carry a lot more esoteric material by comparison
with their trade- scholarly accessions than we do. Certainly, not all
our journals are used as heavily as the protestations of some of our
scholars at the prospect of their cancellation might imply. But we are
too inclined to forget this pretty stark difference between the big
American research libraries (like Princeton I would guess, though they
didn't cite their number of current journals in the source I used).
 
Another important concept that has to be weighed in this discussion (as
I have mentioned in previous papers I have given) is the concept of
redundancy. One simple way of pointing it up runs as follows: "If all
papers worth publishing are to get published, it is inevitable that
some papers not worth publishing will get published." The redundancy
principle works in lots of walks of life (hospital beds, seats on
trains etc etc); it is a factor of the human condition. The point that
follows is that the esoteric papers should not be in any way separated
off from the others; they constitute an essential part of the whole
scholarly context.  One should no more do that than one should say:
"We'll have two constituencies of theatre, one where only the plays
that are going to survive down the years will get mounted, the other
for the rest."
 
One of the essential filtering processes will be: what are people
prepared to pay for?
 
Bernard Naylor
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Stevan Harnad (harnad@soton.ac.uk
 
I disagree with Bernard on the same points that have come up before,
so I will try to put it differently so as not to repeat myself:
 
> From: "B.Naylor" 
>
> One of the reasons why some librarians are perhaps more phlegmatic
> about this prospect is that we have been paying for online access to
> some journals (namely, secondary sources such as indexing and
> abstracting tools) for twenty years or more...  It's not clear to
> me why the growth (dramatic, I agree) in our ability to access
> information over the networks should be predicated on an assumption of
> a change in cost recovery practices which are already quite well
> established over more than a decade, albeit in a relatively small (but
> very important) part of the sector.
 
The fact that we are in the habit of paying for things when we have no
choice is hardly relevant to what we will be inclined to do when we do
have a choice. But I must repeat: text for which there was a paying
market in paper (such as indexing/abstracting tools, which become even
more valuable in electronic form) will continue to have a paying
market on the Net, and there is no reason it should not continue to be
sold, on the classical trade model. (Hence the above example, besides
being a minoritarian outlier in its proportion of the paper corpus, is
also highly unrepresentative.) The issue is text for which there is no
paying market, even on paper; text that the libraries and universities
are ALREADY subsidizing now (but in a highly Rube-Goldberg way, with
hostage library budgets).
 
> "If all papers worth publishing are to get published, it is inevitable
> that some papers not worth publishing will get published." The
> redundancy principle works in lots of walks of life (hospital beds,
> seats on trains etc etc); it is a factor of the human condition. The
> point that follows is that the esoteric papers should not be in any way
> separated off from the others; they constitute an essential part of the
> whole scholarly context. One should no more do that than one should
> say: "We'll have two constituencies of theatre, one where only the
> plays that are going to survive down the years will get mounted, the
> other for the rest."
 
Unfortunately, as pointed out when this same kind of inference was
made by Frank Quinn, this reasoning is circular. There is very little
correlation between the market-value of scientific/scholarly writing
and its scientific/scholarly value. Hence "esoteric" does not mean of
lesser epistemic value, it just means of lesser MARKET-value. Nor are
redundancy and esotericity that tightly coupled. Most of it may be
chaff, but what's not chaff is not measured by whether it's bought, but
by whether it breeds: whether further knowledge is built on it. And the
principle (if it's true, and it probably is) that we must be prepared
to countenence a high chaff/wheat ratio in all fields of human endeavor
in order to ensure the inevitable proportion of wheat -- again suggests
that something other than market indicators might be desirable here.
 
> One of the essential filtering processes will be: what are people
> prepared to pay for?
 
Indeed; and the likes of myself will always be looking out for the
fate of what people are NOT prepared to pay for. Fortunately, we have in
the skies a much stronger potential ally than in the Faustian medium
of the paper trade...
 
Stevan Harnad
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 08:56:36 EDT
Reply-To:     MMB1 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MMB1 
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject:      Full-Screen Color Monitors
 
Hi! The documentation department of our company is considering purchasing
full-screen color monitors within the next few weeks/months, but no one
knows of any that will work with our equipment setup and requirements.
(We're also a little gun-shy because we've had some bad experiences with
some Sigma wide-screen monitors a couple of years ago.)
 
If you have any advice on what's good (and conversely, what to avoid!), I
look forward to hearing from you. If you have a recommendation, please
list the video driver you're using! Also, we do have a budget, so pricing
information is also appreciated.
 
Monitor description:
- 20" ultrahigh resolution color monitor
 
Must be compatible with:
- 486 or Pentium PCs
- Microsoft Windows-based programs (Framemaker, Ventura Publisher, - Corel
Draw, Word for Windows, Excel)
- LanMan networks (which are memory hogs!)
- HP Laserjet printer drivers
- Screen capture programs such as Hijaak Pro
 
Thanks in advance,
 
 
Madeline Bechtold
mmb@qad.com
MMB1@aol.com
74763.3243@compuserve.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 08:57:01 EDT
Reply-To:     MMB1 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         MMB1 
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject:      Screen Captures (Editable!)
 
Hi! Does anyone know of a screen capture program (or method) that produces
editable screen captures? We have a need to capture character-based
screens in which we can edit the content of fields (as well as the
fonts/font sizes).
 
We are currently using Hijaak Pro, but the limitation seems to be that the
screen captures aren't editable. (I haven't been able to get the .IGF to
.TXT ASCII conversion to work!) We have also done Windows copies to the
Clipboard, then pasted to Word or Powerpoint and converted the fonts, but
the screens aren't as high a quality as the Hijaak Pro captures.
 
Thanks in advance,
 
 
Madeline Bechtold
mmb@qad.com
MMB1@aol.com
74763.3243@compuserve.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 08:57:23 EDT
Reply-To:     Jaap.Jasperse@vuw.ac.nz
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Jaap.Jasperse@vuw.ac.nz
Subject:      Is _Genome Science & Technology_ up and running?
 
Last year I saw some documentation on a scientific journal _Genome Science
& Technology_ that was to be published exclusively on CD-ROM, from 1994
onwards.
 
Could anyone please confirm this journal is being published; if so - how
often it has come out, and what the subscription details are? Many thanks,
JJ
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
                      J. A. Jasperse, PhD   ["Yahp YAHS-pur-suh"]
 
Scientific Editing / CD-ROM development  | Lecturing Information Technology
SIR Publishing, 11 Turnbull St, Thorndon | Dept of Library and Info. Studies
P. O. Box 399, Wellington, New Zealand   | Victoria University of Wellington
Phone +64-4-472 7421, Fax 473 1841       | Ph. +64-4-495 5020  Fax 496 5446
                                           Mon-Fri in September
(jaap@rsnz.govt.nz)                        jaap@matai.vuw.ac.nz
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 08:57:44 EDT
Reply-To:     Prof Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Prof Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      More on pipe costs and quality control
 
From: amo@com.att.research (Andrew Odlyzko)
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 94 20:52 EDT
Subject: Science article
 
I agree with [Stevan Harnad's] three claims, all of which say that Ann
Okerson's alarm is not justified. The article in the August 12 issue of
Science that Ann cites is rather confused on the two factors that are
leading to changes in the way Internet is run: (a) participation of
commercial organizations, and (b) growth of multimedia services
(including Mosaic usage as well as the more exotic videoconferencing).
It is factor (b) that is much more likely to force institution of a
pricing scheme because of its dramatically higher bandwidth
requirements. A better discussion than in the Science article of why
this is so, and what kind of pricing schemes might be adopted can be
found in
 
  MacKie-Mason, J.K. and H. R. Varian, Some economics of the
  Internet, in "Networks, Infrastructure and the New Task for
  Regulation}, W. Sichel, ed., to appear. (Available via gopher or
  ftp together with other related papers from
  gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu in /pub/Papers.)
 
Some simple back-of-the-envelope calculations show that the fears
that Ann and some of the experts quoted in Science express about
the Internet being priced out of the reach of scholars are baseless.
Reasonable videoconferencing systems run at about 400 kilobits
per second. This is about 50,000 bytes per second, or 200 MB
(megabytes) per hours. Now a typical paper is somewhere between
250,000 bytes (uncompressed PostScript) and 20,000 bytes (compressed TeX).
In any case, the transmission of a one-hour videoconference takes
about as much capacity as the transmission of between 1,000 and
10,000 papers. Further, as the Science article does point out,
the videoconference transmission cannot tolerate any significant
delays, whereas paper transmission can. Thus any rational pricing
scheme will require substantially higher payments per byte for
videoconferencing with a service guarantee than for a "best-effort"
paper transmission that might be delayed by minutes. Thus we
can expect that transmitting a paper might cost 1/10,000 or
even 1/1,000,000 of the cost of a one-hour videoconference. (Some of
the schemes discussed in [MacKieV] involve fees only for services
with a service guarantee, which would let most scholarly communication
go through for free.) However, videoconferencing cannot cost
too much, or else it won't be used. Therefore scholarly electronic
communication will have trivial costs.
 
We might have charges based on bytes transmitted, as opposed to
capacity of the link to the Internet, but if so, the charge per
byte will be so small as not to merit attention, at least for the
kinds of transmissions that are required for publishing of today's
scholarly literature (*). If your department gets charged for
each word you write with a pen the department provides, would
it affect how much scratch paper you filled with your jottings,
if the total charge for a few months' work still came to the $1
cost of a cartridge refill?
 
Andrew Odlyzko
 
(*) The arguments above apply only to traditional publications,
since that is all that is relevant in evaluating the feasibility
of electronic versus print journals. Scholars will surely avail
themselves of the novel services, such as videoconferences, and
presumably their usage of such will be rationed by price. We
can already see substantial loads on the network generated by
genetic and astronomy data. Even mathematicians are becoming
bandwidth hogs. For example, I cited the average paper as being
20,000 bytes in compressed form. However, my colleague David
Applegate has now made available on the Internet proofs of the
optimality of some Traveling Salesman Tours (an important
combinatorial optimization problem he has been working on with
collaborators across the country) that are 20 MB each, even in
compressed form! (These proofs are not made to be checked by
people, only by computers.) There will surely be many more
such cases, as scholars do things electronically that are not
possible in print. Technical and economic constraints will
always be present, it's just that they have moved far enough
away to enable print journals to be replaced by electronic
ones at much lower cost.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
From: amo@com.att.research (Andrew Odlyzko)
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 94 21:51 EDT
To: quinn@edu.vt.math.calvin
Subject: Re: electronic pub. in physics
 
I don't think [Frank Quinn and I] differ much on what should be done. I
agree with [Frank] completely that "we should be proactive to try to
minimize the discomfort of the transition." However, the picture [Frank]
presented in "Consequences of electronic publication in Theoretical
Physics" seemed to be too bleak. Even if indeed the trends [Frank] describe[s]
do continue uninterrupted in theoretical physics, without any counter-
vailing forces coming into play, it's not clear how much that means for
other areas, such as mathematics. {Frank himself] says that the refereeing
system in theoretical physics is broken. If we accept that, then it is
no wonder that there is no great rush to set up a rigorous system for
electronic publication in that field. I do not think that
mathematicians, say, should allow that to happen, and I have been
arguing for an even more rigorous standard for e-journals.
 
I will spend a bit more time on [Frank's] second point:
 
  ao> A final point I would like to make is related to Paul [Ginsparg]'s
  ao> comment that with electronic publications we should aim "for a system
  ao> in which much *more* stringent standards are applied." It is hard to
  ao> overemphasize the inadequacies of the present system.
 
fq> and go on to discuss some of these inadequacies. Please remember that
fq> not all areas are the same in this regard. Paul has been quite open
fq> that the peer review system in his area has no credibility, and is so
fq> weak that dispensing with it would be little loss. I have had some
fq> contact with his area, and this is also my impression. So indeed
fq> ANYTHING he can do will be "much *more* stringent". This is certainly
fq> not the case in topology, and is really wrong in the most stringent
fq> area I have had contact with, algebra. These areas have a whole lot
fq> to lose.
 
fq> I wonder, from your comments, if your field is more like theoretical
fq> physics than algebra in the effectiveness of quality control. Or
fq> perhaps you have not had enough contact with physics literature to
fq> appreciate what a real breakdown looks like. Anyway I urge you not to
fq> generalize too much from experiences in physics and psychology.
 
It is true that I have not had too much contact with physics literature,
but what I had did not inspire me with any confidence in its editorial
and refereeing system. However, all the areas I have worked in (and
there are quite a few, such as number theory, cryptology, probability
theory, combinatorics, and a few others) have very stringent standards
as to correctness. I would venture to guess their standards are at
least as high as for algebra, at least for journal articles. (Some
of these areas do use conference proceedings extensively, but those
are recognized as not being as reliable as journals, even when they
do become the dominant mode of communication.) The journals I cited
as examples ("Discrete Mathematics," "J. Combinatorial Theory," and
"Codes, Designs, and Cryptography") are all in discrete mathematics,
and all have stringent refereeing standards. Very few of their papers
are incorrect. When I complained about "the inadequacies of the
present system," I chose these journals precisely because they
contain rigorously checked results. My point was that they fail to
provide the signals as to significance of their results that are
often touted as a great advantage of print journals (this claim
is usually followed by the non-sequitur claim that therefore
e-journals cannot replace print ones). Because of specialization
(journals engage in "monopolistic competition," as economists
call it), it is seldom that two journals are strictly comparable,
and so the information that one can derive from where an article
is published is "noisy."
 
Andrew Odlyzko
--------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Ann Okerson 
Subject: Re: Network Management
To: amo@com.att.research
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 1994 23:00:31 -0400 (EDT)
 
Andrew [Odlyzko wrote:]
 
> I agree with [Stevan Harnad's] three claims, all of which say that Ann
> Okerson's alarm is not justified. The article in the August 12 issue of
> Science that Ann cites is rather confused on the two factors that are
> leading to changes in the way Internet is run: (a) participation of
>  commercial organizations, and (b) growth of multimedia services
> (including Mosaic usage as well as the more exotic videoconferencing).
> It is factor (b) that is much more likely to force institution of a
> pricing scheme because of its dramatically higher bandwidth requirements.
 
