VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

June 1995

=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 2 Jun 1995 16:13:02 EDT
Reply-To:     Edward Vielmetti 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Edward Vielmetti 
Organization: Coast to Coast Telecommunications, Inc.
Subject:      ISO 10283 "Serials, Electronic Manuscript" DTD
 
It looks like I am going to be using this DTD pretty heavily
over the course of my next project, and I was hoping to find
some kindred souls who were in the same situation.
 
The eventual delivery platform is some combination of specialized
SGML viewers and general purpose HTML viewers, and there is a body
of page images that goes along with the marked up text just to
make things special.  From reading the comp.text.sgml archives
it appears clear that the maths part is a challenge; I'm inclined
to believe that the entire citation / bibliographic apparatus
is going to be a good piece of effort as well esp. if the
logical progression toward Hytime linking is used.
 
I have an undated, unmarked draft of the standard, and have managed
to find a pointer to EPSIG ("Electronic Publishing Special Interest
Group") at http://www.sil.org/sgml/epsig.html (Robin Cover's archive).
I'm sure there's other projects underway that have as their goal
some substantial body of work completed within this DTD, or perhaps
using DTDs based substantially on this one - I'd like to see a big
more of that compiled in one place to help the process along.
 
thanks
 
Ed
 
Edward Vielmetti
U of Michigan Humanities Text Initiative
 
emv@coast.net
emv@umich.edu (not working just yet)
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Jun 1995 11:14:36 EDT
Reply-To:     Susan Davis 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Susan Davis 
Subject:      CALL FOR PAPERS-1996 NASIG CONFERENCE
 
This message is being cross-posted to a number of lists.  Please
excuse any duplication.  Thank you for your attention.
 
 
                   11TH ANNUAL NASIG CONFERENCE (1996):
              CALL FOR PAPERS, WORKSHOPS, AND PRECONFERENCES
 
"Pioneering New Serials Frontiers: From Petroglyphs to
Cyberserials"
 
The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG), an
organization that serves the interests of U.S., Canadian and
Mexican members of the serials information chain, will make a
stop on scenic Route 66 in 1996.  Our eleventh annual conference
to be held June 20-23, 1996 at the University of New Mexico in
Albuquerque, a city which balances the prehistoric past with a
high-tech present.  NASIG's annual conference provides a forum in
which librarians, publishers, vendors, educators, binders,
systems developers, and other serials specialists exchange views,
present new ideas, proactively seek solutions to common problems,
and discuss matters of current interest.  The proceedings are
published in Serials Librarian and in electronic format on the
NASIG gopher.
 
NASIG's Program Planning Committee invites proposals for plenary
papers and preconferences that deal with "big picture" aspects of
the theme.  We are especially interested in papers or pre-
conference ideas that will explore the pioneering boundaries and
relationships of NASIG's various constituencies.  Examples:
* a new generation of multi-media serials publications
* can electronic serials be adequately preserved/archived?
* the role of preprint databases in scholarly communication
* emerging roles for libraries, publishers and vendors
* the development of strategic alliances between commercial firms
     and non-profit institutions
* how scholars and the academy view the serials frontier
* is access in lieu of ownership really working?
* the end-user as selector or "collection manager"
* what kinds of serials do users want?
* AACR2 and the information age: is the code still relevant?
* will the World Wide Web replace the online catalog?
 
The Committee also invites workshop and preconference proposals
that will provide practical ideas and assistance in dealing with
an information world which combines both print and electronic
serial publications.  Examples:
* cooperative serials collection development projects
* cataloging electronic/multimedia serials/the Internet
* reorganizing to meet new customer expectations
* educating/retraining serialists for emerging information roles
* serials processing/cataloging resources found on the Internet
* how to obtain customer feedback
* new technologies/services/software packages/standards
* writing successful grants
* Internet use by publishers and vendors
* techniques for preserving electronic/paper serials
 
NASIG invites anyone in the information community to submit
proposals and suggested topics/speakers.  The Program Planning
Committee reserves the right to combine, blend, or refocus
proposals to maximize program breadth and relevance to our
membership.  As a result, only one presenter from proposals
submitted by teams may be invited to participate.
 
Since proposals are reviewed competitively, please include
complete information for maximum consideration:
* name, address, telephone/fax numbers, and e-address of the
     proposer(s)
* program title
* a 200-300 word abstract clearly explaining the proposal and,
     if appropriate, its relevance to our theme
* a prioritized preference for the proposal: plenary, workshop,
     or preconference
 
Proposals should be submitted -- via e-mail if at all possible --
no later than August 1, 1995 to Susan Davis, NASIG Secretary, to
receive consideration.  Send proposals to:
 
   Susan Davis
   Head, Periodicals
   University at Buffalo
   Lockwood Library Bldg.
   Buffalo, NY 14260-2200
   fax: 716-645-5955
   email: UNLSDB@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
 
*****************************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 7 Jun 1995 11:15:17 EDT
Reply-To:     Peter Anthony Busch 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Peter Anthony Busch 
Subject:      Thesis
 
Hi all,
 
I am doing a Ph.D. in the area of strategic dissemination of information to
and through the public sector by way of data communications networking and
of course the net.
 
Any references peeple may be aware of in the area would be appreciated.
 
Cheers,
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Peter Busch                             AARNet: Peter.Busch@cs.utas.edu.au
Department of Computer Science                           Phone: 002 202907
University of Tasmania                                     Fax: 002 202913
GPO Box 252C, Hobart, Tasmania  7001
 
 
 
So gewiss ist der allein gluecklich und gross, der weder zu herrschen noch
gehorchen braucht, um Etwas zu sein.
                             (Goethe   Goetz von Berlichingen   Act 1 :39)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 8 Jun 1995 15:56:25 EDT
Reply-To:     "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Dr. Bob Jansen" 
Subject:      Help Needed
 
I am starting a project that is investigating the process of producing
electronic journals. We are targetting two journals, a paper journal (the
Australian Journal of Chemistry) and an electronic journal (PSYCHE).
 
The aim is to compare the process of converting both journals to various
formats, ie. SGML, HTML, CD_ROM-based,etc, and see what
difference/difficulties/constraints are imposed by coming from paper or by
coming from an ASCII-based ftp journal. What does the writer need to be
aware of if they are targetting an electronic journal rather than a paper
journal. And what about the reader, should they be able to do anything or
should the author/publisher constrain their access and if so to what?
 
I am responsible for investigating the document models aspect of this
process, ie. can we produce a single DTD or are the journals and their
readers significantly different to warant separate DTD's. Should we go
TEI/ODA/SGML/HTML/ISO 12083/etc?
 
I am looking for pointers to other standards/systems for electronic
journals. Does anybody know of something else than the above. In
particular, I need software, preferably Macintosh-based, to try out
different DTD's in the different markup languages. Does any body have
anything or know of anything that I can use and where I can get it? The
results of this project will be available electronically, and I have
already made contact with several subscribers to the list who have
described similar activities.
 
All help appreciated.
 
bobj
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus,
          North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone:  +61-2-325 3100  Mobile: 041 115 0037 Fax: +61-2-325 3101
email:  bob.jansen@dit.csiro.au
URL:    http://mac145.syd.dit.csiro.au/
---------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 8 Jun 1995 15:57:29 EDT
Reply-To:     Manny Ratafia 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Manny Ratafia 
Organization: Yale University
Subject:      Text Search Shareware for Word for Windows
 
 
I thought members of this list would be interested in our
shareware program for Word for Windows.
 
Basically, CommTech PowerSearch helps people handle large amounts
of text.
 
After you have tried it, I would be very interested to hear what
you think about it.
 
Feel free to forward this message to any appropriate lists.
 
                                   Manny Ratafia
                                   tmgmail@yalevm.ycc.yale.edu
 
CommTech PowerSearch can be downloaded by ftp from
oak.oakland.edu (look for the file called POWERSCH.ZIP under the
directory \SimTel\win3\winword\).
 
POWERSCH.ZIP is also available for download from America Online
and CompuServe. Or, you can use CommTech's BBS at 203/ 495-8604.
 
For more information, send e-mail with
"CommTech PowerSearch Info" in the SUBJECT to
tmgmail@yalevm.ycc.yale.edu.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 12 Jun 1995 13:38:00 EDT
Reply-To:     judith.messimer@Mosby.COM
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Judith Riddell Messimer 
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
     I also am interested in producing electronic journals, and am
     interested in ideas from others. I am working with SGML and have one
     DTD for my journals.
     Does anyone know about ArborText Document Architect?
     Thanks,
     Judith
 
 
______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Help Needed
Author:  "Dr. Bob Jansen"  at INTERNET
Date:    6/9/95 3:55 PM
 
 
I am starting a project that is investigating the process of producing
electronic journals. We are targetting two journals, a paper journal (the
Australian Journal of Chemistry) and an electronic journal (PSYCHE).
 
The aim is to compare the process of converting both journals to various
formats, ie. SGML, HTML, CD_ROM-based,etc, and see what
difference/difficulties/constraints are imposed by coming from paper or by
coming from an ASCII-based ftp journal. What does the writer need to be
aware of if they are targetting an electronic journal rather than a paper
journal. And what about the reader, should they be able to do anything or
should the author/publisher constrain their access and if so to what?
 