The SCIENCE article made both points, but with respect to [Andrew's] (a)
it is not participation of commercial organizations but the fact that
the government/NSF is getting out of the network support business pretty
much. They are continuing the process of handing the networks over to
commercial organizations, a move which will be finished by next April.
 
Both (a) and (b) will be influential, or at least that is a view
widely shared by policy makers and folks throughout the public interest
sector here. SCIENCE is reporting that, not creating the concern.
 
Ann Okerson
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Stevan Harnad (harnad@soton.ac.uk)
 
Steve Goldstein can correct me if I am wrong about this, but my
understanding is that the NSF is now supplying only 10% of the
cost of the backbone; when the Universities, which now pay 90%
take this on, it will accordingly amount to 10% more than what
they pay now. Because of the nature of network transmission, they
have not found it necessary to pass on these costs to individual
users so far, and I doubt that the additional 10% will change
matters. It is indeed, as Andrew Odlyzko has aptly suggested,
somewhat analogous to charging for ink used per word...
 
Stevan Harnad
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 11:32:55 EDT
Reply-To:     Ian Pitchford 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ian Pitchford 
Subject:      IVC Data Group forming
 
The _InterPsych Virtual Campus_ programming group is moving along.
Data will be, of course, an essential ingredient, and some help is
needed to accumulate and update it.
 
NET SURFING DATAPHILE WANTED:  Somebody who enjoys exploring the nooks
and crannies of cyberspace and is willing to come back from them to
report.  You should be able to find anything on the net with only
moderate struggle, be able to keep accurate lists of items of interest
for the IVC.  The first project is to accumulate ftp, gopher, and http
addresses.  If you've been on this list for some time, you know we have
many already.  We want more!   We are also looking for some difficult
to find data.  And we need everything maintained in an
orderly fashion.  We may not be able to find right off a person who's both a
good worm and also a good data keeper.  Maybe one person can be the worm
and the another take care of the data.  Suggestions welcome.
 
Ben
/\/\/\/\/Ben Goldhagen~~~~~~roadman@panix.com------->/\/\/\/\/
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 11:33:16 EDT
Reply-To:     ghermanp@kenyon.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         ghermanp@kenyon.edu
Subject:      Cross subsidy
 
Steven Harnad suggests that we need not worry about the cost of transmitting
text over the internet because the cost will be so much lower than the cost of
transmitting video. He postulates that the cost of video will need to be kept
low, and therefore the cost of text will be proportionately lower. Past
practice would suggest quite the opposite, that the cost of text transmission
will be close to the cost of video transmission, and the differential will
cross subsidize the cost of video, keeping video affordable. The telcos see the
real profits in video not text, so I suspect they will bump up the price of
text to lower the cost of video.
 
Paul Gherman
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 6 Sep 1994 11:33:41 EDT
Reply-To:     James O'Donnell 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         James O'Donnell 
Subject:      esoteric fleas
 
I've been reading the debate on this list with interest, and while my heart is
with those who look to a future of free information, my head is cautious.  NSF
privatizes the backbone, as Ann points out.  What happens then if Rupert
Murdoch decides to buy the company that supplies the backbone?  Are we going to
depend on the FCC to come in and *remember* that there are academics out there
and cut us a special break?  This isn't just marginal business news we're
talking about, this is the biggest new money-making playground opened up since
Japan reindustrialized after the war:  the big boys are going to be taking this
game very seriously, and they will gladly squeeze every esoteric flea for every
penny we've got.  We may be able to resist, we may be able to get some special
breaks:  but it won't come easily or automatically, and we *must* not be blase
about it.
 
Jim O'Donnell
Classics, U. of Penn
jod@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Sep 1994 12:18:09 EDT
Reply-To:     Prof Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Prof Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re: Naylor on Paying the Piper
 
                ON NECESSITY AND INVENTION
 
Bernard Naylor , quoting me, wrote:
 
  > Subject: Re: Naylor on Paying the Piper
  > Date: Tue, 6 Sep 1994 09:58:17 +0100 (BST)
  >
  sh> The issue is text for which there is no paying market, even on paper;
  sh> text that the libraries and universities are ALREADY subsidizing now
  sh> (but in a highly Rube-Goldberg way, with hostage library budgets).
  >
bn> This is an interesting use of the concept of "subsidy". I doubt whether
bn> the purchase of academic journals by libraries has any elements
bn> amounting to subsidy which economists could not point out are readily
bn> perceivable in other settings where goods with "value" are acquired in
bn> return for payment. If academe has a false sense of values in respect
bn> of journals (or some journals), then it should set about correcting
bn> that - as there are some tentative signs it is in the process of
bn> starting to do.
  >
  sh> There is very little correlation between the market-value of
  sh> scientific/scholarly writing and its scientific/scholarly value.
  sh> Hence "esoteric" does not mean of lesser epistemic value, it just
  sh>  means of lesser MARKET-value.
  >
bn> I think the marketeers (who are my paymasters) would not
bn> entertain this assertion for a moment. They would say: "If it's
bn> worth having, it's worth paying for. People who try to deny the
bn> links between valuing something enough to want it and being
bn> prepared to pay for it are just trying to have their cake and eat
bn> it." No doubt, they wouldn't claim that everything is correctly
bn> valued in the market place, but they wouldn't see that as any
bn> reason for not letting markets work. On the contrary; they would
bn> say that the operation of the market should be reviewed in order
bn> to make it work better. As you say, the wheat/chaff ratio is a
bn> fact of life in so many areas. Paying for things (or not being
bn> prepared to pay for them) is one way of sorting out the one from
bn> the other which is well established. Naturally, people who write
bn> articles for scientific journals might like to think that this
bn> one area is so different that different processes should apply.
bn> I just don't think the case has been made.
 
I regret that I must keep disagreeing with my new Southampton colleague
before we have even had a chance to meet nonvirtually, but there are
two crucial points that are either being systematically misunderstood or
have so far managed to escape notice:
 
(1) I have not for a moment suggested that, when there is something
that people want and need that they can and must pay for, they should
not or will not. What I am saying is that whereas a circumstance
conforming to this did indeed obtain in the case of paper (esoteric
scholarly/scientific) periodical publication, it no longer obtains in
the electronic-only medium (and to keep speaking or thinking of it as
if it did does not make it so; it is simply a failure to take a proper
measure of the radically new circumstances): To spell it out: it is the
"must" that no longer applies (given the true per-page costs of
electronic-only scholarly periodical publication, which I estimate at
below 25% percent of the per-page cost in paper). There is now a CHOICE
available to the consumer that never existed before. Say whatever you
want about market forces, if there is a way to get something
(practically) for free, there is nothing (except duress or opacity)
that will make consumers continue to pay for it. And that brings me to
the second crucial point:
 
(2) Even NOW, in paper, the consumers (i.e., the readers) of the
esoteric periodical corpus are NOT the ones paying for it (hence it is
with justification that I say that their consumption is ALREADY
"subsidized" -- by the university libraries, for the most part). All I
am proposing is that this subsidy would be much more sensibly placed
up-front, once the per-page charges shrink to their electronic scale:
Let esoteric AUTHORS be subsidized for publishing, rather than esoteric
readers for reading. The consequence will be more (and, if properly
peer reviewed, better) esoteric publishing and a GREAT deal more
esoteric reading (currently constrained by both the cost and the
inconvenience of paper). And the entire scholarly/scientific community
(as well as humanity as a whole, if you believe that learned inquiry is
a good thing) will be the beneficiaries.
 
Ceterum, censeo: market-value is not the proper measure of scholarly
value (so it's NOT just a matter of weeding out the bad buys among
libraries' current periodical acquisition lists!). The essential
esotericity of human inquiry is fundamentally at odds with mass-market
thinking, but passons...
 
Stevan Harnad
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Sep 1994 12:18:27 EDT
Reply-To:     Prof Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Prof Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Paying the Piper: More matchbox guesstimates
 
From: amo@com.att.research (Andrew Odlyzko)
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 94 06:52 EDT
To: ann@org.cni (Ann Okerson)
Subject: Network Management
 
As Stevan has already mentioned in the message he posted a couple of
hours ago, the fact that "the government/NSF is getting out of the
network support business" does not matter much. Too little money came
from that source for it to be the dominant factor. If the Internet were
still to be occupied just by academic researchers, and there was no
dramatic growth in the demand for new services, I expect that the
present service providers would continue the existing policy of
charging by the capacity of the link to the Internet that they provide.
The costs of implementing tolls are considerable, and these regional
networks have been doing well with old policies.
 
The two factors influencing the evolution of the Internet are (to
quote from my earlier message)
 
(a) participation of commercial organizations,
 
(b) growth of multimedia services (including Mosaic usage as well as
   the more exotic videoconferencing).
 
Each is leading to changes. Factor (a) yields a much higher growth rate
than would prevail if only academic organizations were involved. It
also leads to incidents such as the immigration lawyers' flooding news
groups with ads for their services. To prevent that, some sort of
access controls might be needed. However, the growth rates for
traditional text transmissions from these new commercial entrants to
the Internet are not all that dramatic, and might have been
accommodated with traditional pricing schemes (by capacity size, or, in
terms that librarians use, "just in case"). On the other hand, factor
(b) appears to force the introduction of a pricing scheme soon. This
would be so even if only academic researchers were involved. The reason
is the dramatically higher bandwidth requirements of the new services.
The videoconferencing example I cited in last night's message requires
0.4 Mbs (megabits per second). The Internet backbone operated until
recently at 45 Mbs and the trans-Atlantic link at 1.5 Mbs (although
they have probably both been upgraded by now). Relatively rich
institutions have T1 links at 1.5 Mbs, and many poorer ones only 0.056
Mbs. Clearly the infrastructure we have now is not adequate to support
videoconferencing on a large scale, and so some sort of control is
needed. (There are also fascinating technical issues about congestion
controls on networks with multimedia traffic, which require new routing
schemes to be developed, but that is another issue.)
 
I referred to the Science article on "confused" because it did
not point out the relative importance of factors (a) and (b) to
the changes that are taking place and are likely to occur soon.
For example, when researchers talk about "loss of innocence,"
they often mean only the troubles with lawyers advertising on
news groups, which is part of (a).
 
Here is one final argument that should allay the "dollars for every
byte" concerns about prices for Internet services. According to that
August 12 issue of Science, the Internet traffic is around 13 terabytes
per month (tera here is 10^12), or around 150 terabytes per year. The
total charges for running the backbone and the regional service
providers seem to be around $ 200 M per year, with about $ 20 M coming
from the explicit NSF subsidy that is being phased out. (There is also
indirect goverment support for development as well as for access
charges to the regionals, which often come at least partially from the
overhead on goverment grants and contracts, but we'll ignore those, as
they are being threatened with cutoff.) Hence if we tried to recover
present costs by charging a uniform price for each byte, the charge per
byte would be $ 1.5*10^(-6). A typical email message of 2,000 bytes
would then cost all of $ 0.003. A paper of 50,000 bytes would be more,
$ 0.075. When I sent out the latest draft of my "Tragic loss ..."
essay, which was almost 200,000 bytes, my mailing list had around 300
addresses, so this giant mailing of 60 MB would cost $ 90. Given the
rapidly decreasing prices for networks, I feel it is safe to conclude
that tolls on the NII are not going to be large enough to impede
scholarly communication.
 
Andrew Odlyzko
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:     Tue, 6 Sep 1994 11:33:16 EDT
From: ghermanp@edu.kenyon (Paul Gherman)
Subject:   Cross subsidy
To: Multiple recipients of list VPIEJ-L 
 
[Andrew Odlyzko] suggests that we need not worry about the cost of
transmitting text over the internet because the cost will be so much
lower than the cost of transmitting video. He postulates that the cost
of video will need to be kept low, and therefore the cost of text will
be proportionately lower. Past practice would suggest quite the
opposite, that the cost of text transmission will be close to the cost
of video transmission, and the differential will cross subsidize the
cost of video, keeping video affordable. The telcos see the real
profits in video not text, so I suspect they will bump up the price of
text to lower the cost of video.
 
Paul Gherman
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Tue, 6 Sep 1994 11:33:41 EDT
From: "James O'Donnell" 
Subject:  esoteric fleas
To: Multiple recipients of list VPIEJ-L 
 
I've been reading the debate on this list with interest, and while my
heart is with those who look to a future of free information, my head
is cautious. NSF privatizes the backbone, as Ann points out. What
happens then if Rupert Murdoch decides to buy the company that supplies
the backbone? Are we going to depend on the FCC to come in and
*remember* that there are academics out there and cut us a special
break? This isn't just marginal business news we're talking about, this
is the biggest new money-making playground opened up since Japan
reindustrialized after the war: the big boys are going to be taking
this game very seriously, and they will gladly squeeze every esoteric
flea for every penny we've got. We may be able to resist, we may be
able to get some special breaks: but it won't come easily or
automatically, and we *must* not be blase about it.
 
Jim O'Donnell
Classics, U. of Penn
jod@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Sep 1994 12:18:45 EDT
Reply-To:     Hal.Varian@umich.edu
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Hal Varian 
Subject:      Re: Paying the Piper: More matchbox guesstimates
 
Sorry to butt in on the discussion, but I've been doing lots of work in this
area and thought that I might be able to help.  Those of you with Mosaic
might want to look at my page on the "Economics of the Internet" at
http://gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu.  The "Economic FAQs about the Internet"
avaialble there is especially relevant.
 
ghermanp@edu.kenyon (Paul Gherman) suggests:
 
> Past practice would suggest quite the opposite, that the cost of text
> transmission will be close to the cost of video transmission, and the
> differential will cross subsidize the cost of video, keeping video
> affordable. The telcos see the real profits in video not text, so I
> suspect they will bump up the price of text to lower the cost of video.
 
 
The problem is that there is no way to do this: bits is bits.  The current
Internet treats all packets the same.  Future protocols will probably want to
treat different types of data differently, but whatever pricing scheme is
invoked will have to be (warning, economics jargon coming) "incentive
compatible" since it is trivial to disguise data: if video is subsidized, I
can just create "video packets" that contain text.
 
"James O'Donnell"  asks:
 
> What happens then if Rupert Murdoch decides to buy the company that
> supplies the backbone?
 
 
There are currently 4 backbone suppliers ANS, Alternet, PSInet, and
SprintLink and more entry is expected.  In fact, all that it takes to enter
the business is some money to rent a telephone line, a few routers,
and---most importantly---some engineering expertise.
 
---
Hal.Varian@umich.edu    Hal Varian
voice: 313-764-2364     Dept of Economics
fax:   313-764-2364     Univ of Michigan
                        Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Sep 1994 12:19:10 EDT
Reply-To:     "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Subject:      Re: esoteric fleas
 
James O'Donnell  writes
 
>I've been reading the debate on this list with interest, and while my heart is
>with those who look to a future of free information, my head is cautious.  NSF
>privatizes the backbone, as Ann points out.  What happens then if Rupert
>Murdoch decides to buy the company that supplies the backbone?  Are we going to
>depend on the FCC to come in and *remember* that there are academics out there
>and cut us a special break?  This isn't just marginal business news we're
>talking about, this is the biggest new money-making playground opened up since
>Japan reindustrialized after the war:  the big boys are going to be taking this
>game very seriously, and they will gladly squeeze every esoteric flea for every
>penny we've got.  We may be able to resist, we may be able to get some special
>breaks:  but it won't come easily or automatically, and we *must* not be blase
>about it.
 
Surely, even now, net access is not free. In Australia each organisation
pays a charge for net access. If your organisation does not pass that
charge onto you, then it apears to be free, but it isn't. So, in the new
world of user pays, this charge will be based on usage/bandwidth rather
than a flat fee, and this is the issue that I believe will hurt most.
 
bobj
 
 
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist, Knowledge-Based Systems
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus,
          North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone: +612 325 3100  Fax: +612 325 3101
email: bob.jansen@syd.dit.csiro.au
-------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Sep 1994 12:19:41 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Economics of the Internet
 
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 94 15:29:12 -0400
From: Hal Varian 
 
Sorry to butt in on the discussion, but I've been doing lots of work in
this area and thought that I might be able to help. Those of you with
Mosaic might want to look at my page on the "Economics of the Internet"
at http://gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu. The "Economic FAQs about the
Internet" available there is especially relevant.
 
ghermanp@edu.kenyon (Paul Gherman) suggests:
 
> Past practice would suggest quite the opposite, that the cost of text
> transmission will be close to the cost of video transmission, and the
> differential will cross subsidize the cost of video, keeping video
> affordable. The telcos see the real profits in video not text, so I
> suspect they will bump up the price of text to lower the cost of video.
 
The problem is that there is no way to do this: bits is bits. The
current Internet treats all packets the same. Future protocols will
probably want to treat different types of data differently, but
whatever pricing scheme is invoked will have to be (warning, economics
jargon coming) "incentive compatible" since it is trivial to disguise
data: if video is subsidized, I can just create "video packets" that
contain text.
 
"James O'Donnell"  asks:
 
> What happens then if Rupert Murdoch decides to buy the company that
> supplies the backbone?
 
There are currently 4 backbone suppliers ANS, Alternet, PSInet, and
SprintLink and more entry is expected. In fact, all that it takes to
enter the business is some money to rent a telephone line, a few
routers, and---most importantly---some engineering expertise.
 
Hal.Varian@umich.edu  Hal Varian
voice: 313-764-2364   Dept of Economics
fax:  313-764-2364   Univ of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 8 Sep 1994 08:31:55 EDT
Reply-To:     SBURRIGH@LIBRARY.WRIGHT.EDU
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Scott Burright 
Organization: Wright State University
Subject:      Indexing of e-journals
 
Library policies regarding electronic publications (e.g. Cornell's
and VPI's) seem to agree that they should be treated similarly to
print sources for the purposes of selection, acquisition, and
cataloging.  In the near term, this brings up a few practical questions:
 
* Are any of these sources yet recognized by the mainstream
indexing/abstracting services, e.g. Wilson, Bowker, etc?
 
* If so, how do I tell which ones?  Are any listed in Ulrich's?
 
* Is OCLC or any of its member institutions cataloging these sources?
 
* Where are these sources reviewed?
 
Forgive me if these are FAQs, but I couldn't find the answers in any
file.  I hope someone out there can shed some light on this for me.
 
 
Scott Burright
Networked Info Resources Librarian
Wright State University
Dayton, OH 45435
sburrigh@library.wright.edu
 
     **** REMEMBER: Never send cash by e-mail! ****
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 9 Sep 1994 08:15:59 EDT
Reply-To:     Sandra Henderson 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Sandra Henderson 
Subject:      ejournals/ and secondary services
 
Scott asked about coverage of ejournals/ by the secondary services.
 
I don't know what major commercial indexing services are doing, but the US
National Library of Medicine is indexing an ejournal (Online Journal of
Current Clinical Trials).
Here in Australia, where the section I manage is responsible for indexing
Aust journals in the social sciences for the APAIS index, we are regularly
scanning 3 "scholarly" Australian e-journals for items in scope for the
index, and have identified one of those journals as one we'll be indexing
regularly.
The Australian National Bibliography, also published within my section,
has included cataloguing records for those journals as they've appeared
online, and we are also actively trying to track down other
e-publications.  There is a problem for us here, in that while normal
print publications come to the National Library (and hence into the
National Bibliography) via legal deposit regulations, the Aust. Copyright
Act, which includes the legal deposit provisions, hasn't yet caught up
with electronic publishing, so those publishing material electronically
don't routinely ensure that we are advised of the publication, or, in the
case of items published on diskette, don't routinely supply us with a copy.
 
                                          ---..____________
Sandra Henderson                        / .  )             \\
Manager                                /      )             ||
National Bibliographic Publications    | |/ _)              ||
National Library of Australia          |/ - \    /    \     ||
Ph 61 6 262 1523                      /||    |  |\_____\    /\
Fax 61 6 2731180                        \\   |  |       |  |
Email shenders@nla.gov.au            |||||||||||||||||||||||||||
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 9 Sep 1994 08:16:16 EDT
Reply-To:     HM Woodward 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         HM Woodward 
Subject:      indexing of e-serial
 
In reply to Scott Burright's questions about the indexing of e-serials,
I think he raises some interesting questions.
While not claiming to have researched this area exhaustively, I have
investigated some of these questions for a paper recently submitted
to "Serials Review". Here's what I found:
 
* some i&a services do now include a few e-serials. These include
"Index Medicus", "MLA Bibliography" and "ERIC". However, the entries
are poor. For example, no information is given about how to access
the title and in some cases it is not even entirely clear that the
titles is only available in electronic format.
 
* Ulrich is making an attempt to cover e-serials in its section
"Serials available online" (Vol.4). It would be interesting to see
how many of the 45 e-serials listed in the "ARL Directory of Electronic
Newsletters, Serials and Discussion Lists" are included in Ulrichs.
I will check this out - unless anyone else out there has already done
it.
 
* OCLC is cataloguing all e-serials with an ISSN.
 
* I am not sure about *reviews* of e-serials, but certainly the ARL
Directory along with it's updating service "New electronic journals
and newsletters" does provide a cetralised listing of title.
 
I for one, would be most interested in hearing from anyone else who
has additional information on this topic.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hazel Woodward, Information Services, Pilkington Library
Phone no: (0509) 222352            Fax no: (0509) 234806
Email: H.M.Woodward@lut.ac.uk
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 12 Sep 1994 11:35:12 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re: Paying the Piper: More Matchbox Guesstimates
 
Date:   Sat, 10 Sep 1994 14:43:59 -0400
From: quinn@edu.vt.math (Frank Quinn)
 
This is another reply to the questions about charges for internet use. It
seems to me that there are actually several similar questions being asked,
and the answers suggested don't always address the intended question. Maybe
this is why the issue keeps coming up. Anyway three variations are
discussed here.
 
First, charges for use of the internet itself, without regard to the
content of the message. Such charges may be coming, but I believe the right
perspective is provided by thinking of them as postage, rather than
subscriptions. Right now it looks free because our institutions have "bulk
mail" arrangements. But even if it changes to a per-piece charge it will be
small (note 1).
 
The second variation concerns charges related to the content. These are in
the form of site licenses, individual connect charges, or delivery fees.
None of these seem likely to become widespread. Individual charges shift
the expense from libraries to the individuals, and the individuals I know
will have no enthusiasm for this. Use would plummet since browsers won't
pay. The "subversive proposal" mechanism would also take a toll: People
would find other, free, ways to offer and obtain the information. As for
site licenses, it has already been observed that the market for new
journals in any format has collapsed. Expensive electronic startups (e.g.
Online Journal of Clinical Trials) have not fared well for this reason if
no other. This narrows the possibilities down to paper journals converting
to electronic format and trying to retain the subscription base. Does
anyone know of a successful example (scholarly journal)? The ones I know
about (e.g. "TULIP") are still piggy-backed on paper subscriptions. In any
case there is no mass movement in this direction, and publishers (at least)
don't seem to have any confidence in it.
 
The third variation on the question is not so sharply formulated. Currently
we pay a lot for access to information, through journal subscriptions.
Soon, we are led to believe, we will have nearly free access to it all.
Surely this is too good to be true, and someone will find a way to
re-institute charges? Even if the arguments above are correct, isn't
something else we can't forsee bound to happen?
 
Put this way we see good news and bad news. The good news is that yes it
really will be essentially free. The bad news is that we will get what we
pay for: the old system is expensive partly because it adds value during
the transmission process, and the new system doesn't. As far as I can tell
nothing has been improved by being sent out over the net. The problem is
not that they will find another way to charge us. The problem is that the
added value we used to buy, and were willing to pay for, may no longer be
available for sale.  (note 2)
 
=== notes ===
 
Note 1) I do NOT, however, buy the argument that, since the market will be
driven by video-on-demand, our relatively insignificant bandwidth
requirements must be almost free. The video-on-demand idea is shaping up in
an unattractive way: see "Dreamnet", Charles Piller, Macworld October 1994.
Some proposals have nearly all the center-to-user bandwidth dedicated to
video, and the user-to-center bandwidth so spread out that it will scarcely
match current internet capabilities. A very poor medium for scholarship!
Maybe there is a bit of comfort though: with such poor functionality in the
commercial versions the academic network will probably stay intact and
separate for a long time.
 
Note 2)  Most people feel some subsitute will evolve for the value added by
print publication (particular quality control via peer review). Paul
Ginsparg, for instance, seems to agree that the total "archive" will be of
lower quality without quality control at the front end of the process. He
suggests that instead of CONTROL, we will have GUIDES which will develop as
an "overlay" on top of this archive, and point us toward the good stuff in
it. "Overlay guides" already exist in the form of review and survey
articles, and selective bibliographies. It is an attractive and hopeful
idea that this activity should increase and diversify. But incentives and a
support mechanism (eg. a way to redirect current subscription budgets to
pay for it) are still missing. Conyers Herring in 1968 (Physics Today)
argued strongly that more reviews were needed even then. The situation is
worse now, 26 years later, but reviews have failed to materialize in the
necessary quantity. Why should this trend reverse itself when the
literature goes electronic?
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 12 Sep 1994 11:35:34 EDT
Reply-To:     Jack Reynolds 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Jack Reynolds 
Organization: NETCOM On-line Communication Services (408 261-4700 guest)
Subject:      A call for documents...
 
 
A call for documents...
 
Interact is soliciting for the submission of computer-readable documents of
all types for addition to the Interact On-line Information System.
 
All submitted documents are immediately cataloged by company name, author,
title, Dewy Decimal Number (if applicable), and several key words. They become
instantly available for down-load to anyone with a modem, 24 hours a day at no
charge to the author.
 
Interact pays a 50% royalty to authors who have their documents down-loaded.
The price of the down-load is determined by the author at the time of the
document's submission.
 
The Interact On-line Information System is the only public access server that
allows anyone to publish documents free of charge and receive monthly royalty
payments.
 
Interact is dedicated to providing on-line publishing services to all writers,
composers, painters, photographers, software developers, and information
providers free of charge.
 
To learn more about how to publish your documents, use your modem to call
1-714-378-4704 (8 N 1).
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 13 Sep 1994 08:51:48 EDT
Reply-To:     Gail Clement 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Gail Clement 
Subject:      Re: indexing of e-serials
 
 
Having researched this topic for an article to be published in the Oct. 1994
issue of DATABASE ("Evolutation of a Species: Science Journals Published on the
Internet"), I have a few comments to add to Hazel Woodward's remarks about
indexing of e-serials.
 
>some i&a services do now include a few e-serials. These include
>"Index Medicus", "MLA Bibliography" and "ERIC". However, the entries
>are poor. For example, no information is given about how to access
>the title and in some cases it is not even entirely clear that the
>titles is only available in electronic format.
 
Yes, indexing is spotty at best.  Large commercial e-journals, such as Online
Journal of Current Clinical Trials, are being picked by up scientific indexing
services, but many of the 'non-profit' journals, most of which have
ISSN's,  are not.
 
I recently asked a representative of ISI what their policy was on indexing
e-journals, and they are looking at them on a case-by-case basis.  So far
none have been added, but they will keep an eye on the trend.  My own gut
reaction is that because ISI is predisposed to judge value/quality by citation
counts, this creates a self-perpetuating cycle:  ISI doesn't include the
journal until it is proven to be important, as evidenced by the number of
citations to it; but without good exposure through indexing (particularly in
ISI's current awareness products, such as Current Contents), how many
researchers will find the article so they CAN cite it?
 
>* Ulrich is making an attempt to cover e-serials in its section
>"Serials available online" (Vol.4). It would be interesting to see
>how many of the 45 e-serials listed in the "ARL Directory of Electronic
>Newsletters, Serials and Discussion Lists" are included in Ulrichs.
>I will check this out - unless anyone else out there has already done
>it.
 