I am responsible for investigating the document models aspect of this
process, ie. can we produce a single DTD or are the journals and their
readers significantly different to warant separate DTD's. Should we go
TEI/ODA/SGML/HTML/ISO 12083/etc?
 
I am looking for pointers to other standards/systems for electronic
journals. Does anybody know of something else than the above. In
particular, I need software, preferably Macintosh-based, to try out
different DTD's in the different markup languages. Does any body have
anything or know of anything that I can use and where I can get it? The
results of this project will be available electronically, and I have
already made contact with several subscribers to the list who have
described similar activities.
 
All help appreciated.
 
bobj
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Bob Jansen
Principal Research Scientist
CSIRO Division of Information Technology
Physical: Building E6B, Macquarie University Campus,
          North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Postal: Locked Bag 17, North Ryde NSW 2113, AUSTRALIA
Phone:  +61-2-325 3100  Mobile: 041 115 0037 Fax: +61-2-325 3101
email:  bob.jansen@dit.csiro.au
URL:    http://mac145.syd.dit.csiro.au/
---------------------------------------------------------
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 12 Jun 1995 13:38:31 EDT
Reply-To:     IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         IAN.WORTHINGTON@classics.utas.edu.au
Subject:      *ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY* 3,1
 
As a subscriber to *Electronic Antiquity* you are now being contacted
to let you know that Volume 3 Issue 1 (June 1995) is now available.
A list of contents and access instructions follow.
 
 
*ELECTRONIC ANTIQUITY:
COMMUNICATING THE CLASSICS*
 
ISSN 1320-3606
 
Peter Toohey (Founding Editor)
Ian Worthington (Editor)
 
EDITORIAL BOARD
 
Jenny Strauss-Clay (Virginia)
Elaine Fantham (Princeton)
Joseph Farrell (Pennsylvania)
Sallie Goetsch (Michigan)
Mark Golden (Winnipeg)
Peter Green (Austin)
William Harris (Columbia)
Brad Inwood (Toronto)
Barry Powell (Wisconsin)
Harold Tarrant (Newcastle, NSW)
 
(01) LIST OF CONTENTS
 
(02) ARTICLES
 
Alexanderson, B., 'Ad Jacobi De Voragine Legendam Auream
        Adnotationes Criticae'
 
(03) REVIEWS
 
*When the Lamp is Shattered: Desire and Narrative in Catullus*
by Micaela Janan
        Reviewed by Jacqueline Clarke
 
*Greek Rational Medicine: Philosophy from Alcmaeon to
the Alexandrians* by James Longrigg
        Reviewed by Mark Timmins
 
*The Athenian Cavalry* by Ian Spence
        Reviewed by J.K. Anderson
 
(04) KEEPING IN TOUCH
 
Accommodation in UK
 
*Didaskalia* Supplement 1
 
Conference:
*Aspects of Power in the Ancient World*
        Australian National University, 12-14 July 1995
        (Abstracts)
 
Electronic Forums & Repositories for the Classics
        by Ian Worthington
 
(05) GUIDELINES FOR CONTRIBUTORS
 
*Electronic Antiquity* Vol. 3 Issue 1 - June 1995
edited by Peter Toohey and Ian Worthington
antiquity-editor@classics.utas.edu.au
ISSN 1320-3606
------------------------
A general announcement (aimed at non-subscribers) that
the journal is available will be made in approximately 12
hours time over the lists - as a subscriber you will be
automatically contacted in advance when future issues
are available.
 
The editors welcome contributions (all articles will be refereed,
however a section - *Positions* - will exist for those wishing
to take a more controversial stance on things).
 
HOW TO ACCESS
 
Access is via gopher or ftp or www.
The journal file name of this issue is 3,1-June1995.
Previous issues may also be accessed in the same way.
 
GOPHER:
 
-- info.utas.edu.au and through gopher:
-- open top level document called Publications
-- open Electronic Antiquity.
-- open 3,1-June1995.
-- open (01)contents first for list of contents, then other files as appropriate
 
FTP:
 
-- ftp.utas.edu.au (or info.utas.edu.au)
        --> departments --> classics --> antiquity.
-- In Antiquity you will see the files as described above.
 
WWW:
 
ftp://ftp.utas.edu.au/departments/classics/antiquity/3,1-June1995
 
(end)
==============
 
 __--_|\
/  oz    \
\__.--._/
        V
       tas
 
Ian Worthington,
Department of Classics,
University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania 7001,
Australia.
Tel. (002) 20-2294 (office: direct)
Fax (002) 20-2288
e-mail:  Ian.Worthington@classics.utas.edu.au
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 13 Jun 1995 07:32:12 EDT
Reply-To:     BLEUEL@MZDMZA.ZDV.UNI-MAINZ.DE
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Jens Bleuel 
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
 
>
> I am responsible for investigating the document models aspect of this
> process, ie. can we produce a single DTD or are the journals and their
> readers significantly different to warant separate DTD's. Should we go
> TEI/ODA/SGML/HTML/ISO 12083/etc?
>
> I am looking for pointers to other standards/systems for electronic
> journals. Does anybody know of something else than the above.In
> particular, I need software, preferably Macintosh-based, to try out
> different DTD's in the different markup languages. Does any body have
> anything or know of anything that I can use and where I can get it? The
> results of this project will be available electronically, and I have
> already made contact with several subscribers to the list who have
> described similar activities.
 
 I think there is also a trend to:
 
 Adobe Acrobat, PDF (Portable Document Format)
 
 Netscape will include a viewer for PDF in it's browser.
 
 Further information:
 http://www.adobe.com/Acrobat/Acrobat0.html
 ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/Applications/Acrobat
 
 Good luck
 
 Jens Bleuel
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 14 Jun 1995 10:05:00 EDT
Reply-To:     "Frank E. Harris" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Frank E. Harris" 
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
Dear Jens Bleuel:
 
At the Optical Society of America we publish four journals using two DTDs,
ISO12083 and the AAP DTD.  We have found that when journal formats are very
similar it is easier to maintain one DTD with a few slight differences in
the output specifications than a separate DTD for each journal.
 
The reason we do not have all journals in a single DTD at this time is the
costs associated with changing DTDs.  ISO 12083 is adequate for all of our
journals, but the AAP DTD required some modifications.  We are phasing it
out.
 
HTML is inadequate to produce printed journal pages.
 
 
 
>>
>> I am responsible for investigating the document models aspect of this
>> process, ie. can we produce a single DTD or are the journals and their
>> readers significantly different to warant separate DTD's. Should we go
>> TEI/ODA/SGML/HTML/ISO 12083/etc?
>>
>> I am looking for pointers to other standards/systems for electronic
>> journals. Does anybody know of something else than the above.In
>> particular, I need software, preferably Macintosh-based, to try out
>> different DTD's in the different markup languages. Does any body have
>> anything or know of anything that I can use and where I can get it? The
>> results of this project will be available electronically, and I have
>> already made contact with several subscribers to the list who have
>> described similar activities.
>
> I think there is also a trend to:
>
> Adobe Acrobat, PDF (Portable Document Format)
>
> Netscape will include a viewer for PDF in it's browser.
>
> Further information:
> http://www.adobe.com/Acrobat/Acrobat0.html
> ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/Applications/Acrobat
>
> Good luck
>
> Jens Bleuel
 
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 
--
Frank E. Harris                      fharri@osa.org
Optical Society of America           fharris@aip.org
2010 Massachusetts AVE NW            Phone - 202-416-1904
Washington, DC 20036-1023            http://192.239.36.3
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Jun 1995 11:30:36 EDT
Reply-To:     "Frank E. Harris" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Frank E. Harris" 
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
Dear VPIEJ listers:
 
I received the following as a personal message, but I thought it might be
of value to some readers.
 
Re:
>>At the Optical Society of America we publish four journals using two DTDs,
>>ISO12083 and the AAP DTD.  We have found that when journal formats are very
>                             ^^^^^^^
>        ** would you mind translating these acronyms???  I am actively
>involved in
>        journal [for profit] publication on the Web, but I am totally
>unfamiliar with
>        these terms.   Help would be appreciated and illucidating!  8^)
 
SGML = Standard Generalized Markup Language  (Invented at IBM, but adopted
as an official standard by ISO as ISO 8879.
 
DTD = Document Type Definition.  ISO 8879 tells you how to write or use a DTD.
 
ISO 12083 = another standard, the "European Physics Book/Article/Serial
DTD."  Used by a growing number of Societies, mainly in America.  It is the
only DTD that comes close to having everything. for everyone in the field
of Physics.  It may be overkill for humanities.  It is very complex.
 
AAP DTD = Association of American Publishers DTD.  Great for magazine
articles.  A bit weak on math but very good all around.
 
HTML 1.0 = The HTML 1.0 "standard" was written up as a DTD.  It is one of
the simplest and most forgiving DTDs around.  But HTML browsers are
expected to good at interpreting bad HTML.  Since everyone uses extended
versions of HTML that go far beyond the standard, there is a debate whether
HTML is a variety of SGML, or a mutant form.
 