In my analysis of about 2 dozen peer-reviewed science/technology  journals
published on the 'Net, about half were cataloged in RLIN; those covered had
ISSN's (but there were some with ISSN's that were NOT in RLIN).  Also, RLIN's
Notes field provides access information (access method, path and filenames).
 
>* I am not sure about *reviews* of e-serials, but certainly the ARL
>Directory along with it's updating service "New electronic journals
>and newsletters" does provide a cetralised listing of title.
 
Agreed - ARL is the most complete source of info on e-journals published on
the Internet. I was surprised, however, to find that it is not 100% failproof.
With sci/tech journals, several titles did escape the notice of ARL's
'New-Journals' list; I am not sure why.  Some I learned about by following
subject-oriented discussion lists, where announcements of new e-journals
in development or press may appear. And some were found with dumb luck --
by prospecting around subject-oriented sites on the 'Net.  That fact left
me feeling a bit uneasy, wondering how many I'd missed!
 
One thing that is for certain about science journals published on the Internet -
- they are in an early evolutionary stage, and we are seeing just the beginning.
Since submitting a first draft to the editors in early Spring, and viewing
the galleys in early Summer, I had to add several new titles to the survey!
 
 
Gail Clement                                    (305) 348-3417
Science/Information Services Librarian          clementg@servax.fiu.edu
Florida International University
Miami, FL  33199
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 14 Sep 1994 08:11:23 EDT
Reply-To:     Ann Okerson 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Re: indexing of e-serials
 
 
 
Gail Clement wrote:
 
> Yes, indexing is spotty at best.  Large commercial e-journals, such as Online
> Journal of Current Clinical Trials, are being picked by up scientific indexing
> services, but many of the 'non-profit' journals, most of which have
> ISSN's,  are not.
 
        Certainly spotty, but improving.  No brand new paper journal,
        however prestigious-sounding, is going to be picked up by the
        major indexing and abstracting services in its field from
        the first issue on.  The journals must show performance and
        quality over time.  If we remember that the "oldest" and
        "traditional" e-journals started to appear in 1990, and
        that's only four years ago for the most long-lived, it comes
        as no surprise that those are starting to be indexed in the
        conventional sources now, and the later ones are now candidates
        for such I & A services also.  While this may not seem perfect,
        it's not an unreasonable time frame either.
 
And on another thread:
 
> Agreed - ARL is the most complete source of info on e-journals published on
> the Internet. I was surprised, however, to find that it is not 100% failproof.
> With sci/tech journals, several titles did escape the notice of ARL's
> 'New-Journals' list; I am not sure why.  Some I learned about by following
> subject-oriented discussion lists, where announcements of new e-journals
> in development or press may appear. And some were found with dumb luck --
> by prospecting around subject-oriented sites on the 'Net.  That fact left
> me feeling a bit uneasy, wondering how many I'd missed!
 
        You bet we're not 100% failproof!  While we have a cybersurfing
        research assistant who hunts for things in various major sites,
        and have a number of reporting sources we check and a few
        colleague-cybersurfers who are terrific about sending in entries,
        we could sure use more reporters and informants.  The "why" is
        that there is so much going on in so many places on the
        Internet, that it takes a wide web of partnering colleagues
        to make the resource the best it can be.  (Dumb luck is
        certainly another major source of such information!)
 
        So Beth King, Dru Mogge, and I ask you all, including the
        poster of the above message, to remember to send us the things
        you locate on the net so we can share them with everyone.
        Our appetite is whetted by the mention of the science journals
        above, Gail.
 
        Thanks to those of you who have been so helpful to us over
        the past year.  NewJour-L is available with the standard
        subscribe message to listproc@e-math.ams.org
 
 
        Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
        ann@cni.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 14 Sep 1994 08:12:22 EDT
Reply-To:     deitz@richmond.infi.net
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         deitz@richmond.infi.net
Organization: Your Organization
Subject:      How do I find a Listserv?
 
 
I have a newsletter about radio.....how do I find a Listserv so I can turn it
into a digest?
Any suggestions most appreciated
 
Corey Deitz, Q94, Richmond
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Sep 1994 12:57:54 EDT
Reply-To:     John Wilcox 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         John Wilcox 
Subject:      Re: How do I find a Listserv?
In-Reply-To:  <9409141212.AB12829@syntax.com>
 
 
> From:deitz@richmond.infi.net
> Subject: How do I find a Listserv?
>
> I have a newsletter about radio.....how do I find a Listserv so I can turn it
> into a digest?
> Any suggestions most appreciated
>
> Corey Deitz, Q94, Richmond
 
My list of list servers has the following entries containing "radio":
 
DJ-L             DJ-L@NDSUVM1.BITNET
                 DJ-L Campus Radio Disk Jockey Discussion List
 
GTRADIO          GTRADIO@GITVM1.BITNET
                 GTRADIO - GA Tech Radio Club Mailing List
 
HAMS-PL          HAMS-PL@PLEARN.BITNET
                 DISCUSSION LIST OF POLISH RADIO AMATEURS HAMS-PL
 
NPANNEWS         NPANNEWS@WSUVM1.BITNET
                 Public Radio News Directors of the Northwest
 
PRIE-L           PRIE-L@UCSFVM.BITNET
                 Packet Radio Internet Extension List.
 
PUBRADIO         PUBRADIO@IDBSU.BITNET
                 PUBRADIO - PUBLIC RADIO DISCUSSION GROUP
 
RADIO-L          RADIO-L@UMINN1.BITNET
                 Discussion of Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB)
 
UKARC            UKARC@UKCC.BITNET
                 University of Kentucky Amateur Radio Club
 
W5AC             W5AC@TAMVM1.TAMU.EDU
                 TAMU Amateur Radio Club
 
John
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Sep 1994 12:58:10 EDT
Reply-To:     "Charles Bailey, University of Houston" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Charles Bailey, University of Houston" 
Subject:      Re: Indexing of E-Serials
 
Perhaps we shouldn't wait for A&I services to solve this problem.  An
Internet-accessible citation database for all scholarly e-journals
would be a step in the right direction.  A full-text database of the
same would be another option.  Cooperative action by e-journal publishers
and libraries may be the way to go.
 
On a related thread of the discussion . . .
 
Hats off to Ann Okerson and her associates at ARL for their ongoing work on
the Directory of Electronic Journals, Newsletters and Discussion Lists.
In my view, this is the best source of information about e-journals and
a very useful tool.
 
Best Regards,
Charles
 
+------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles W. Bailey, Jr.             Voice: (713) 743-9804   |
| Assistant Director For Systems     Fax:   (713) 743-9811   |
| University Libraries               lib3@uhupvm1.uh.edu     |
| University of Houston                                      |
| Houston, TX 77204-2091                                     |
|------------------------------------------------------------|
| Co-Editor, Advances in Library Automation and Networking   |
| Editor-in-Chief, The Public-Access Computer Systems Review |
+------------------------------------------------------------+
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Sep 1994 08:41:43 EDT
Reply-To:     Margaret E Sokolik 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      Refereed journals--submission rates
In-Reply-To:  <199409151659.JAA05524@uclink.berkeley.edu>
 
James Powell ... Library Automation, University Libraries, VPI&SU
1-4986       ... JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
             ... jpowell@borg.lib.vt.edu - NeXTMail welcome here
             ... Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
Archives: http://borg.lib.vt.edu:80/   gopher://oldborg.lib.vt.edu:70/
          file://borg.lib.vt.edu/~ftp
 
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
I would like to hear any effective strategies for improving submission
rates to refereed electronic journals.  We have a good subscribership,
we're read widely via gopher and ftp, but submission rates are lousy. We
have a distinguished editorial board, etc., but we just aren't drumming
up the articles.  Our standards are high, and we do reject submissions,
but I cringe every time I have to, knowing that there may not be another
better one to take its place.
 
Ours is a journal in English as a Second or Foreign language--it's a huge
field, so it's not like there is a shortage of researchers and writers.
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Sep 1994 08:43:14 EDT
Reply-To:     Margaret E Sokolik 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      Refereed journals--submission rates
In-Reply-To:  <199409151659.JAA05524@uclink.berkeley.edu>
 
I would like to hear any effective strategies for improving submission
rates to refereed electronic journals.  We have a good subscribership,
we're read widely via gopher and ftp, but submission rates are lousy. We
have a distinguished editorial board, etc., but we just aren't drumming
up the articles.  Our standards are high, and we do reject submissions,
but I cringe every time I have to, knowing that there may not be another
better one to take its place.
 
Ours is a journal in English as a Second or Foreign language--it's a huge
field, so it's not like there is a shortage of researchers and writers.
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Sep 1994 12:41:57 EDT
Reply-To:     weibel@oclc.org
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         weibel@oclc.org
Subject:      Seminar Announcement
 
                         OCLC Distinguished Seminar Series
 
 
                  THE EXHILARATION OF MAKING ACCESSIBLE DOCUMENTS:
                          PUBLISHING FOR THE PRINT-DISABLED
 
 
                                    Yuri Rubinsky
                              President and Co-Founder
                                   SoftQuad, Inc.
 
 
                                  October 11, 1994
                            8:30 a.m.  Coffee and donuts
                            9:00-11:00 a.m.  Presentation
                                     Auditorium
 
 
New methods of text markup allow us to create document databases which
can simultaneously be delivered in a variety of forms. One of the most
significant advances is in preparing documents for print publication or
standard on-line access and making them instantly available in Braille,
large print editions and synthetic computer voice for the
print-disabled.  Since December, 1991, Yuri Rubinsky has served on the
International Committee for Accessible Document Design (ICADD), which
is developing strategies and techniques for the use of SGML to generate
Braille, large print and voice-synthesized texts.  Mr. Rubinsky's talk
will focus on the importance of structuring electronic documents such
that they can serve the visually handicapped, and the necessary
adaptations in current technology that are necessary to support this
goal.
 
 
    *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *
 
Yuri Rubinsky is president and co-founder of SoftQuad Inc., a leader in
the creation of software for the Standard Generalized Markup Language
(SGML). He was a 1989 winner of the Graphic Communications
Association's award for meritorious achievement in the technical
documentation industry and has chaired the GCA's annual four-day SGML
conference since 1988.  He edited Charles F. Goldfarb's The SGML
Handbook, the 700-page authoritative reference work on the standard,
published by Oxford University Press, and co-wrote and produced SGML:
The Movie, an 18-minute introductory videotape. He is also co-author of
the "politically incorrect book of the decade", published in January,
1993, by The Porcupine's Quill, an award-winning Canadian literary
press: Christopher Columbus Answers All Charges, a novel, the first
book to have appeared in Braille and computer voice editions before the
trade paperback.
 
He served on the NATO Industry Advisory Group's CALS (Computer-Aided
Acquisition and Logistics Support) Study technical standards team, in
the area of standards for publishing, and is a member of the CALS
Industry Steering Group Standards Working Group and Electronic
Publishing Committee.  He is also a member of the ISO/IEC working group
in Canada that created SGML and related standards.  He is a member of
the Internet Engineering Task Force working group which is developing
and maintaining HTML, the markup language of the World Wide Web, and is
a member of the organizing committee for upcoming World Wide Web
Conferences in North America and Europe.
 
 
   *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
 
If this seminar is of interest to you and you wish to attend, please
call (614) 764-6487 or send e-mail to bhawk@oclc.org by October 7,
1994, to reserve a seat.
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Sep 1994 12:42:40 EDT
Reply-To:     "Paolo Tosolini, Italy" 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         "Paolo Tosolini, Italy" 
Subject:      ANNOUNCE: MM-WWW-PC specs
 
MultiMedia World Wide Web PC  -  31/08/94
-----------------------------------------
 
Introduction
------------
 
Mosaic is becoming a common tool to retrieve information on Internet
through the World Wide Web. The growing possibilities offered by the
network make feasible projects such as distance education and business
presentation.
 
In this context has been created MM-WWW-PC (MultiMedia World Wide Web
Personal Computer), a series of Mosaic and WWW configuration settings
with relative software, that can be of help to Asymetrix Toolbook
developers in writing applications that can easily interact with
Mosaic for Windows.
 
A MM-WWW-PC compliant Toolbook software can be downloaded and launched
with a single mouse click by the remote user, redefining the role of
WWW to a distributor of external applications.
 
How to get it
-------------
 
MM-WWW-PC is freeware and can be downloaded directly from Internet.
To retrieve all the necessary information about it, the following
WWW address has been made available:
 
http://www.univ.trieste.it/mmwwwpc/mmwwwpc.html
 
The author
----------
 
Paolo Tosolini
University of Trieste
Via Bembo, 5 - 34015 Muggia (TS) - Italy
tel. +39-40-275030 - fax. +39-40-311850
email: tosolini@psicosun.univ.trieste.it
http://www.univ.trieste.it/tosolini.html
=========================================================================
Date:         Sat, 17 Sep 1994 09:31:31 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Network Services Conference, London, November, NSC'94 (710 lines)
 
Date:         Wed, 14 Sep 1994 22:28:24 IST
From: David Sitman 
Subject:      NSC'94 - Conference Announcement
 
  Announcement / Preliminary Program / Registration Form
 
  The Network Services Conference 1994 NSC'94
  Great Western Royal Hotel
  London, England, 28-30 November 1994
 
Open computer networking is no longer the sole domain of universities
and research institutions. Today, governments, schools, public
organizations, commercial enterprises and private individuals are
actively using and supplying information over the global Internet.
 
How will these various network communities cooperate and interact? How
will the academic and research community adapt to the new network
reality? How will the network and networking tools now available stand
up to the explosion in number of users and amount of information
available? How will we train novices? What will we pay for and what will
be for free as the commercialization of the network progresses? Will we
be inundated by advertising over the net? These are only a few of the
questions facing network service providers and users alike.
 
Building on the success of the previous Network Services Conferences in
Pisa (1992) and Warsaw (1993), NSC'94 will focus on the issue of
providing services to customers, paying special attention to the
exciting developments in global tools and services. We will address the
impact of the new global tools on service development and support, the
changing function of traditional tools and services (such as archives),
new services (such as multi-media communications), the future role of
the library and the effects of commercialization on networks and network
services. Customer support at all levels, and the role of support in
accessing global services, will also be covered.
 
Talks, tutorials,  demonstrations and  other conference  activities will
address the needs of  the research, academic, educational, government,
industrial, and commercial network communities.
 
NSC'94 is being organized by the EARN (European Academic and Research
Network) Association in cooperation with the Internet Society, RARE,
RIPE, NORDUnet and EUnet.
 
Sessions and Presentations
Note: exact titles and speakers to be confirmed
 
Monday, November 28
 
9:00-10:30    Plenary Session
 
 Keynote Talk  Steve Cisler, Apple
 
11:00-12:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A1  - Delivering Information over the Net
 
               George Brett          Overview of Information Delivery
                                     Projects and Tools
 
               Alan Emtage           Identifying Resources in the Global
                                     Information Infrastructure
 
 Session B1  - Quality of Network Services
 
               Miriam Farber         The Quality of Information on the
                                     Internet
 
               Manfred A. Bogen      Handling of QoS Characteristics
               Hans-Ludwig Hausen
               Rainer Worst
 
12:30         Lunch
 
14:00-15:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A2  - Scholarly Electronic Publishing
 
               Stevan Harnad         Universal FTP archives for esoteric
                                     science and scholarship: a subversive
                                     proposal
 
               Hermann Maurer        J.UCS - The Next Generation in
               Klaus Schmaranz       Electronic Journal Publishing
 
 Session B2  - Multimedia Communications I
 
               Anne M. Mumford       Supporting Multimedia Across
                                     the Network in UK Higher Education
 
26   3,6b      Davide Caramella      Multimedia Communication in Radiology:
               Enzo Dalle Mese       the experience of the Tuscany MAN
               Massimo Del Sarto
               Stefano Giordano
               Franco Russo
 
16:00-17:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A3  - Information Services in the former Soviet bloc
 
               Alexei P. Platonov    RELARN Project: the Support of
                                     Telecommunications for Research &
                                     Education in Russia
 
               Magdalena Smolenova   The reasons and goals of using
                                     Directory Services at the Slovak
                                     Academic Network
 
 Session B3  - Network Services for Special Interest Communities
 
               Reinhard Doelz        Mastering the Challenge:
                                     Network Resources in Biology
 
               Joachim Luegger       New Perspectives of a Distributed
                                     Electronic Information System for
                                     Mathematics
 
18:00    Panel discussions, Birds of a Feather Sessions (BOFs)
 
           Panel discussions are planned on law and ethics in electronic
           publishing and building the networking infrastucture in the
           former Soviet bloc.
 
           Birds of a Feather sessions may be convened at the request of
           any delegate to discuss a specific product, problem or
           concern. Other delegates, either with the same concern or who
           can provide a solution are invited to sign up for attendance.
 
Tuesday, November 29
 
9:00-10:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A4  - The Past and Future of Networking
 
               Klaus Birkenbihl      With Bureaucrats and Freaks
 
               Ake Gronlund          Public computer systems: a challenge
                                     for organizational learning
 
 Session B4  - Multimedia Communications II
 
               Pierre Ageron         Images Data-Base Management System
               Patrick Desfarges     on Local Network and on Internet
               Francois Besson
 
               Carlo Gaibisso        Multimedia Conferencing on Packet
               Giorgio Gambosi       Switched Networks: Testing and
               Maurizio Lancia       Evaluation
               Maurizio Vitale
 
11:00-12:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A5  - Commercial Network Services
 
               David Chaum           Effective rules in cyberspace: what
                                     we may wish to do and what we can do
 
               Alan Emtage           Publishers on the Net
 
 Session B5  - Beyond E-mail
 
               Susan Thomas          A Model for Thinking about
                                     E-mail Systems
 
               Serge Desaranno       Coordinating group communication
               Ferdi Put
 
               Dimitri Dimitroyannis Virtual Classroom: A case Study
 
12:30         Lunch
 
14:00-15:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A6  - Libraries and Networking
 
               Andrew Colleran       Aims Objectives and Practical
                                     Aspects of Project LIRN
 
               Christopher Doutney   IBSS Online
 
               Terry Morrow          Supporting a Networked Bibliographic
                                     Data Service - Hits and (a few) Misses
 
 Session B6  - Network Information Technology
 
               Louis Perrochon       Translation Servers: Gateways Between
                                     Stateless and State-Oriented
                                     Information Systems
 
               Tomaz Klobucar        An Application for User Support
               Denis Trcek           in Using Global Security Services
               Borka Jerman-Blazic
               Franc Bracun
 
16:00-17:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A7  - Networking non-HighTech Communities
 
               Miklos Pasztor        Delivering information for
               Istvan Tetenyi        the "poor"
 
               Anthea Tillyer        International Teacher Training
                                     by LISTSERV
 
               Christian de          Local Community Networks and
               Larrinaga             Development Programmes - the key to
                                     sustainable development in the 21st
                                     century
 
 Session B7  - Scholarly Electronic Publishing II
 
               Mary Keeler           A New Approach to Digital Resource
               Christian Kloesel     Development (A New Method for
               Susan Lewis           Marketing Digital Technology)
               Toby Paff
               Robert Rosenberg
 
               Rich Giordano         The Text Encoding Initiative -
                                     Using the TEI Header
 
19:30  Banquet - Royal Cafe
 
Wednesday, November 30
 
9:00-10:30   Parallel Sessions
 
 Session A8  - Networking in Schools
 
               Janet Ward Schofield  The Internet in School: Lessons
               Gail Clark Futoran    Learned from the First Year of a
               Rebecca Eurich-Fulcer National Testbed
 
               Oleg Smertin          The Past, Present and Future of
               Rimas Janusauskas     Lithuanian Networking for Schools
 
 Session B8  - Navigating the Web
 
               Tom Baker             What's a Web without pages?
               Inke Bruening
               Lothar Klein
               Michael Lenz
 
               Jon Crowcroft         Touring and Navigating a Global
                                     Learning Environment
 
11:00-12:30   Plenary Session
 
 Keynote Talk  George Brett, CNIDR
 
12:30         Closing Cocktail
 
Conference Venue
 
We invite you to browse the information on London available
from the EARN World-Wide Web server at:
 
     http://www.earn.net/nsc94/venue.html
 
(and if you don't know about the World-Wide Web, then you MUST attend
this conference!).
 
The conference will be held at the Great Western Royal Hotel, near the
Paddington railway station. The Great Western is one of the best 3 star
conference venues in London, and very easy to get to, as it is situated
on 4 underground lines, a railway station and is on a main road into
central London.
 
     Great Western Royal Hotel
     Praed Street
     Paddington
     London W2 1HE
     UK
     Phone: +44 71 723 8064
     Fax:   +44 71 723 1739
 
Organizing Secretariat
     NSC'94 Conference Secretariat
     Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
     Chilton
     Didcot
     OX11 0QX
     UK
     Phone: +44 235 44 6750
     Fax:   +44 235 44 6665
     Internet:    nsc94@rl.ac.uk
     EARN/BITNET: nsc94@ukacrl.bitnet
 
Posters, Connectivity and Demonstrations
 
Poster boards will be available to participants for the display of their
posters and projects. Proposals for posters should be sent to:
NSC94@EARNCC.EARN.NET (or NSC94@EARNCC.BITNET).
 
A terminal room with connectivity to the Internet will be available to
delegates.
 
Space will be available for workstations and PCs to be used for
demonstrations. An Ethernet connected to the Internet will be available
in this room. People interested in setting up demonstrations may send
their proposals to NSC94@EARNCC.EARN.NET (or NSC94@EARNCC.BITNET) by
16 September 1994.
 
Registration
 
Please complete the enclosed registration/accommodation form and return
it by electronic mail to the address given in the form. You can also
register by fax or ordinary mail using the information in the form.
 
Note that forms will be processed when the required payment is received.
 
The conference fee covers entry to all conference sessions and
demonstrations, conference material, coffee breaks, lunches and
the banquet (fees are listed in pounds sterling):
 
          EARLY Registration by 10 October    UKL 220 (ca. ECU 275)
          LATE  Registration by 10 November   UKL 250 (ca. ECU 312)
          DESK  Registration                  UKL 280 (ca. ECU 350)
 
To qualify for the early registration rate, your form and payment for
registration must be sent to the Organizing Secretariat by 10 October
1994. The late registration rate applies to all payments sent after
October 10 and before November 10, 1994.
 
Registration will take place in the Great Western Royal Hotel at the
conference office on Sunday, 27 November 1994, from 17:00 to 21:00
and throughout the whole conference.
 
All payments must be in pounds sterling. For the cheques and the bank
transfers, please ensure that your payment is made net of all bank
charges.
 
The preferred way of paying is by credit card (VISA, MASTERCARD,
EUROCARD).
 
International cheques or bankers drafts must be payable to:
     EPSRC, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX, UK.
 
Please state on the cheque "NSC'94" and the name(s) of the
participant(s).
 
Payments can be made by bank transfer to:
 
    Lloyds Bank Didcot, Sort Code 30-93-93, Account number 0143698.
 
Please state "NSC'94" and the name(s) of the participant(s).
 
Cancellation and Refunds
 
Payments made for registration will be refunded, minus 30%, if
cancellation reaches the Organizing Secretariat with a postal date of
no later than 14 November 1994.
 
Accommodation
 
Hotel rooms have already been reserved for the conference participants.
Please fill in the hotel reservation section of the form and return it
to the Organizing Secretariat. Early reservation is recommended to
obtain a room in the hotel preferred.
 
Hotel costs will be paid on departure from the hotel. Final bills may be
settled by credit card.
 
The daily room charges in pounds sterling are as follows:
 
     Hotel                      Single          Double
                                 UKL.            UKL.
 
     Great Western Royal ***      70              90
     Pavillion                    48              60
     Henry VIII                   48              60
     Blakemore                    36              48
 
 
Prices indicated include breakfast, services and tax. All bedrooms have
private bath or shower, and WC.
 
All the hotels are within 10 minutes walking distance of the conference
hotel.
 
*** The Great Western Royal Hotel is the conference site.
 
Lunch will be served in the Great Western Royal on Monday and Tuesday.
Lunch tickets will be distributed with the conference materials.
Extra tickets may be purchased on-site.
 
The menus will be arranged to cover most dietary needs. Indicate any
special dietary needs on the registration form.
 
The banquet will be held on the evening of 29 November at the Cafe
Royal. The price for the banquet is included in the delegate
registration fee. Tickets for accompanying persons may be purchased
(see the registration/accommodation form). The price for one ticket is
UKL 45.
 
The Cafe Royal is 100 metres from the Piccadilly Underground station in
Regent Street. The Piccadilly station is on the Bakerloo Line which also
passes through Paddington. From all the hotels travel from Paddington is
recommended.
 
Tutorial
 
There will be a hands-on tutorial session on using the World Wide Web
at the end of the conference, on Wednesday, 30 November 1994, from
14:00 to 18:00. The session will provide hands-on experience in
accessing the Web using popular clients such as NCSA Mosaic. Participants
will have the opportunity to explore some of the multimedia resources
available on the Web and to use searching tools to discover new
resources.  Participants will also have the opportunity to create
material on the World Wide Web.
 
The number of participants is limited.
 
The tutorial fee covers participation in the tutorial, printed
materials and a coffee break. The tutorial fee is:
 
          EARLY Tutorial fee by 10 October    UKL 40 (ca. ECU 50)
          LATE  Tutorial fee by 10 November   UKL 45 (ca. ECU 56)
          DESK  Tutorial fee                  UKL 50 (ca. ECU 63)
 
 
EARN and RARE Technical Meetings
 
The following EARN and RARE meetings will be held in conjunction with
the Conference. Meeting rooms will be located in the Great Western
Royal.
 
- Convened by EARN:
 
  Note that these meetings are by invitation only.
 
     Performance Evaluation Group (EARN-PEG):
          Wednesday, November 23   14:00 - 18:00
 
     Routing Project Group (EARN-RPG):
          Thursday, November 24     9:00 - 18:00
 
     Network Operations Group (EARN-NOG):
          Friday, November 25       9:00 - 18:00
 
     Executive Committee:
          Sunday, November 27      14:00 - 18:00
 
     Board of Directors:
          Wednesday, November 30    14:00 - 18:00
          Thursday, December 1       9:00 - 16:00
 
- Convened by RARE:
 
  Note that these technical working groups are open to anyone willing to
  participate.
 
     4th Framework & Telematics for Research (UPTURN)
          Wednesday, November 30   14:00 - 18:00
 
     Lower Layer Technology (LLT)
          Thursday, December 1      9:00 - 13:00
 
     Network Operations (NOP)
          Thursday, December 1      9:00 - 13:00
 
     Information Services and User Support (ISUS)
          Thursday, December 1      9:00 - 18:00
          Friday, December 2        9:00 - 18:00
 
- Convened by EARN & RARE:
 
  Note that this meeting is open.
 
     EARN Information Services (EARNINFO) &
     RARE Information Services and User Support (WG-ISUS):
 
          Thursday, December 1      9:00 - 18:00
 
How to reach the hotels
 
>From Heathrow airport:
 
There is a bus, The Heathrow Link, which stops outside the conference
hotel. The cost is UKL 5. Approximately one hour travel time.
 
By Underground, take the Piccadilly line to Gloucester Road and change to
the Circle line which is on a different platform. The cost is UKL 3.
Approximately 45 minutes travel time.
 
By taxi the cost is UKL 35. Approximately 45 minutes travel time.
 
>From Gatwick airport:
 
There is a train from Gatwick to Victoria Station which takes 30 minutes.
The cost is UKL 7.50 or UKL 8.50 by express. From Victoria Station
take the Underground Circle line.
 
There is very little car parking at the hotels and spaces should be
reserved in advance with the hotels.
 