 
--
Frank E. Harris                      fharri@osa.org
Optical Society of America           fharris@aip.org
2010 Massachusetts AVE NW            Phone - 202-416-1904
Washington, DC 20036-1023            http://192.239.36.3
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Jun 1995 11:31:26 EDT
Reply-To:     d.keown@gold.ac.uk
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         d.keown@gold.ac.uk
Subject:      Re: The Great 30/70 Debate
X-cc:         serialst@uvmvm.BITNET
 
At 15:48 14/06/95 +0100, Stevan Harnad wrote:
 

 
>Another suggestion: Why not archive the hyperjournal-forum discussion as
>a Hypermail Archive on the Hypermail Home Page? All the list owner needs
>to do is to save all the postings in a unix mail file, with headers.
>The Hypermail sofware does all the rest. See my Hypermail Archive as a
>sample:
>
>http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Hypermail/index.html
 
Nice idea. Hypermail is coming to the HyperJournal mail archive in the next
few weeks, so let's see what can be done then.
 
Damien Keown
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Jun 1995 11:31:47 EDT
Reply-To:     Ann Okerson 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads
 
 
The following is an announcement about a new book from ARL.  It
features a long discussion about the future of scholarly journals,
in particular the potential for a re-conceptualized system driven
by and controlled by scholars.    Please excuse any cross-postings.
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
ann@cni.org
________________________
 
 
ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH LIBRARIES
PRESS RELEASE
June 15, 1995
 
 
        Book Explores a Subversive Future for Scholarly Journals
 
 
        ARL's Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing announces the
publication of Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads: A Subversive
Proposal for Electronic Publishing.  This book captures an Internet
discussion about scientific and scholarly journals and their future that
took place on a number of electronic forums starting in June 1994 and
peaking in the fall.  Subsequent electronic conversations between the
principals and interested parties continue until now (the last message
captured in the book is dated March 21, 1995).  Given the powerful
opportunities that electronic networking technologies offer to scholars
and scientists, the future of publishing will be debated for years to
come.  This book is one attempt to capture a key conversation between
the stakeholders in scholarly communications.
 
        Six principal discussants and about two dozen others advance
radical and traditional views; they argue for overhaul of journal
publication systems or advocate careful preservation of traditional
values and roles.  Will electronic technologies save us from the
economic pressures of the current papyrocentric publishing system or
will they be more expensive than we dreamed? In his "Overture to the
Subversive Proposal," Stevan Harnad (Cognitive Scientist, University of
Southampton) writes, "For centuries, it was only out of reluctant
necessity that authors of esoteric publications entered into the
Faustian Bargain of allowing a price tag to be erected as a barrier
between their work and its intended readership, for that was the only
way they could make their work public at all during the age when paper
publication was their only option."
 
        Lorrin Garson (pioneer and leader in electronic publishing at
the American Chemical Society) responds, "I would like to suggest that
publishing electronic journals is in fact going to be more expensive
than printing.  The collection, maintenance and dissemination of these
data will be more costly than printing, but the information will be much
more valuable to the scientific community.  Of course, when we get to
this point we won't be publishing journals; the output will be called
something else." Paul Ginsparg (Los Alamos National Laboratories),
Bernard Naylor (Librarian, University of Southampton), Andrew Odlyzko
(AT&T Bell Labs), and Frank Quinn (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University) also offer thoughtful essays and provocative
viewpoints.
 
        Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads makes publishing history.
It is the first time that a book derived from a series of wide-ranging
Internet discussions on a scholarly topic recreates (insofar as
possible) an e-mail experience for a general academic and publishing
audience.
 
        In their Conclusion, Ann Okerson (ARL) and James O'Donnell
(Professor of Classics, University of Pennsylvania), the editors of this
9-month long networked conversation write, "This is a book about hope
and imagination in one corner of the emerging landscape of cyberspace.
It embraces passionate discussion of an idea for taking to the Internet
to revolutionize one piece of the world of publishing."
 
        The book includes a detailed table of contents, specially
written introductory and concluding chapters by the co-editors, a
"hyperlink" bibliography showing where materials in the book can be read
on the Internet, and a glossary of terms used by the discussants.
 
        The Association of Research Libraries is a not-for-profit
organization representing 119 research libraries in the United States
and Canada.  Its mission is to shape and influence forces affecting the
future of research libraries in the process of scholarly communication.
ARL programs and services promote equitable access to, and effective use
of recorded knowledge in support of teaching, research, scholarship, and
community service.  These programs include annual statistical
publications, federal relations and information policy, and enhancing
access to scholarly information resources through telecommunications,
collection development, preservation, and bibliographic control.  The
Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing works to identify and
influence the forces affecting the production, dissemination, and use of
scholarly and scientific information.
 
        The book is produced in 7 x 10 format, paperbound, in 250 pages.
Its ISBN number is: 0-918006-26-0
 
        The raw source files from which the Subversive Book is derived
can be found on the Internet as follows:
 
        ftp to the site ftp.princeton.edu
        cd pub/harnad/Psycoloquy/Subversive.Proposal
 
To contact the editors:
 
        Ann Okerson (ann@cni.org)
        James O'Donnell (jod@ccat.sas.upenn.edu)
 
To receive detailed order information by e-mail:  osap@cni.org
 
All other inquiries:
 
        Patricia Brennan
        Information Services Coordinator
        Association of Research Libraries
        21 Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 800
        Washington, DC  20036
        patricia@cni.org
        phone:  202-296-2296
        fax:  202-872-0884
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Jun 1995 11:32:03 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      The Great 30/70 Debate
X-cc:         serialst@uvmvm.BITNET
 
> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 1995 21:59:45 -0700
> To: hyperjournal-forum@mailbase.ac.uk
> From: gotsch@leland.stanford.edu (Carl Gotsch)
> Subject: Economics of E-Journals
>
> In a recent talk, Robert Simoni, Professor of Biology at Stanford and one of
> the editors of the prestigious Journal of Biological Chemistry, provided the
> following data on the Stanford Libraries/JBC collaboration to publish the
> JBC electronically. (http://www-jbc.stanford.edu/jbc/)
>
>         (1)  JBC publishes 600 pages weekly of material in the fast-moving
> field of biological chemistry and molecular biology. The material contains
> numerous graphs, chemical symbols, and equations.
>
>         (2)  The budget of the journal in its print version is $7.8 million.
> The association that publishes the journal has calculated that it would save
> roughly $2.5 million annually (30%) by eliminating actual printing and
> distribution costs.
 
Carl Gotsch's posting raises again the contentious issue of whether the
true savings on e-only journals will be 30%, as most publishers reckon
it, or 70%, as I and most other actual e-only journal publishers reckon
it. There is a discussion of this in:
 
ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad/Psycoloquy/Subversive.Proposal
 
The source of the discrepancy is that implementing peer review and
redaction alone does not cost 70% of paper page costs in e-only
journals; my own estimate is that it costs closer to 30% or lower.
It only costs 70% IF YOU KEEP THE PAPER WAY OF DOING THINGS IN PLACE
and merely subtract paper printing and distribution costs from current
expenses. But of course a lot of restructuring goes with going
electronic only, and in the process many paper line-items (like
subscription and fulfillment, and, to be fair, all overheads from any
parallel paleolithic paper operations) vanish.
 
Instead of continuing to do these abstract calculations, why not just
get the real data from the actual editorial offices of the small but
growing fleet of brave new e-only journals?
 
The Subversive Discussion is being published as a book edited by Ann
Okerson of the Association of Research Libraries. She also edits the
annually updated Directory of Electronic Journals. The email addresses
of all the editorial offices are contained therein.
 
Another suggestion: Why not archive the hyperjournal-forum discussion as
a Hypermail Archive on the Hypermail Home Page? All the list owner needs
to do is to save all the postings in a unix mail file, with headers.
The Hypermail sofware does all the rest. See my Hypermail Archive as a
sample:
 
http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/Hypermail/index.html
 
----------------------------------------------------------------
    Stevan Harnad
    Editor, PSYCOLOQUY (sci.psychology.digest)
 
    Department of Psychology
    University of Southampton
    Highfield, Southampton
    SO17 1BJ UNITED KINGDOM
 
    psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
    phone: +44 1703 594-583
    fax:   +44 1703 593-281
--------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/
    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/
    ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad
    gopher://gopher.princeton.edu/11/.libraries/.pujournals
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 15 Jun 1995 11:32:53 EDT
Reply-To:     Patricia A Hatch 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Patricia A Hatch 
Subject:      Project Muse
 
 
Hello out there,
 
Can anyone provide me with information about Project Muse?  My
understanding is that it is a group of libraries that formed a consortia
for the purpose of purchasing electronic journals at a discounted rate.
They may be based at Johns Hokins, but the information I have is sketchy,
and my queries via veronica and other internet resources garnered
nothing.  I have also check the American Library Directory and Library
Literature, but I have been unable to locate any information.
 
        If you have any information about this project, I would greatly
appreciate your contacting me privately via email.  Thank you in advance
for any information you can provide.
 