Further Information and General Inquiry
 
Further information will be available through the conference mailing
list, NSC94-L@EARNCC.EARN.NET (or NSC94-L@EARNCC.BITNET). If you want to
make sure you receive the preliminary program and other information of
interest to conference participants, join the list by sending e-mail to:
 
     LISTSERV@EARNCC.EARN.NET  (or LISTSERV@EARNCC.BITNET)
 
with the line:
 
     SUB NSC94-L Your Name
 
Conference information is also available from the EARN anonymous FTP
server (ftp.earn.net), Gopher server (gopher.earn.net), and WWW server
(http://www.earn.net/nsc94/nsc94.html).
 
If you have any questions or require any assistance, you can contact the
conference organizers at:
 
     NSC'94
     EARN Office
     PSI - Batiment 211
     91405 Orsay CEDEX
     FRANCE
     Tel: +33 1 6941 2426
     Fax: +33 1 6941 6683
     Internet:    nsc94@earncc.earn.net
     EARN/BITNET: nsc94@earncc.bitnet
 
 
The Network Services Conference 1994 is being organized by the EARN
(European Academic and Research Network) Association in cooperation with
the following organizations:
 
     Internet Society
     RARE
     RIPE
     NORDUnet
     EUnet
 
Program Committee
 
George Brett, USA (Chair); David Sitman, Israel (Vice-Chair); Rob
Blokzijl, The Netherlands; Manfred Bogen, Germany; Paul Bryant, United
Kingdom; Nadine Grange, France; Glenn Kowack, The Netherlands; Joyce K.
Reynolds, USA; Jean Ritchie, United Kingdom; Eric Thomas, Sweden.
 
Organizing Committee
 
Paul Bryant, United Kingdom (Chair); Daniele Bovio, France; Nadine
Grange, France; Frode Greisen, Denmark; David Sitman, Israel.
 
------------------ REGISTRATION/ACCOMMODATION FORM -----------------------------
 
 
                               NSC'94
 
                 The Network Services Conference 1994
              London, United Kingdom, 28-30 November 1994
 
 
 
Please complete this form in block capitals and return it with your
payment to:
 
     NSC'94 Conference Secretariat
     Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
     Chilton
     Didcot
     OX11 0QX
     UK
 
Forms may be returned by fax to:
     +44 235 44 6665
 
or by electronic mail to:
     Internet:    nsc94@rl.ac.uk
     EARN/BITNET: NSC94@UKACRL.BITNET
 
Telephone enquiries:
     +44 235 44 6750
 
DELEGATE
 
Family name ............................. First name ....................
Mr/Mrs/Ms/Dr/Prof
 
Organisation/Company:
 
...........................................................
 
 
 
Mailing address:
 
...........................................................
 
 
 
...........................................................
 
 
 
...........................................................
 
 
 
Country ................................................
 
Telephone ..............................................
 
Facsimile (or Telex) ...................................
 
E-mail .................................................
 
HOTEL RESERVATION
 
Hotel costs will be paid on departure from the hotel.
 
     Hotel                        Single          Double
                                  UKL per night   UKL per night
     Great Western Royal          70              90
     Pavillion                    48              60
     Henry VIII                   48              60
     Blakemore                    36              48
 
All the hotels are within 10 minutes walking distance of the conference
hotel.
 
HOTEL PREFERRED:
 
Please state preferred hotel: ..............................
Second preference           : ..............................
Room (please mark one):      O single   O double
 
Arrival date: .......... Departure date: ......... No. of nights ...........
 
If possible I would like to stay at the same hotel as
..................................................
 
 
O Please note that I am arranging my own accommodation. My conference
  address will be: .....................................
 
O Please state any dietary requirements..................
 
I will  join the following  EARN or  RARE meetings, held  in conjunction
with the Conference:
 
Convened by EARN:
 
 
  O  EARN-PEG on 23 November afternoon
  O  EARN-RPG on 24 November
  O  EARN-NOG on 25 November
  O  EARN-EXEC on 27 November afternoon
  O  EARN-BoD on 30 November afternoon and 1 December morning
  O  EARN-INFO on 1 December (joint session with RARE WG-ISUS)
 
Convened by RARE:
 
  O  UPTURN on 30 November afternoon
  O  WG-NOP on 1 December morning
  O  WG-LLT on 1 December Morning
  O  WG-ISUS on 1 and 2 December
 
 
------------------------------ PAYMENTS ----------------------------------------
 
 
1. REGISTRATION
 
ONE Registration fee                                   UKL .............
    Early - by 10 October:  UKL 220
    Late  - by 10 November: UKL 250
    Desk:                   UKL 280
 
2. BANQUET
 
..... Extra tickets for banquet on 29 November          UKL .............
 
    (Delegate free; Accompanying persons: UKL 45)
 
3. TUTORIAL
 
ONE Tutorial fee                                       UKL .............
    Early - by 10 October:  UKL 40
    Late  - by 10 November: UKL 45
    Desk:                   UKL 50
 
                                                       -----------------
 
                                          T O T A L    UKL .............
 
 
O Credit card
 
  |__| VISA       |__| MASTERCARD   |__| EUROCARD
 
  I authorise payment of UKL .............to EPSRC
  Card No. .............................. expiry date ...............
  Holder's full name on card (PRINT) ....................................
  Holder's address                   ....................................
                                     ....................................
                                     ....................................
                                     ....................................
 
Date ........................          Signature .......................
                                       (Only for ordinary mail or fax)
 
 
O I enclose an international cheque or bankers draft in pounds
  Sterling for the sum of UKL ............. payable to:  EPSRC, Chilton,
  Didcot, OX11 0QX, UK. Please state on the cheque NSC'94 and the name(s)
  of the participant(s).
 
O I wish to pay by bank transfer in UKL net of bank charges.
  Please state clearly "NSC'94" and the name of the participant on the
  transfer document.  Transfers should be sent to:
    Lloyds Bank Didcot, Sort Code 30-93-93, Account number 0143698.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 19 Sep 1994 16:33:17 EDT
Reply-To:     SBURRIGH@LIBRARY.WRIGHT.EDU
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Scott Burright 
Organization: Wright State University
Subject:      E-serials respondents: Thanks
 
Thanks to all those who responded to my query about indexing of
e-sources.  Apparently, this is a rapidly evolving field, as the lead from
this Friday's (9/16) OCLC press release indicates:
 
>****************************************************************************
>FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
>                                                 Erik Jul (614) 764-4364
>                                                 erik_jul@oclc.org
>                                                 Nita Dean (614) 761-5002
>                                                 nita_dean@oclc.org
>
>                  U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROVIDES GRANT
>                       FOR CATALOG OF INTERNET RESOURCES
>
>    DUBLIN, Ohio, Sept. 16, 1994--The U.S. Department of Education
>has awarded a $62,000 College Library Technology and Cooperation
>grant to support the OCLC project, "Building a Catalog of Internet
>Resources."
>
>    The project initiates a nationwide, coordinated effort among
>libraries and institutions of higher education to create, implement, test
>and evaluate a searchable database of USMARC format bibliographic
>records, complete with electronic location and access information, for
>Internet-accessible materials.
 
This is particularly interesting:
 
>...OCLC will test the technical feasibility of providing direct user
>access to remote materials based on encoded location and access
>information.
 
The time frame on this project is 18 months, and OCLC will fund about
$45k of it.  Until it (or something like it) is done, I feel the term "Internet
access" will have to be used loosely.
 
Scott Burright
Networked Info Resources Librarian
Wright State University
Dayton, OH 45435
sburrigh@library.wright.edu
 
"I claim sole responsibility for the content of this
 message. Opinions expressed herein are not necessarily
 those of any institution or professional body."
 
     **** REMEMBER: Never send cash by e-mail! ****
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 21 Sep 1994 09:18:02 EDT
Reply-To:     David Stern 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         David Stern 
Subject:      citation standards for e-journals
 
 
Does anyone know of an acceptable set of standards for citations to
electronic journals (and/or electronic  preprints, documents, etc)?
 
 
***************************************************************
 
  David Stern
  Director of Science Libraries and Information Services
  Kline Science Library
  Yale University
  219 Prospect Street
  P.O. Box 208111
  New Haven, CT  06520-8111
 
  phone:  203 432-3447
  fax: 203 432-3441
 
  email:  dstern@minerva.cis.yale.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Sep 1994 08:47:57 EDT
Reply-To:     Peter Graham 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Peter Graham 
Subject:      Re: citation standards for e-journals
In-Reply-To:  Your message of Wed, 21 Sep 1994 09:18:02 EDT
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University Libraries
 
>Does anyone know of an acceptable set of standards for citations to
electronic journals (and/or electronic  preprints, documents, etc)? <
 
1.  Use the URL where possible, e.g.
URL:ftp://xxx.nodename.nz/pub/dirname/filename
 
2.  Use the information given in Crane and Li, but use it with caution.
Nancy Crane and Xia Li, eds, *Electronic Style* (Meckler, 1993).  See my
review in *Internet Research* (Spring, 1994), also at:
URL:http://aultnis.rutgers.edu/pgrutgers.html
 --pg
 
Peter Graham    psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu    Rutgers University Libraries
169 College Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08903   (908)445-5908; fax (908)445-5888
WWW URL:http://aultnis.rutgers.edu/pghome.html   PHONES CHANGED 7/1 932>445;
from (908)932-xxxx to (908) 445-xxxx (not all of Rutgers changed)...8/20/94.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Sep 1994 08:49:53 EDT
Reply-To:     Frank Harris 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:      W: Incorrect or incomplete address field found and
              ignored.
From:         Frank Harris 
Subject:      A Peer-reviewed journal goes electronic
 
Hi.  I'm Frank Harris of the Optical Society of America.
 
OSA's newest peer-reviewed publication, "Engineering and Laboratory Notes,"
is now available on line.  At present "Engineering and Laboratory Notes"
comes out quarterly as an insert in OSA's news magazine, Optyics and
Photonics News.  It is being co-published quarterly on the WWW as part of
OSA's home page, "OSA OpticsNet."  For archival purposes such as citation,
each year's collected articles are republished in the journal Applied Optics.
 
The online version of"Engineering and Laboratory Notes" is converted to HTML
from the typesetters files.  At present, equations are scanned and pasted
into the text as graphics (and some of the articles have a lot of math).  The
August issue, the first to go on line, does not include the figures, but I
plan to add them retroactively when the next issue goes on line in November.
 
The URL for "Engineering and Laboratory Notes" (actually OSA OpticsNet) is
 
     http://www.osa.org
or
     http://192.239.36.3
 
I just thought I'd let you know what we have been up to at OSA.
 
Sincerely,
 
Frank E. Harris                      fharri@osa.org
Optical Society of America           fharris@aip.org
2010 Massachusetts AVE NW            Phone - 202-416-1904
Washington, DC 20036-1023            http://192.239.36.3
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Sep 1994 08:50:07 EDT
Reply-To:     Frank Harris 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
Comments:      W: Incorrect or incomplete address field found and
              ignored.
From:         Frank Harris 
Subject:      Submission guidelines for "Engineering and Laboratory Notes"
 
"Engineering and Laboratory Notes," is available online at
 
   http://www.osa.org
or
   http://192.239.36.3
 
on OSA's WWW server.
****************************************************************
 
 
                    ***  Announcement  ***
 
 
               Engineering and Laboratory Notes
 
 
The Optical Society's newest publication for the optical engineer and applied
optical scientist.
 
This quarterly insert in Optics & Photonics News  enables those working in
applied optics to communicate interesting and important concepts in succinct
form. Engineering & Laboratory Notes  includes invited and contributed
articles on subjects including, but not limited to:
 
% descriptions of optical designs;
% new data on properties of optical materials;
% measurement techniques;
% methods for mounting optical elements;
% interesting lab set-ups;
% laboratory practices;
% techniques for engineering optical instruments; and
% timely reviews describing direct applications of existing technology.
 
 
 
"Notes"  differs from the usual archival publications in that the material is
meant to be of practical value to optical engineers and scientists in
carrying out their work.
 
Authors have the benefit of wide distribution through the World Wide Web on
OSA OpticsNet , on paper in Optics & Photonics News , as well as archival
publication in a year-end supplement to Applied Optics , which will provide a
permanent reference for the material. All papers are reviewed by a Board of
Editors or reviewer selected for their experience in the field. Robert R.
Shannon serves as "Notes" editor.
 
Submission Guidelines
Manuscripts are limited to two published pages (about 1600 words, less 175
words per figure); longer papers will be considered, but shortening may be
required. All papers should include a brief abstract and references; figures
must be camera-ready and photographs must be black and white. Initially,
there will be no page charges for publication.
 
% All papers must include a brief abstract and references.
% Manuscripts must be typed double-spaced and include a word count.
% Figures must be camera-ready and photographs must be black and white;
  captions must be included and should be typed on a separate page.
% Mail one copy only; faxed copies are not acceptable.
 
 
 
Please mail  manuscripts to:
Engineering & Laboratory Notes
c/o Manuscript Office
2010 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
 
For questions on manuscript submission and status, please call: 202/416-1916
or e-mail opn@osa.org
 
For questions on manuscripts in production, please call: 202/416-1970 or
e-mail opn@osa.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Sep 1994 08:51:23 EDT
Reply-To:     jgc 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         jgc 
Subject:      Re: citation standards for e-journals
In-Reply-To:  Your message of "Wed, 21 Sep 1994 09:18:02 EDT."
 
Dear David,
Please try the following publication:
 
Li, Xia and Nancy B. Crane, Electronic Style: A Citation Guide to Citing
Electronic Information, (Westport, Conn.: Meckler, 1993).
        -xi, 1-65.     ISBN 0-88736-909-x
 
I hope that it is what you want. Best Wishes
                                           Jeong-Yeou Chiu (JOYO)
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Sep 1994 16:59:57 EDT
Reply-To:     CLEATHEM@UMIAMI.BITNET
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Cecilia Leathem 
Subject:      Citing electronic publications
 
Anyone interested in examples of citations to online/electronic material
may wish to consult the new APA guide available electronically.  Send a message
   to LISTSERV@CMSA.BERKELEY.EDU with the command: INDEX TESLEJ-L.  In the index
listing there is a file named TESLEJ-L APAGUIDE.  For you info, TESLEJ-L is
the electronic journal of TESOL (Teaching English as a Second Language).
 