Patty Hatch
Serials Librarian
Cardinal Cushing Library
Emmanuel College
Boston, MA
email: pah@world.std.com
phone: (617) 735-9927
fax:   (617) 735-9763
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Jun 1995 09:11:04 EDT
Reply-To:     Kevin Ward 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Kevin Ward 
Subject:      Re: Project Muse
In-Reply-To:  
 
 
You might look at the Project Muse homepage at http://muse.mse.jhu.edu
 
                Kevin
 
                                    /\
 
                                Kevin Ward
                      Library and Information Science
                <          University of Illinois         >
                          ward@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu
                      http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~ward
 
                                    \/
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Jun 1995 09:11:29 EDT
Reply-To:     Cindy Hepfer 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Cindy Hepfer 
Subject:      ACRL Journal Costs in Academic Libraries Discussion Group
 
Cross-posted to several lists; please excuse any duplication.
 
 
       ALA ACRL JOURNAL COSTS IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES DISCUSSION GROUP
                 ALA ANNUAL CONFERENCE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
                   SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1995  2:00-4:00 PM
                       MCCORMICK PLACE COMPLEX, E252
 
 
         "Surviving the Serials Crisis: Are E-Journals an Answer?"
 
 
Join the ACRL Journal Costs in Academic Libraries Discussion Group
for a exploration of the costs associated with producing and
distributing e-journals.  Presenters include a librarian associated
with Johns Hopkin's Project Muse, two staff members from the University
of Chicago Press, and a product specialist from OCLC's Electronic
Journals Online.
 
We will also be treated to some thoughts from Walt Crawford, co-author
of a recent ALA publication, Future Libraries: Dreams, Madness, &
Reality, on e-journals and other ways of dealing with the journal
crisis.
 
 
Speakers:
 
Todd Kelley, Librarian for Information Technology Initiatives,
             Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins University
 
Patricia Scarry, Associate Journals Manager/Marketing Manager,
                 University of Chicago Press
 
Evan Owens, Information Systems Manager, University of Chicago Press
 
Daviess Menefee, Consulting Product Specialist, Electronic Journals
                 Online, OCLC
 
Walt Crawford, Access Services Group and Development Division,
               Research Libraries Group, Inc.
 
 
Discussion Group Chair/Panel Moderator:
 
Cindy Hepfer, Serials Librarian, State University of New York at
              Buffalo, Health Sciences Library
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 16 Jun 1995 09:12:01 EDT
Reply-To:     Kevin Ward 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Kevin Ward 
Subject:      Re: The Great 30/70 Debate
In-Reply-To:  <27812.9506141448@cogsci>
 
 
 
Stevan Harnad wrote:
 
>
> Instead of continuing to do these abstract calculations, why not just
> get the real data from the actual editorial offices of the small but
> growing fleet of brave new e-only journals?
 
OK, I'll bite.  I would so much like to hear some real numbers that I now
am asking about the operating budget of Psycoloquy.  In a recent issue of
_Serials Review_ you mentioned that Psycoloquy operated on $15,000 per
year - So I am requesting a break-down of that amount.  Perhaps then we
all can compare that itemization to our own working budgets - those of us
in the print world.  It seems a bit slim, $15,000, but I guess if you are
doing it it must be possible.  Or is there a large subsidy behind that
number?  Is all this talk about 30/70 truly aimed at a universal e-journal
industry or is it just for those who are sitting pretty behind a
university-sponsored server who also receive free system administration?
 
Trust me, if this can be proven through actual working examples, I - and
most likely several others - will be converted to this model.  It is
really the time to pass these 'abstract calculations' and hear from those
who are producing e-journals about the 'real' costs involved.
 
                        Kevin Ward
 
                                    /\
 
                                Kevin Ward
                      Library and Information Science
                <          University of Illinois         >
                          ward@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu
                      http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~ward
 
                                    \/
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:22:19 EDT
Reply-To:     Geoffrey Eaton EXTEP 31834 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Geoffrey Eaton EXTEP 31834 
Subject:      Re: Project Muse
 
        Project MUSE is the fruit of Johns Hopkins University's effort to
publish all forty-odd of its journals electronically.  JHU's system boasts
several interesting features: hypertext bibliographies, a search engine, a
convenient and straightforward approach to subscriptions and licensing, and
more.
 
        Last I checked MUSE offered three or four journals, with more
anticipated  soon.  You can find out more at JHU's Web site; look under the icon
for the university's libraries.
 
 
        Geoffrey Paul Eaton
        World Bank Publications
        geaton@worldbank.org
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:23:05 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      e-journal budgets
X-cc:         hyperjournal-forum@mailbase.ac.uk, serialst@uvmvm.BITNET
 
> Date:         Fri, 16 Jun 1995 09:12:01 EDT
> From: Kevin Ward 
>
> OK, I'll bite.  I would so much like to hear some real numbers that I now
> am asking about the operating budget of Psycoloquy.  In a recent issue of
> _Serials Review_ you mentioned that Psycoloquy operated on $15,000 per
> year - So I am requesting a break-down of that amount.  Perhaps then we
> all can compare that itemization to our own working budgets - those of us
> in the print world.  It seems a bit slim, $15,000, but I guess if you are
> doing it it must be possible.  Or is there a large subsidy behind that
> number?  Is all this talk about 30/70 truly aimed at a universal e-journal
> industry or is it just for those who are sitting pretty behind a
> university-sponsored server who also receive free system administration?
>
> Trust me, if this can be proven through actual working examples, I - and
> most likely several others - will be converted to this model.  It is
> really the time to pass these 'abstract calculations' and hear from those
> who are producing e-journals about the 'real' costs involved.
 
Glad you asked. No secret hidden subsidies so far! But Psycoloquy is
atypical for one specific reason, so not the right journal on which to
base extrapolations: It is a journal of Open Peer Commentary. Most
journals are not. If an article is accepted, there is a call for
multiple commentary. The only journals like this are (1) Current
Anthropology (CA) (published by University of Chicago Press), (2) the
paper journal I edit, Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS) (published by
Cambridge University Press), which is explicitly modeled on CA, and (3)
3-4 further Open Peer Commentary journals (such as Psychological
Inquiry and New Ideas in Psychology) that are modeled on BBS.
 
Nor can I compare Psycoloquy's budget with BBS's because Psycoloquy's
submission rate is still so much lower. One day it may be possible to
compare, but not yet. The comparison now would be flattering to
Psycoloquy, but meaningless because of the scale differences.
 
I think the best comparisons will be with conventional journals with
comparable subject matter, submission rates, acceptance rates, annual
article quotas, and readership. (To be most informative, they should
also be equal in number of years of publication, so new journals are
compared with new journals, where start-up costs can be compared, and
low initial volume can be equated.)
 
So far, I think some of the new maths and computer science elecectronic
journals are in the best position to provide data for comparing with
their paper homologues, but there may be others. Comparing Psycoloquy
to BBS at this point would really be misleading.
 
I might add that Psycoloquy's budget is about to grow a bit, in order
to set up a system to hypertextify it. That will be in the category of
temporary seeding costs, however, rather than long-term costs.
 
The breakdown of Psycoloquy's 15K subsidy from the American
Psychological Association is easy: It all goes into paying Editorial
Assistants and Copy Editors to (1) handle the refereeing correspondence,
(2) copy edit and format accepted articles, and (3) maintain the
listserv version. With the hypertextification grant, there will also be
the cost of (4) html mark-up.
 
----------------------------------------------------------------
    Stevan Harnad
    Editor, PSYCOLOQUY (sci.psychology.digest)
 
    Department of Psychology
    University of Southampton
    Highfield, Southampton
    SO17 1BJ UNITED KINGDOM
 
    psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
    phone: +44 1703 594-583
    fax:   +44 1703 593-281
--------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/
    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/
    ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad
    gopher://gopher.princeton.edu/11/.libraries/.pujournals
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:24:09 EDT
Reply-To:     "Frank E. Harris (by way of horn@pobox.upenn.edu Charles Horn)"
              
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Frank E. Harris (by way of horn@pobox.upenn.edu Charles Horn)"
              
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
Dear Jens Bleuel:
 
At the Optical Society of America we publish four journals using two DTDs,
ISO12083 and the AAP DTD.  We have found that when journal formats are very
similar it is easier to maintain one DTD with a few slight differences in
the output specifications than a separate DTD for each journal.
 
The reason we do not have all journals in a single DTD at this time is the
costs associated with changing DTDs.  ISO 12083 is adequate for all of our
journals, but the AAP DTD required some modifications.  We are phasing it
out.
 
HTML is inadequate to produce printed journal pages.
 