Cecilia Leathem
University of Miami
cleathem@umiami.ir.miami.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Sep 1994 08:42:36 EDT
Reply-To:     Margaret E Sokolik 
Sender:       "Publishing E-Journals : Publishing, Archiving,
              and Access" 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      Re: Citing electronic publications
In-Reply-To:  <199409232100.OAA22118@uclink.berkeley.edu>
 
On Fri, 23 Sep 1994, Cecilia Leathem wrote:
 
> Anyone interested in examples of citations to online/electronic material
> may wish to consult the new APA guide available electronically.  Send a
 message
>    to LISTSERV@CMSA.BERKELEY.EDU with the command: INDEX TESLEJ-L.  In the
 index
> listing there is a file named TESLEJ-L APAGUIDE.  For you info, TESLEJ-L is
> the electronic journal of TESOL (Teaching English as a Second Language).
>
 
Thanks to Cecilia for putting in a word for us. However, be advised that
we are not affiliated with TESOL, Inc., which is the national
organization. We are an independent publication.
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Sep 1994 13:44:46 EDT
Reply-To:     Tammy Whalen 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Tammy Whalen 
Organization: Defence Research Establishment, Ottawa, Ontario
Subject:      How to Find Journals on the Net
 
The usual apologies if this question was just asked yesterday...but can
anyone tell me of a way to locate journals on internet?  I'd just like
to know what's there, both academic and the fanzine sort.  Here's what
I thought of doing so far:  posting a message like this one in every
newsgroup (I don't like the sound of that) or using veronica to search
for the words "zine, fanzine, etc.".  Both ideas seemed pretty feeble,
so I thought I'd ask the experts.  YES, YOU!
 
Thanks!
 
Tammy
 
Operational Research and Analysis Library, Dept. of National Defence
whalen@dgs.dnd.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Sep 1994 09:12:34 EDT
Reply-To:     Ken Laws 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Ken Laws 
Subject:      Re: How to Find Journals on the Net
In-Reply-To:  <199409261745.NAA15634@ipe.cc.vt.edu>
 
 
> can anyone tell me of a way to locate journals on internet?
 
It depends partly on what you mean by journals on Internet,
but here are a couple of leads from my past newsletters.
I believe the printed ARL directory sells for about $45-$55.
 
 
    Diane Kovacs has published the 8th revision of her Directory
of Scholarly Electronic Conferences.  Send a "get ACADLIST FILE8
f=mail" message to listserv@kentvm.kent.edu for the computer
science groups.  You may also want the README or INDEX.
You may FTP file ACADLIST.FILE8 from "library" on ksuvxa.kent.edu,
or gopher to gopher.usask.ca or gopher.cni.org.  A print version
called "The Directory of Electronic Journals Newsletters and
Academic Discussion Lists" is available from Ann Okerson
(ann@cni.org).  [dkovacs@kentvm.bitnet, PACS-L, 3/9/94.]
 
  ...
 
    Ann Okerson points out that ARL figures in V4 N30 were two
years old.  There are now 75-100 refereed journals -- depending
on your definition -- up from about 36 a year ago.  Even this
tally is dated, considering the rapid growth.  See the Assoc.
of Research Libraries' "Directory of Electronic Journals,
Newsletters and Academic Discussion Lists,"  5/94, ISSN 1057-1337.
[ann@cni.org, 8/4/94.]  (The book is 575 pp., of which 470 are
descriptions and contact info for the lists.  Just the index
is 42 pp., with 15 references for AI journals and lists.)
 
 
There also exist listings of 'zines and other e-publications.
PACS-L is the list most often carrying such announcements.
If you're more interested in print magazines available
via the net, there's an Internet Newsstand.
 
                                        -- Ken Laws
 
 
Dr. Kenneth I. Laws; (415) 493-7390; laws@ai.sri.com.
Ask about my weekly AI/IS/CS online news service.
-------
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Sep 1994 09:12:49 EDT
Reply-To:     JUDITH HOPKINS AT SUNY BUFFALO 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         JUDITH HOPKINS AT SUNY BUFFALO 
Organization: University at Buffalo
Subject:      Re: How to Find Journals on the Net
 
From:   UBVMS::ULCJH        "JUDITH HOPKINS AT SUNY BUFFALO" 26-SEP-1994
 17:38:42.29
To:     IN%"whalen@dgs.dnd.ca"
CC:     ULCJH
Subj:   RE: How to Find Journals on the Net
 
    For a hardcopy list of electronic journals try the latest edition
(currently 4th) of the ARL publication "Directory of Electronic Journals,
Newsletters and Academic Discussion Lists."   (Washington, D.C. :
Association of Research Libraries, 1994).  $45.00
 
    An electronic version (and therefore more up-to-date)  of the
Electronic journals and newsletters portion of the above work are
available from the U of Ottawa.
  via email
      Send message to: LISTSERV@UOTTAWA or LISTSERV@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.EDU
       saying (note the spelling!):
           get ejournl1 directry
           get ejournl2 directry
 
   via anonymous FTP
      FTP to PANDA1.UOTTAWA.CA
      login as: anonymous
      password: [use your email address]
      cd /pub /religon/
        get electronic-serials-directory.txt
 
 
   To be alerted to the existence of new electronic journals you might
want to subscribe to: NEWJOUR-L@E-MATH.AMS.ORG    To subscribe send an
email message to: LISTSERV@E-MATH-AMS.ORG saying:
   subscribe newjour-l Yourfirstname Yourlastname
 
***************************************************************************
Judith Hopkins                                    716 - 645-2796 (phone)
Technical Services Research and Analysis Officer  716 - 645-5955 (FAX)
Lockwood Library Building
University at Buffalo                   ULCJH@UBVM    (BITNET)
Buffalo, NY  14260-2200                 ULCJH@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU (Internet)
   Listowner of AUTOCAT@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
****************************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Sep 1994 09:13:10 EDT
Reply-To:     Judith Gresham 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Judith Gresham 
Subject:      Re: Citing electronic publications
In-Reply-To:  <199409261243.IAA14189@ipe.cc.vt.edu>
 
I found the file was not available yet.
 
J. Gresham
 
On Mon, 26 Sep 1994, Margaret E
Sokolik wrote:
 
> On Fri, 23 Sep 1994, Cecilia Leathem wrote:
>
> > Anyone interested in examples of citations to online/electronic material
> > may wish to consult the new APA guide available electronically.  Send a
>  message
> >    to LISTSERV@CMSA.BERKELEY.EDU with the command: INDEX TESLEJ-L.  In the
>  index
> > listing there is a file named TESLEJ-L APAGUIDE.  For you info, TESLEJ-L is
> > the electronic journal of TESOL (Teaching English as a Second Language).
> >
>
> Thanks to Cecilia for putting in a word for us. However, be advised that
> we are not affiliated with TESOL, Inc., which is the national
> organization. We are an independent publication.
>
> = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
> Maggi Sokolik, Editor
> TESL-EJ
> msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
> = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Sep 1994 09:13:41 EDT
Reply-To:     JF Rowland 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         JF Rowland 
Subject:      Reinventing the Library
 
           Internet Capacity Problems: An Issue for E-Journals?
               Are We Going to Reinvent the Library?
 
Roy Davies of the University Library at Exeter University in England
recently sent the following message to the British librarians'
discussion list, lis-link.  Thomas Krichel, an economist from the
University of Surrey in England, took issue with Davies' view, saying
"economists are always wrong (;-)", but produced no actual evidence for a
lack of danger of net congestion.
 
>The current issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives contains
>a paper by two economists, Mackie-Mason and Varian, on Internet which
>May be of interest to many members of this list.  The first part of
>the article simply covers the historical background and gives an
>elementary explanation of the technology.  The second part is likely
>to be more controversial.  The authors are of the opinion that
>network congestion will become increasingly severe unless some system
>of charging is introduced and they discuss various schemes.  The
>reference is:
>
>MacKie-Mason, J.K. and Varian, H.  Economic FAQs about the Internet.
>Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 8, no. 3, Summer 1994,
>p.75-96.
>
>A longer, more up-to-date version of their paper is available as a
>World Wide Web document.  The URL is:
>http://gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu/FAQs/FAQs.html
>
>The same issue of the journal also contains a paper on Internet
>resources for economists:
>
>Goffe, W.L.  Computer network resources for economists.  Journal of
>Economic Perspectives, vol. 8, no. 3, Summer 1994, p. 97-119.
>
>A World Wide Web document based on a list maintained by Goffe is also
>available.  Its URL is:
>
>http://gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu/ResourcesHTML/FAQ_7_11.html
>
>Roy Davies
>University of Exeter
 
 
There is controversy on the issue of whether the Internet will have
the capacity to carry all the traffic that it will be asked to bear.
One side says that optical fibre technology is advancing so fast that
this just won't be a problem: its capacity will be virtually infinite.
The other side says that the growth of traffic is so fast that, like
the old-fashioned superhighways for cars, it will snarl up.  I don't
know the answer, not being a networking technical person; but I am a
politician in a small way, and I suspect that just as there is no such
thing as a free lunch, there is also no such thing as a free network
of infinite capacity.  Already our Australian colleagues have to pay a
per-transaction charge for use of the Internet, which is inhibiting
academic use of international resources by Australian academics and
(especially) students.  I don't suppose Australia will be the last
country to impose such a charge.
 
It seems to me that traffic growth falls into three categories:
 
(1) More of the same.   The figure of 15% growth per month has been
much quoted, and this simply consists of more and more people joining
the Net and using it for the conventional purposes like e-mail, ftp,
gopher, etc.
 
(2) More graphics (etc.).  As people move from sending ASCII text, or
downloading graphical material in non-real-time mode, to wanting to
send multimedia items interactively in real time, the demands on the
Net rise.  From the UK, we find access across the Atlantic on the
so-called fat pipe (actually rather a thin pipe) gets very, very slow
at times, and even within the UK using Mosaic/WWW to access remote
sites can be pretty tedious.
 
(3) The important one: New uses, including electronic journals.
Many correspondents on this list seem to be making an implicit
assumption that the future mode of access, by all academics
everywhere, to all journals, will be by the individual user calling up
the editor's site and getting the items they want over the Net in real
time.  Not only this, but it is also assumed by some people that the
same will also apply to teaching materials.  (See Martin, J., Darby,
J. & Kjollerstrom, B. (eds), Higher Education 1998 Transformed by
Learning Technology; Oxford, UK: CTISS Publications, 1994; ISBN
0 9513896 6 1)   Thus students, working in distance-learning mode, will
access the multimedia teaching materials of their chosen guru who may
be on the other side of the world.  Even setting aside the economics
of this (who pays tuition fees to whom?), and the question of whether
individual universities could even be said to exist any more in this
scenario, there is another capacity question here.  Students outnumber
academics by at least 20 to 1.  If all teaching transactions as well
as all research transactions go over the Net, what does that do for
capacity?
 
 
At present, if our university Computing Service discovers that there
are certain Internet resources that are accessed a lot from this
campus, it mirrors those resources to a machine here, so as to provide
our users with quicker access and reduce congestion on the Net.  Many
other universities do the same.  If it decided to do so with the
full-text scholarly journals on the Net -- which it might if they
began to win widespread usage on this campus -- what would it be doing
but reinventing the University Library?    Ditto with teaching
materials.  In fact, many universities are merging their computing
service and their library anyway.  Even where they are not, the two
usually work closely and co-operatively together.   But doesn't our
Computing Service's action show that there is a natural, evolutionary
approach to electronic journals that entails journals being held
locally, in something that we might as well, for convenience, refer to
as a library?
 
Thus, I think that the model of an electronic journal held in one
place only, and accessed by all users everywhere by coming in over the
Internet to the host site, without the help or intermediacy of a local
library, is likely to apply only to very esoteric journals -- the ones
that really do only have twenty people in the world who can understand
them.  I find it hard to believe that network capacity will be
adequate, or cheap enough, for all access to all journals to happen
over the Net.  I think that for many journals, it will be more
convenient, and more economic if network charges come in, for the
university library to mirror them locally.  In which case, the current
controversy on this list over the role of commercial publishers and
the cash nexus in scholarly publishing may simply come down to this:
do libraries pay subscriptions for their electronic journals (which
they may get either on CD-ROMs or down the wire) or do they get them
free?   My guess is, both -- some journals for which there is a
significant demand on their campus will fall into each category.
 
 
Fytton Rowland, Research Fellow                Phone +44 1509 223057
Dept of Information and Library Studies,       Fax   +44 1509 223053
Loughborough University of Technology,         E-mail:
Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK.     J.F.Rowland@lut.ac.uk
 
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Sep 1994 09:14:09 EDT
Reply-To:     "Adlington,Janice;Library;" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Adlington,Janice;Library;" 
Subject:      Re: How to Find Journals on the Net
In-Reply-To:  <199409270703.EAA08436@unb.ca>
 
 
Hi Tammy,
 
        Actually, a veronica search on 'zine or fanzine' wouldn't be a
bad start!  But what you might want to do first is take a walk through
some of the archives.  I'd recommend starting with
 
        gopher etext.archive.umich.edu
 
Check out the entries for Zines - and the links to Quartz and the WELL.
Now, if you're looking for something specific, email me off-list - I may
(or may not) be able to give you some leads!
 
        For scholarly/popular journals, I'd gopher to the following
addresses:
 
        gopher arl.cni.org         (Directory of Electronic Journals,
                                    Newsletters, and Academic Lists)
 
        gopher ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu    (UCSB Project)
 
        gopher gopher.enews.com    (Electronic Newstand - warning, .com)
 
 
Hope this helps.
 