 
 
>>
>> I am responsible for investigating the document models aspect of this
>> process, ie. can we produce a single DTD or are the journals and their
>> readers significantly different to warant separate DTD's. Should we go
>> TEI/ODA/SGML/HTML/ISO 12083/etc?
>>
>> I am looking for pointers to other standards/systems for electronic
>> journals. Does anybody know of something else than the above.In
>> particular, I need software, preferably Macintosh-based, to try out
>> different DTD's in the different markup languages. Does any body have
>> anything or know of anything that I can use and where I can get it? The
>> results of this project will be available electronically, and I have
>> already made contact with several subscribers to the list who have
>> described similar activities.
>
> I think there is also a trend to:
>
> Adobe Acrobat, PDF (Portable Document Format)
>
> Netscape will include a viewer for PDF in it's browser.
>
> Further information:
> http://www.adobe.com/Acrobat/Acrobat0.html
> ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/Applications/Acrobat
>
> Good luck
>
> Jens Bleuel
 
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 
--
Frank E. Harris                      fharri@osa.org
Optical Society of America           fharris@aip.org
2010 Massachusetts AVE NW            Phone - 202-416-1904
Washington, DC 20036-1023            http://192.239.36.3
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:24:24 EDT
Reply-To:     "Ann Okerson (by way of horn@pobox.upenn.edu Charles Horn)"
              
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Ann Okerson (by way of horn@pobox.upenn.edu Charles Horn)"
              
Subject:      Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads
 
 
The following is an announcement about a new book from ARL.  It
features a long discussion about the future of scholarly journals,
in particular the potential for a re-conceptualized system driven
by and controlled by scholars.    Please excuse any cross-postings.
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
ann@cni.org
________________________
 
 
ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH LIBRARIES
PRESS RELEASE
June 15, 1995
 
 
        Book Explores a Subversive Future for Scholarly Journals
 
 
        ARL's Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing announces the
publication of Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads: A Subversive
Proposal for Electronic Publishing.  This book captures an Internet
discussion about scientific and scholarly journals and their future that
took place on a number of electronic forums starting in June 1994 and
peaking in the fall.  Subsequent electronic conversations between the
principals and interested parties continue until now (the last message
captured in the book is dated March 21, 1995).  Given the powerful
opportunities that electronic networking technologies offer to scholars
and scientists, the future of publishing will be debated for years to
come.  This book is one attempt to capture a key conversation between
the stakeholders in scholarly communications.
 
        Six principal discussants and about two dozen others advance
radical and traditional views; they argue for overhaul of journal
publication systems or advocate careful preservation of traditional
values and roles.  Will electronic technologies save us from the
economic pressures of the current papyrocentric publishing system or
will they be more expensive than we dreamed? In his "Overture to the
Subversive Proposal," Stevan Harnad (Cognitive Scientist, University of
Southampton) writes, "For centuries, it was only out of reluctant
necessity that authors of esoteric publications entered into the
Faustian Bargain of allowing a price tag to be erected as a barrier
between their work and its intended readership, for that was the only
way they could make their work public at all during the age when paper
publication was their only option."
 
        Lorrin Garson (pioneer and leader in electronic publishing at
the American Chemical Society) responds, "I would like to suggest that
publishing electronic journals is in fact going to be more expensive
than printing.  The collection, maintenance and dissemination of these
data will be more costly than printing, but the information will be much
more valuable to the scientific community.  Of course, when we get to
this point we won't be publishing journals; the output will be called
something else." Paul Ginsparg (Los Alamos National Laboratories),
Bernard Naylor (Librarian, University of Southampton), Andrew Odlyzko
(AT&T Bell Labs), and Frank Quinn (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University) also offer thoughtful essays and provocative
viewpoints.
 
        Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads makes publishing history.
It is the first time that a book derived from a series of wide-ranging
Internet discussions on a scholarly topic recreates (insofar as
possible) an e-mail experience for a general academic and publishing
audience.
 
        In their Conclusion, Ann Okerson (ARL) and James O'Donnell
(Professor of Classics, University of Pennsylvania), the editors of this
9-month long networked conversation write, "This is a book about hope
and imagination in one corner of the emerging landscape of cyberspace.
It embraces passionate discussion of an idea for taking to the Internet
to revolutionize one piece of the world of publishing."
 
        The book includes a detailed table of contents, specially
written introductory and concluding chapters by the co-editors, a
"hyperlink" bibliography showing where materials in the book can be read
on the Internet, and a glossary of terms used by the discussants.
 
        The Association of Research Libraries is a not-for-profit
organization representing 119 research libraries in the United States
and Canada.  Its mission is to shape and influence forces affecting the
future of research libraries in the process of scholarly communication.
ARL programs and services promote equitable access to, and effective use
of recorded knowledge in support of teaching, research, scholarship, and
community service.  These programs include annual statistical
publications, federal relations and information policy, and enhancing
access to scholarly information resources through telecommunications,
collection development, preservation, and bibliographic control.  The
Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing works to identify and
influence the forces affecting the production, dissemination, and use of
scholarly and scientific information.
 
        The book is produced in 7 x 10 format, paperbound, in 250 pages.
Its ISBN number is: 0-918006-26-0
 
        The raw source files from which the Subversive Book is derived
can be found on the Internet as follows:
 
        ftp to the site ftp.princeton.edu
        cd pub/harnad/Psycoloquy/Subversive.Proposal
 
To contact the editors:
 
        Ann Okerson (ann@cni.org)
        James O'Donnell (jod@ccat.sas.upenn.edu)
 
To receive detailed order information by e-mail:  osap@cni.org
 
All other inquiries:
 
        Patricia Brennan
        Information Services Coordinator
        Association of Research Libraries
        21 Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 800
        Washington, DC  20036
        patricia@cni.org
        phone:  202-296-2296
        fax:  202-872-0884
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:25:44 EDT
Reply-To:     Tamas Szabo <100105.2072@compuserve.com>
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Tamas Szabo <100105.2072@compuserve.com>
Subject:      electronic publishing in Internet
 
Fast and simple electronic publishing in CompuServe or INTERNET
---------------------------------------------------------------
(optimal for first time authors in the WorldWideWeb)
 
Please test the new, compact publishing framework available
for download in CompuServe. FREEWARE for distribution with
your SHAREWARE/FREEWARE publications.
 
Applications:
 
- electronic publishing,
- education, distant education,
 
Introduction:
 
- Compact framework for electronic publishing, only 5% storage
  on a standard 1.4 MB diskette, 95% free for text.
- Converts text file into modular HyperText.
- Option: Converts to WordWideWeb standard HTML.
- No more passive readers: common platform for reading and authoring.
- Minimal learning effort, for first time authors in WorldWideWeb
- Shorten the gap: reader, first time author, author.
- Readers response, reader letters in hypertext format.
- FREEWARE  (for school, university, public domain, ...)
 
Available for download in CompuServe:
---------------------------------------------------------------------
       GO INETRESO   LIB-9  (Internet tools)
       GO HPHAND     LIB-11 (HP-Palmtops and Notebooks)
 
       Program-Name: "ASC-HYP.ZIP"
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
economic balance:
 
"low cost ASCII publishing <---> higher cost HyperText publishing"
The tool ASC-HYP is focused on economic authoring, also if you have a
limited number of readers for a specific topic, minimum of overhead
and minimal learning effort for navigation in the documents.
 
ASC-HYP / Text to HyperText, compact publishing tool
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The programs works on IBM compatible notebooks, desktop computer,
  also on HP200LX Palmtop-Computer from Hewlett Packard.
 
ABSTRACT
 
(*) Operating environments: MSDOS, Windows or OS/2.
(*) converts ASCII text files into modular HyperTexts,
(*) includes HyperText authoring and publishing tool for extensions,
new connections, line drawing editor for pictures in HyperText,
(*) compact, free to copy, free of charge framework, include
with your HyperText publications, minimum overhead (IBM compatible),
(*) optional converson: HyperText to HTML, compatible with browser
in INTERNET, UNIX or Macintosh. HTML is standard format in INTERNET.
 
You find lot of valuable information in CompuServe or Internet
in ASCII files! Modernize - convert ASCII to modular HyperText!
 
Please test this compact publishing framework, download from CompuServe.
FREEWARE for distribution with your SHAREWARE/FREEWARE publications.
 
best wishes
                                          Bernhard-Roessner-Str. 13
Tamas Szabo                               82194 Groebnezell / Germany
PC DatenBank GmbH                         Phone: +4981427650
E-Mail: CompuServe 100105,2072            FAX:   +49814258366
 
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:26:01 EDT
Reply-To:     Betty Landesman 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Betty Landesman 
Subject:      ALCTS Serials Section Committee to Study Serials Standards meeting
 
This message is being posted to multiple lists.  Please excuse any
duplication.
 
At the upcoming ALA annual conference, the ALCTS Serials Section
Committee to Study Serials Standards will be meeting at on Monday, June
26, from 4:30-5:30, MCC-E253 B.  At this meeting, the second of our two
meetings at the conference, we will be discussing what we should be doing
at future meetings: what aspects of the subject "serials standards"
should be discussed? who should we invite to attend our meetings?  etc.
 
Your input is not only wanted, but needed!  If you wish to attend the
meeting and share your ideas, you will be a welcome participant.  If you
have ideas but will not be at the meeting, please send them to me via E-mail
and I will bring them to the meeting on your behalf.  (Please remember to
reply directly to me, not to whatever list you are reading!!!)
 
I look forward to seeing you/hearing from you.
 
Betty Landesman                         Phone:    202-994-1333
Coordinator, Systems Planning           FAX:      202-463-6205
Gelman Library                          BITNET:   betty@gwuvm
George Washington University            Internet:
2130 H Street NW                          betty@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu
Washington, DC   20052
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:26:53 EDT
Reply-To:     Craig Mulder <20676cam@msu.edu>
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Craig Mulder <20676cam@msu.edu>
Subject:      ACRL Discussion Group on Electronic Library Development
 
                         *************************
 
                       The ACRL Discussion Group on
            Electronic Library Development in Academic Libraries
 
                         will host a discussion on:
 
          DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECTS: WHAT QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED
 
                         Saturday, June 24, 1995
                          11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
 
                           E252 McCormick Place
 
 
There are many projects developing prototypes of the digital library and
these projects are the subject of several programs at ALA.  But how do
these projects relate to your needs?  Do they address the questions you
have?  What are those questions?
 
In this session, you will have the opportunity to talk about these issues
in a group of 6-10 people.  After half an hour, the small groups will share
their list of questions with the entire group.
 
Come ready to participate in what promises to be a fruitful discussion.
 
Note: a compilation of the group's questions will be posted to these lists
following ALA.
 
 
 
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________
Craig Mulder, Human Health Sciences Librarian
20676cam@msu.edu         | A217D East Fee Hall
517/432-3819             | Michigan State University
Fax: 517/353-8926        | East Lansing, MI  48824-1316
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:27:14 EDT
Reply-To:     weibel@oclc.org
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         weibel@oclc.org
Subject:      Re: The Great 30/70 Debate
 
 
 
Salary of a scholar                        $50,000
 
Fringes, lights, equipment,
heat, etc.                                 $25,000
 
 
Fully loaded cost of a scholar:            $75,000
@ 2500 hours per year
 
loaded cost of a professional:    about $30.00 an hour
 
loaded cost of clerical staff:    about $15.00 an hour
 
OK, editors, how many hours of professional and clerical work is needed
in a year to put out a respectable scholarly journal?
 
Is it possible to do it with 10 hours per week of clerical effort and 5
hours a week of a professional's time? That works out to $15,000.
 
And frankly, I won't be convinced by numbers from the "actual editorial
offices of the small but growing fleet of brave new e-only journals..."
till it is clear that (1) they are significant vehicles of scholarly thought
in their field, and (2) that they operate on a *sustainable* basis, not
simply on the enthusiasm of one or two devotees.  If a bus runs over
the editor, will the journal survive?  No... better still...  if the
editor's children need college tuition will it survive?
 
stu
  (whose kids are getting older faster than his savings are getting bigger ;-)
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 20 Jun 1995 08:28:26 EDT
Reply-To:     Zsolt Orczan 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Zsolt Orczan 
Subject:      E-journal Conference
 
 
 
 ___MAGYAR ELEKTRONIKUS TOZSDE____________________________HU-ISSN_1216-0229
HUNGARIAN ELECTRONIC EXCHANGE     copyright  1990.
 
Dear Sir,
We organize an international
******************************************************************
                 ELECTRONIC JOURNAL CONFERENCE
******************************************************************
 
      ***  WE INVITE JOURNALISTS, EDITORS and PUBLISHERS  ***
                      to  BUDAPEST, HUNGARY
                      on  November 9-10-11 ,1995
 
TOPICS:
* ELECTRONIC JOURNAL WRITING, EDITING AND PUBLISHING
*  PUBLIC RELATIONS IN THE E-JOURNAL, GOPHER AND WWW
 
CALL FOR PAPERS
Papers are invited on all subjects mentioned. Please submit ASCII text and
image (uuencode) [written in English] 5.000 words containing a
65 character/line a brief abstract (at max. 5 lines long)
 
MET@huearn.sztaki.hu
subject: papers
 
Lecture Authors will be notified about the acceptance of  papers by August
20, 1995. The conference proceedings are intended to be
published on flopy disc.
 
CONFERENCE LANGUAGE:  English (translation into Hungarian)
 
 
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Csaba S. Orczan [chair]
Zsolt Orczan Dr [co-chair)   orczanz@mars.iif.hu
 
SOCIAL PROGRAMME
Welcome Cocktail                                     November 9,  1995
Excursion , Theatre,  Opera...
 
CALL FOR PARTICIPATION
To participate in the conference please fill in and e-mail the attached
Registration Form to the met@huearn.sztaki.hu at your earliest
convenience.  Please note that for early registration a reduced fee is
applicable.  You will receive the confirmation of your participation and
the detailed program in due time.
 
Early Registration until August 20, 1995
FEES
                          before August 20,            after
                              299 USD                 350 USD
ACCOMPANYING PERSONS
are welcome and may attend the welcome cocktail, the Conference reception
and the lunches on the conference days
at a fee of: 120 USD
 
PAYMENT
Participants are kindly requested to transfer the fees to the following:
 
MoneyGram to AMERICAN EXPRESS BUDAPEST HUNGARY-1052, ORCZAN Zsolt
 
or POSTA BANK Budapest H-1920 account number: 131-121844 ORCZAN Zsolt
 
Please note that in case of cancellation only a 50 % of the
paid fee will be refunded.
 
CONFERENCE SECRETARIAT
 
MET Budapest Pf.311 Hungary H-1536
e-mail: met@huearn.sztaki.hu
 
........................cut here..........................................
REGISTRATION FORM
 
Family Name:...              ... male/female
First Name(s):...
Address:...
e-mail:...
Telephone:...
I intend to submit a paper  ... yes/no
Title /area of paper:...
Technical equipment required:...
 
I pay the fee MoneyGram ... yes/no or  Bank account ...yes/no
transaction date:...    and number......
 
I register ...  accompanying persons.
Please send me information about available accomodations ... yes/no
I need a hotel room ... single/double
luxus...five star(*****)...four star (****)...three star (***)...yes/no
Date from ...... to ......
 
Please inform me about  Excursion, Theatre, or Opera... yes/no
 
......................cut here...........................................
                    About BUDAPEST
 
In 1835, an English peer by the name of John Paget got his
first look of Buda and Pest from the crest of Gellert Hill. Of
what he saw there he wrote as follows: "Buda with its blue
chain of hills, Pest with its yellow plain, and the majestic
Danube with its green isles were all sprawled out at our
feet... and we sat for some time, enthralled by all that
beauty... One hundred and fifty years have passed since the
ousting of the Turk, and in this space of time, the city has
risen from squalid ruins to become one of the great cities of
Europe. Pest owes its progress not to the good will of a
benevolent ruler, but to its natural endowments and the en-
ergy of its people... It lies on the banks of a river that
traverses half of Europe, and may expand unbounded in
every direction. All this leads one to anticipate a splendid
future for Pest-Buda."
 
 It is interesting to compare Paget's description with the
observation made by the geographer Kohl from Bremen just
seven years later. The order-loving German appraised the
city with satisfaction: "Pest was conceived in an orderly
manner, the city plan was elaborated with proper circum-
spection. The main thoroughfares leading in every direction
from the centre of the town are broad and straight." The
haphazardness of Buda, however, was less to his liking.
"There is no sign of planning. The streets are neither cen-
tralized nor straight; consequently, the town has no core,
and in its network of streets, one will find nothing that re-
sembles order. The reason for this is the unfavourable soil
and the fact that the roads are cut off by hills, preventing the
population from building their houses in a rational manner."
 Whether we think of the past or the present, the descrip-
tion is faithful. Whether to its advantage or otherwise, Pest
is comparable to other big cities lying on the plain. But Buda
is unique, like Stockholm, Istanbul, or Rio, and this is due
precisely to its "disorderliness". Pest may expand without
constraint, but Buda is bound by the surrounding hill coun-
try. In the course of its development, Pest has smothered
and devoured its environment, as most big cities do. But
even today, Buda is inseparable from it, despite the fact that
the "peaceful coexistence" between man and nature is being
increasingly threatened. More and more houses are appear-
ing on the formerly sparsely populated hillsides, and the ten-
tacles of urbanization feel their way not only upward: they
bore their way into the remotest hollows of the valleys.
Small plots of land are being congested by large houses, and
even sometimes entire neighbourhoods; the gardens are
shrinking, the woods receding into the distance. New roads
are being built, public utilities, service accommodations es-
tablished.
 Nevertheless, Buda continued to be characterized not so
much by its wreath of hills as by the fragmentedness of its
inner area. It has no rational geometrical scheme. The inner
city hills - Rozsadomb, Naphegy, Varhegy (Castle Hill),
Gellert-hegy and Sashegy, - which boast perhaps the
world's only big city nature conservation area, divide the
body of the town into sections, thus giving the whole a diver-
sified, exciting aspect. The old sixteenth-century Italian say-
ing according to which the world has three gems: Venice on
the water, Florence on the plain, and Buda on the hill, in all
probability still holds true, and so does the ironic saying of
Hungarian architects, according to which the natural en-
dowments of Buda are so beautiful that even they, the ar-
chitects. can't wipe them out completely.
 