                                        Jan
 
On Mon, 26 Sep 1994, Tammy Whalen wrote:
 
> The usual apologies if this question was just asked yesterday...but can
> anyone tell me of a way to locate journals on internet?  I'd just like
> to know what's there, both academic and the fanzine sort.  Here's what
> I thought of doing so far:  posting a message like this one in every
> newsgroup (I don't like the sound of that) or using veronica to search
> for the words "zine, fanzine, etc.".  Both ideas seemed pretty feeble,
> so I thought I'd ask the experts.  YES, YOU!
>
> Thanks!
>
> Tammy
>
> Operational Research and Analysis Library, Dept. of National Defence
> whalen@dgs.dnd.ca
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 14:57:34 EDT
Reply-To:     Dru W Mogge 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Dru W Mogge 
Subject:      Re: How to Find Journals on the Net
 
Just because something is online, it isn't always more up-to-date.
 
The files relating to e-journals & newsletters that are available
through the listserv at U of Ottowa are from 1992.  The information
found in the hard copy of the 4th edition of the DEJ is accurate
(to the best of our ability) as of spring 1994.
 
As someone else who responded to the original query noted, an abridged
version of the DEJ is available on the ARL gopher:
 
URL:gopher://arl.cni.org/scomm/edir/edir94
 
Dru Mogge, Electronic Services Coordinator
Association of Research Libraries
email: dru@cni.org
 
>     An electronic version (and therefore more up-to-date)  of the
> Electronic journals and newsletters portion of the above work are
> available from the U of Ottawa.
>   via email
>       Send message to: LISTSERV@UOTTAWA or LISTSERV@ACADVM1.UOTTAWA.EDU
>        saying (note the spelling!):
>            get ejournl1 directry
>            get ejournl2 directry
>
>    via anonymous FTP
>       FTP to PANDA1.UOTTAWA.CA
>       login as: anonymous
>       password: [use your email address]
>       cd /pub /religon/
>         get electronic-serials-directory.txt
>
>
>    To be alerted to the existence of new electronic journals you might
> want to subscribe to: NEWJOUR-L@E-MATH.AMS.ORG    To subscribe send an
> email message to: LISTSERV@E-MATH-AMS.ORG saying:
>    subscribe newjour-l Yourfirstname Yourlastname
>
> ***************************************************************************
> Judith Hopkins                                    716 - 645-2796 (phone)
> Technical Services Research and Analysis Officer  716 - 645-5955 (FAX)
> Lockwood Library Building
> University at Buffalo                   ULCJH@UBVM    (BITNET)
> Buffalo, NY  14260-2200                 ULCJH@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU (Internet)
>    Listowner of AUTOCAT@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
> ****************************************************************************
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 14:57:51 EDT
Reply-To:     Margaret E Sokolik 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      Re: Citing electronic publications
In-Reply-To:  <199409271313.GAA25345@uclink.berkeley.edu>
 
It is available, I just retrieved it. I'm not sure what problems people
were running into. Send a GET to LISTSERV@CMSA.BERKELEY.EDU. The filename is:
TESLEJ-L APAGUIDE
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
On Tue, 27 Sep 1994, Judith Gresham wrote:
 
> I found the file was not available yet.
>
> J. Gresham
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 14:58:17 EDT
Reply-To:     Tammy Whalen 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Tammy Whalen 
Organization: Defence Research Establishment, Ottawa, Ontario
Subject:      Re: How to Find Journals on the Net
 
Thank-you to everyone who responded so quickly!!  I'm really glad I
found your group!  My clue was an abstract which mentioned your name in
a Dialog search on electronic journals.  Why bit.listserv.vpiej-l ?
My first thought was "to keep out the riff-raff", but there's probably
more to it than that.
 
>      FTP to PANDA1.UOTTAWA.CA
And to think that this was all just 2 blocks from my office all along!
 
Thanks again!
 
Tammy
Operational Research and Analysis Library, Dept. of National Defence
whalen@dgs.dnd.ca
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 15:00:15 EDT
Reply-To:     Chris Rusbridge 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Chris Rusbridge 
Subject:      Re: Reinventing the Library
In-Reply-To:  <199409271314.JAA12620@ipe.cc.vt.edu> from "JF Rowland" at Sep 27,
              94 09:13:41 am
 
Just one aspect of the previous message needs correction:
 
> Already our Australian colleagues have to pay a
> per-transaction charge for use of the Internet, which is inhibiting
> academic use of international resources by Australian academics and
> (especially) students.  I don't suppose Australia will be the last
> country to impose such a charge.
 
This is still a proposal, not a fact, for University users of AARNet,
the Australian academic network. Some new commercial network affiliates
are now being asked to pay volume-related charges for inter-state and
international traffic (different charge rates), but the proposal to
alter the present University charges (based on total budget, ie a form
of self-top-slicing) or even existing affiliate charges for
non-University research institutions (based on bandwidth of connection)
have not yet been agreed. There are some serious objections to the
proposals, but on the other hand, AARNet usage is growing so fast that
some new means of paying for it may have to be found!
 
 
--
Chris Rusbridge
 
Library Information Systems Coordinator
Underdale campus, University of South Australia
Holbrooks Road, Underdale, SA 5032 Australia
Phone +61 8 302 6279 Fax +61 8 302 6756 email Chris.Rusbridge@UniSA.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 15:00:33 EDT
Reply-To:     Steve Minton 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Steve Minton 
Subject:      JAIR, e-journal publishing
 
There has been considerable discussion on this list about different
models for e-journals.  I thought I would mention that the Journal of
Artificial Intelligence Research (JAIR), which is available
electronically over the internet, just published its first volume in
hardcopy. Thus, the journal is published both electronically and in
the more traditional form. The hardcopy version is available from
Morgan Kaufmann publishers (see ordering information below).
 
Regards,
Steve Minton
(minton@ptolemy.arc.nasa.gov)
 
 
You can access individual JAIR articles online through a variety of means:
 
 -- By WWW. The URL is http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/jair/home.html
 -- By reading comp.ai.jair.announce and/or comp.ai.jair.papers
 -- Anonymous FTP from either of the two sites below:
      CMU:   p.gp.cs.cmu.edu        directory: /usr/jair/pub
      Genoa: ftp.mrg.dist.unige.it  directory:  pub/jair/pub
 -- By Gopher. The URL is gopher://p.gp.cs.cmu.edu
 -- By automated email: Send mail to jair@cs.cmu.edu with the subject
    AUTORESPOND and the message body HELP.
 
ORDERING INFORMATION:
 
  As noted above, Volume 1 of JAIR is presently being offered for sale
  in hardcopy by Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. It is available from your
  technical bookseller or directly from Morgan Kaufmann.
 
  PRICE: $39.95 (U.S. & Canada)/$43.95 International
  ISSN: 1076-9757
  ISBN: 1-55860-347-6
  1994; 314 pages; paper
 
  To Order from directly from Morgan Kaufmann:
                 Within U.S.& Canada - (800) 745-7323
                        Outside U.S.& Canada - (415) 392-2665
                 Fax:   (415) 982-2665
                 E-mail: orders@mkp.com
                 Mail:   340 Pine Street, Sixth Floor
                         Dept. EMJA
                         San Francisco, CA  94104
  See our WWW site or call Morgan Kaufmann for the addresses of European
  and Australian distributors.
 
  To order via email, send email to orders@mkp.com with your credit card
  number and expiration date and a current shipping address. (Some
  people are apprehensive about sending their credit card number by
  email, but many people do it and to date Morgan Kaufmann hasn't experienced
  any problems). You will get a confirmation of receipt.
 
  SHIPPING: In the U.S. and Canada, please add $4.50 for the first book and
  $2.50 for each additional book for surface shipping. For International
  shipping, please add $6.50 for the first book and $4.50 for each additional
  book.  Airmail shipping is $30.00/book.
 
  JAIR is published by AI Access Foundation and Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 15:00:53 EDT
Reply-To:     "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Subject:      Re: Reinventing the Library
 
JF Rowland  wrote
 
>At present, if our university Computing Service discovers that there
>are certain Internet resources that are accessed a lot from this
>campus, it mirrors those resources to a machine here, so as to provide
>our users with quicker access and reduce congestion on the Net.  Many
>other universities do the same.  If it decided to do so with the
>full-text scholarly journals on the Net -- which it might if they
>began to win widespread usage on this campus -- what would it be doing
>but reinventing the University Library?    Ditto with teaching
>materials.  In fact, many universities are merging their computing
>service and their library anyway.  Even where they are not, the two
>usually work closely and co-operatively together.   But doesn't our
>Computing Service's action show that there is a natural, evolutionary
>approach to electronic journals that entails journals being held
>locally, in something that we might as well, for convenience, refer to
>as a library?
>
>Thus, I think that the model of an electronic journal held in one
>place only, and accessed by all users everywhere by coming in over the
>Internet to the host site, without the help or intermediacy of a local
>library, is likely to apply only to very esoteric journals -- the ones
>that really do only have twenty people in the world who can understand
>them.  I find it hard to believe that network capacity will be
>adequate, or cheap enough, for all access to all journals to happen
>over the Net.  I think that for many journals, it will be more
>convenient, and more economic if network charges come in, for the
>university library to mirror them locally.  In which case, the current
>controversy on this list over the role of commercial publishers and
>the cash nexus in scholarly publishing may simply come down to this:
>do libraries pay subscriptions for their electronic journals (which
>they may get either on CD-ROMs or down the wire) or do they get them
>free?   My guess is, both -- some journals for which there is a
>significant demand on their campus will fall into each category.
 
The mirroring technique obviously addresses the network bandwidth problem,
but however moves the problem to that of charging and copyright. If your
organisation mirrors a journal then it will surely be held responsible to
colect and distribute royalties, police copyright protection, etc. I wonder
if this might not be enough of a burden to ensure that little if any
mirroring takes place?
 
bobj
 
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus,
          North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone: +612 325 3100  Fax: +612 325 3101
email: bob.jansen@syd.dit.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 28 Sep 1994 15:01:15 EDT
Reply-To:     Susan Farrell 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Susan Farrell 
Subject:      locating e-journals
 
Try     gopher   gopher.msstate.edu
 
They have a huge collection.
 
Susan
 
*******************************************************************
susan.farrell@gtri.gatech.edu
Research Associate I, Communications and Training Technology Branch
Electro-Optics, Environment, and Materials Laboratory
Georgia Tech Research Institute, O'Keefe 037, Atlanta GA 30332-0837 USA
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 29 Sep 1994 10:35:48 EDT
Reply-To:     Margaret E Sokolik 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Margaret E Sokolik 
Subject:      Re: Citing electronic publications
In-Reply-To:  <199409282033.NAA06520@uclink.berkeley.edu>
 
Okay, let's hope this is the last time for this.  I think the problem
with getting the APAGUIDE for those who have had difficulties, is that
you didn't include also the LISTNAME in your GET.
 
The full command to LISTSERV@CMSA.BERKELEY.EDU is:
 
GET TESLEJ-L APAGUIDE TESLEJ-L
    ^^^^^^^  ^^^^^^^  ^^^^^^^^
  filename1 filename2 listname
 
This is always the format for ordering a file off of a specific
list.  Otherwise, I think the request just defaults to the main listserv
directory, where mostly informational stuff about LISTSERV is kept. If
this doesn't work, then we're in trouble, especially since I retrieved it
without any problems.
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
 
Maggi Sokolik, Editor
TESL-EJ
msokolik@uclink.berkeley.edu
 
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Sep 1994 08:29:09 EDT
Reply-To:     Roger Collins 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Roger Collins 
Subject:      Re: Citing electronic publications
 
On 28th September Maggi Sokolik wrote, re the APAGUIDE:-
 
"It is available, I just retrieved it"..
 
Well, I tried this morning (10.30AM Sept 29th) and got the "not yet available"
message...Could it be that the LISTSERV at Berkeley is generating different
responses for internal and external clients ? ( I note that Maggi's
address is:-    ...@uclink.berkeley.edu  ).
 
Roger Collins
U.C.C.
Kamloops, B.C.
CANADA
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Sep 1994 08:29:31 EDT
Reply-To:     SBURRIGH@LIBRARY.WRIGHT.EDU
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Scott Burright 
Organization: Wright State University
Subject:      (Fwd) Re: Reinventing the Library
 
A footnote to the discussion on charging for Net access per-use, by
volume, by bandwidth etc.:
 
IMHO, the irony of such "cost recovery" schemes is that metering,
accounting and billing constitute most of the costs being recovered!
 
Scott Burright
Networked Info Resources Librarian
Wright State University
Dayton, OH 45435
sburrigh@library.wright.edu
 
"I claim sole responsibility for the content of this
 message. Opinions expressed herein are not necessarily
 those of any institution or professional body."
 
     **** REMEMBER: Never send cash by e-mail! ****
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Sep 1994 08:29:48 EDT
Reply-To:     SBURRIGH@LIBRARY.WRIGHT.EDU
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Scott Burright 
Organization: Wright State University
Subject:      (Fwd) Re: Reinventing the Library
 
Writes bobj:
>The mirroring technique obviously addresses the network bandwidth
problem,
>but however moves the problem to that of charging and copyright. If
your
>organisation mirrors a journal then it will surely be held responsible
to
>colect and distribute royalties, police copyright protection, etc. I
wonder
>if this might not be enough of a burden to ensure that little if any
mirroring takes place?
 
As far as I know, the only people in scholarly journal publishing who
see any royalties are paper publishers.  Authors do not expect
royalties, as they are (we hope) motivated by the intrinsic value of
scholarly communication.  Therefore, copyright and royalties are
moot issues in the e-journal arena, IMHO.
 
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus,
          North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone: +612 325 3100  Fax: +612 325 3101
email: bob.jansen@syd.dit.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------
 
Scott Burright
Networked Info Resources Librarian
Wright State University
Dayton, OH 45435
sburrigh@library.wright.edu
 
"I claim sole responsibility for the content of this
 message. Opinions expressed herein are not necessarily
 those of any institution or professional body."
 
     **** REMEMBER: Never send cash by e-mail! ****