Please reply as soon as possible!
Yours  sincerely,
Dr. ORCZAN, Zsolt & ORCZAN Csaba
 
| MET Publisher: ORCZAN, Zsolt  e-mail.:orczanz@mars.iif.hu               |
| MET Chief editor: ORCZAN, Csaba  e-mail.:orczanc@mars.iif.hu            |
***  MET   BUDAPEST PoBox. 311.  HUNGARY,  H-1536  ****   MET@HUEARN   ****
 
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 09:49:10 EDT
Reply-To:     Steve Minton 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Steve Minton 
Subject:      E-journal Budgets
 
I thought I'd provide some information regarding the electronic journal that
I edit, the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research. JAIR also
publishes a paper version, but I won't include the costs for that.
(In fact, I don't have a detailed breakdown of the costs for the paper
version.)
 
Currently, JAIR does not charge for electronic subscriptions. All our
editorial help is provided on a volunteer basis, and our servers are
maintained for free by various universities and research labs.  In
other words, we are completely subsidized by the research community.
I would argue that this is a completely reasonable arrangement.
 
How do our (subsized) costs differ from traditional paper computer science
journals?  I've edited a paper journal in the past, so I can make some
comparisons.
 
 -- With many CS journals, the editors are unpaid -- same with JAIR.
    BTW, I would note that in CS, editing a journal is considered "part of
    the job" for many researchers, and their employers regularly provide
    this subsidy. Computer scientists are relatively well-paid people as
    well, even in academia. Maybe our field is unusual this way...
 
 -- Low level editorial help: JAIR has no costs in this area. Computer
    scientists may be a bit odd, but they *like* to do their
    own formatting and they generally dislike having to work
    with copy editors who invariable *introduce* errors.
    Initially, I think our lack of a professional production staff
    caused some minor problems, in that our articles were not as uniform
    as some paper journals. But at this point, I think JAIR articles look
    reasonably professional. (Check it out yourself --
    http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/jair/home.html)
 
 -- Cost of distribution: As noted above JAIR is completely subsidized
    since our servers are provided on a volunteer basis. But, it seems
    to me that the increment cost of providing such subsidies is quite
    low for research institutions. Don't know exact figures, unfortunately.
 
 -- Clerical help. In my dual roles as executive editor
    and "electronic publisher", I require about 8 hours of week of
    clerical help which is currently subsidized by my employer.
    It's more help than I required for the paper journal I used to
    edit, but not much more. (The difference is due to the fact that
    my assistant and I have to handle some of the correspondence regarding
    submissions and publication that would have been handled by the
    jorunal's paid production staff.  Doesn't require much time, however,
    since all correspondence is done via email.)
 
>And frankly, I won't be convinced by numbers from the "actual editorial
>offices of the small but growing fleet of brave new e-only journals..."
>till it is clear that (1) they are significant vehicles of scholarly thought
>in their field, and (2) that they operate On a *sustainable* basis, not
>simply on the enthusiasm of one or two devotees.
 
With respect to (1), JAIR is certainly a "significant vehicle" in the
AI community. There are many AI journals, but in in my humble opinion
:-) we are currently the second best journal in the field.  Actually,
I'm serious about this -- I believe this is a fairly common
perception. We are quickly compiling an excellent citation rate
(although not in all subareas of AI). We have a reasonably high
submission rate (> 100 papers per year) and a low acceptance rate (<
20%, last time I looked).  JAIR quick rise in prominence is primarily
a result of the "value added" that we offer (e.g., quick turnaround
time, online appendices), but it is not strictly a function of the
fact that the journal is electronic.  As you might expect, we had to
overcome the "stigma" of being an ejournal, and that's something we
are still battling. (Having a large and prestigious set of editorial board
members helps us significantly here.)
 
The story with respect to (2) is not as clear. As noted above, JAIR is
effectively being subsidized by several institutions in the research
community that provide us with space on their servers, etc. (UWash,
Carnegie-Mellon, University of Genoa, and NASA). Personally, I
think this arrangment is very reasonable, and we are under no
pressure to change our arrangements. However, we may move to a "user
fee" subscription service in the future if we decide to provide
additional services or our advisory board decides that alternate
arrangments would be more stable.
 
>If a bus runs over
>the editor, will the journal survive?  No... better still...  if the
>editor's children need college tuition will it survive?
 
We'll know in a year or so, since that's when I'm planning on handing
on the baton... I personablly have little doubt JAIR will survive.
It's become too successful to die easily.
 
- Steve Minton
  JAIR executive editor
 
 
PS. In case it wasn't clear from the above, our current budget is
exactly $0.  We receive no money other than the subisidies mentioned
above (volunteer editing and servers). Well, perhaps I should mention
that JAIR was started with a small grant to pay for legal help.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 09:50:02 EDT
Reply-To:     "Cameron, Leslie" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Cameron, Leslie" 
Organization: APA
Subject:      e-journal costs
 
I'm curious as well about the actual costs of putting together and
distributing an electronic journal.   Harnad notes that "the breakdown of
Psycoloquy's 15K subsidy from the American Psychological Association is
easy: It all goes into paying Editorial
Assistants and Copy Editors to (1) handle the refereeing correspondence,
(2) copy edit and format accepted articles, and (3) maintain the listserv
version. With the hypertextification grant, there will also be the cost
of (4) html mark-up."   What kind of other resources do you draw on to
get Psycoloquy put together and out the door, so to speak?   e.g.,
volunteer hours from students and others?  support from the university?
and mind giving a sense of the kind of hours you yourself put in on a
regular basis?    Leslie Cameron
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 09:50:27 EDT
Reply-To:     "Frank E. Harris" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Frank E. Harris" 
Subject:      Re: Help Needed
 
>Read your note about formats. You can download the Shareware program DocMaker
>from America OnLine. It is wonderful for electronic journals. You also might
>investigate using HyperCard. Fairly easy to format, as is SuperCard.
>
>--Yvette
 
Dear Yvette,
 
I've been writing for e-journals using Hypercard, SuperCard, and
Hyperstudio (all very similar) since 1989.  It's nice to know some people
still believe in these formats.  They represent a different document model
than SGML and HTML.
 
In SGML and HTML, you have a shell of text that is intepreted by a display
program that handles the formatting.  Graphics, animation, hyperlinks and
other interactive features are handled by the interpreter/browser.  There
is greater potential for platform independence in this model.
 
In Hypercard, SuperCard, and HyperStudio, text exists within a text object
within a card.  A card is essentially a piece of programming, an "object"
in the parlance of modern programming.  Some objects like cards may hold
other objects like text, buttons, or grahics, etc..  This program/oriented
document model is much more platform dependent.  Of Hypercard, SuperCard,
and HyperStudio, only HyperStudio is available in PC (and Apple 2) versions
as well as the Mac version.
 
If you are concerned about your data being readable in the indefinite
future, it is best to use the SGML model.
 
 
--
Frank E. Harris                      fharri@osa.org
Optical Society of America           fharris@aip.org
2010 Massachusetts AVE NW            Phone - 202-416-1904
Washington, DC 20036-1023            http://192.239.36.3
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 11:27:25 EDT
Reply-To:     "Michael R. Boudreau" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Michael R. Boudreau" 
Subject:      Re: E-journal Budgets
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
Two small points:
 
 
> -- Low level editorial help: JAIR has no costs in this area. Computer
>    scientists may be a bit odd, but they *like* to do their
>    own formatting and they generally dislike having to work
>    with copy editors who invariable *introduce* errors.
                                    ^
And they also catch ones like this.
 
 
>    Initially, I think our lack of a professional production staff
>    caused some minor problems, in that our articles were not as uniform
>    as some paper journals. But at this point, I think JAIR articles look
>    reasonably professional.
     ^^^^^^^^^^
 
Of course what this means in practice varies from one person to another,
but I think an argument can be made for aiming for a higher standard.  As
the volume of information on the Internet increases, good copyediting and
design will be as important as ever--if not more so--in making the
mountains of text understandable as well as easy on the eyes.
 
God help us all if everything we have to read is copy edited and formatted
to the standards of computer scientists.
 
--Mike
 
 
 
========================================
Michael Boudreau
Electronic Publishing Specialist
University of Illinois Press
1325 S. Oak Street
Champaign, IL 61820
phone: 217-244-7177    fax: 217-244-8082
 
URL: http://ux1.cso.uiuc.edu/~boudreau
========================================
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 16:36:38 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re: e-journal costs
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Date:   Thu, 22 Jun 1995 09:50:02 EDT
> From: "Cameron, Leslie" 
>
> I'm curious as well about the actual costs of putting together and
> distributing an electronic journal. Harnad notes that "the breakdown of
> Psycoloquy's 15K subsidy from the American Psychological Association is
> easy: It all goes into paying Editorial Assistants and Copy Editors to
> (1) handle the refereeing correspondence, (2) copy edit and format
> accepted articles, and (3) maintain the listserv version. With the
> hypertextification grant, there will also be the cost of (4) html
> mark-up." What kind of other resources do you draw on to get Psycoloquy
> put together and out the door, so to speak? e.g., volunteer hours from
> students and others? support from the university? and mind giving a
> sense of the kind of hours you yourself put in on a regular basis?
> Leslie Cameron
 
Everyone who does work for Psycoloquy is paid except the referees (who
don't get paid by paper journals either). The University provides
Internet facilities for all faculty, students and staff. My
contribution varies with the submission rate, but it amounts to a few
hours a week some weeks, none other weeks. As I said, though, the
submission rate is not yet anywhere near comparable to that of the
paper journal I edit, Behavioral and Brain Sciences (and this, namely,
a healthy, self-sustaining submission rate of manuscripts of sufficient
quality -- nothing else -- represents the real threshold that e-only
journals must reach in order to succeed). My guess is that even when
Psycoloquy does attain that rate, the total cost won't be more
than two or three times the present one to cover all expenses. How to
recover $50K per year (once all journals cost about that much)? It
could be done from a subsidy from a library consortium's much eased
budget and/or author page charges ($250 per article could easily be
covered by an author's research grant, in exchange for refereeing and
publication in a [by then] prestigious journal instantly and
ubiquitously available to all for free).
 
----------------------------------------------------------------
    Stevan Harnad
    Editor, PSYCOLOQUY (sci.psychology.journals.psycoloquy)
 
    Department of Psychology
    University of Southampton
    Highfield, Southampton
    SO17 1BJ UNITED KINGDOM
 
    psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
    phone: +44 1703 594-583
    fax:   +44 1703 593-281
--------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/psyc.html
    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
    gopher://gopher.princeton.edu:70/11/.libraries/.pujournals
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/
    ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad
    news:sci.psychology.journals.psycoloquy
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 22 Jun 1995 16:38:00 EDT
Reply-To:     Reginald Gibbons 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Reginald Gibbons 
Subject:      e-journals
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
Having read for many months the messages about the true costs of e-journals
vs. printed ones, I am wondering if it wouldn't be reasonable to add to the
estimated costs of e-journals the cost of maintaining the electronic data
for *all* future generations.  Once the copy of the printed journal goes out
to individual and institutional subscribers, the publisher's obligation to
*preserve* the journal has been completely met, and is effectively
transferred to libraries, at no cost whatsoever to the publisher of the
journal.  What about the implied costs of e-journals which the publisher has
to maintain in digital form forever, as perhaps the only central location
with a complete "copy" of the journal?  Any thoughts about this archival
value of a journal and the cost thereof to the electronic publisher?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
rgibbons@nwu.edu (Reginald Gibbons)
Professor of English and Editor of TRIQUARTERLY magazine,
an international journal of writing, art and cultural inquiry
 
Reginald Gibbons, 708 491 7614, fax: 708 467 2096
Mailing address: TriQuarterly magazine
Northwestern University
2020 Ridge Ave.
Evanston IL 60208
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Jun 1995 12:55:58 EDT
Reply-To:     Charles Horn 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Charles Horn 
Subject:      Re: e-journals
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>Having read for many months the messages about the true costs of e-journals
>vs. printed ones, I am wondering if it wouldn't be reasonable to add to the
>estimated costs of e-journals the cost of maintaining the electronic data
>for *all* future generations.  Once the copy of the printed journal goes out
>to individual and institutional subscribers, the publisher's obligation to
>*preserve* the journal has been completely met, and is effectively
>transferred to libraries, at no cost whatsoever to the publisher of the
>journal.  What about the implied costs of e-journals which the publisher has
>to maintain in digital form forever, as perhaps the only central location
>with a complete "copy" of the journal?  Any thoughts about this archival
>value of a journal and the cost thereof to the electronic publisher?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
>rgibbons@nwu.edu (Reginald Gibbons)
>Professor of English and Editor of TRIQUARTERLY magazine,
>an international journal of writing, art and cultural inquiry
>
>Reginald Gibbons, 708 491 7614, fax: 708 467 2096
>Mailing address: TriQuarterly magazine
>Northwestern University
>2020 Ridge Ave.
>Evanston IL 60208
>
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Jun 1995 12:56:28 EDT
Reply-To:     Charles Horn 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Charles Horn 
Subject:      Re: e-journal costs
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>> Date:   Thu, 22 Jun 1995 09:50:02 EDT
>> From: "Cameron, Leslie" 
>>
>> I'm curious as well about the actual costs of putting together and
>> distributing an electronic journal. Harnad notes that "the breakdown of
>> Psycoloquy's 15K subsidy from the American Psychological Association is
>> easy: It all goes into paying Editorial Assistants and Copy Editors to
>> (1) handle the refereeing correspondence, (2) copy edit and format
>> accepted articles, and (3) maintain the listserv version. With the
>> hypertextification grant, there will also be the cost of (4) html
>> mark-up." What kind of other resources do you draw on to get Psycoloquy
>> put together and out the door, so to speak? e.g., volunteer hours from
>> students and others? support from the university? and mind giving a
>> sense of the kind of hours you yourself put in on a regular basis?
>> Leslie Cameron
>
>Everyone who does work for Psycoloquy is paid except the referees (who
>don't get paid by paper journals either). The University provides
>Internet facilities for all faculty, students and staff. My
>contribution varies with the submission rate, but it amounts to a few
>hours a week some weeks, none other weeks. As I said, though, the
>submission rate is not yet anywhere near comparable to that of the
>paper journal I edit, Behavioral and Brain Sciences (and this, namely,
>a healthy, self-sustaining submission rate of manuscripts of sufficient
>quality -- nothing else -- represents the real threshold that e-only
>journals must reach in order to succeed). My guess is that even when
>Psycoloquy does attain that rate, the total cost won't be more
>than two or three times the present one to cover all expenses. How to
>recover $50K per year (once all journals cost about that much)? It
>could be done from a subsidy from a library consortium's much eased
>budget and/or author page charges ($250 per article could easily be
>covered by an author's research grant, in exchange for refereeing and
>publication in a [by then] prestigious journal instantly and
>ubiquitously available to all for free).
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------
>    Stevan Harnad
>    Editor, PSYCOLOQUY (sci.psychology.journals.psycoloquy)
>
>    Department of Psychology
>    University of Southampton
>    Highfield, Southampton
>    SO17 1BJ UNITED KINGDOM
>
>    psyc@pucc.princeton.edu
>    phone: +44 1703 594-583
>    fax:   +44 1703 593-281
>--------------------------------------------------------------------
>    http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/psyc.html
>    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
>    gopher://gopher.princeton.edu:70/11/.libraries/.pujournals
>    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/
>    ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad
>    news:sci.psychology.journals.psycoloquy
>
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Jun 1995 12:57:21 EDT
Reply-To:     Charles Horn 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Charles Horn 
Subject:      Re: E-journal Budgets
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
>I thought I'd provide some information regarding the electronic journal that
>I edit, the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research. JAIR also
>publishes a paper version, but I won't include the costs for that.
>(In fact, I don't have a detailed breakdown of the costs for the paper
>version.)
>
>Currently, JAIR does not charge for electronic subscriptions. All our
>editorial help is provided on a volunteer basis, and our servers are
>maintained for free by various universities and research labs.  In
>other words, we are completely subsidized by the research community.
>I would argue that this is a completely reasonable arrangement.
>
>How do our (subsized) costs differ from traditional paper computer science
>journals?  I've edited a paper journal in the past, so I can make some
>comparisons.
>
> -- With many CS journals, the editors are unpaid -- same with JAIR.
>    BTW, I would note that in CS, editing a journal is considered "part of
>    the job" for many researchers, and their employers regularly provide
>    this subsidy. Computer scientists are relatively well-paid people as
>    well, even in academia. Maybe our field is unusual this way...
>
> -- Low level editorial help: JAIR has no costs in this area. Computer
>    scientists may be a bit odd, but they *like* to do their
>    own formatting and they generally dislike having to work
>    with copy editors who invariable *introduce* errors.
>    Initially, I think our lack of a professional production staff
>    caused some minor problems, in that our articles were not as uniform
>    as some paper journals. But at this point, I think JAIR articles look
>    reasonably professional. (Check it out yourself --
>    http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/jair/home.html)
>
> -- Cost of distribution: As noted above JAIR is completely subsidized
>    since our servers are provided on a volunteer basis. But, it seems
>    to me that the increment cost of providing such subsidies is quite
>    low for research institutions. Don't know exact figures, unfortunately.
>
> -- Clerical help. In my dual roles as executive editor
>    and "electronic publisher", I require about 8 hours of week of
>    clerical help which is currently subsidized by my employer.
>    It's more help than I required for the paper journal I used to
>    edit, but not much more. (The difference is due to the fact that
>    my assistant and I have to handle some of the correspondence regarding
>    submissions and publication that would have been handled by the
>    jorunal's paid production staff.  Doesn't require much time, however,
>    since all correspondence is done via email.)
>
>>And frankly, I won't be convinced by numbers from the "actual editorial
>>offices of the small but growing fleet of brave new e-only journals..."
>>till it is clear that (1) they are significant vehicles of scholarly thought
>>in their field, and (2) that they operate On a *sustainable* basis, not
>>simply on the enthusiasm of one or two devotees.
>
>With respect to (1), JAIR is certainly a "significant vehicle" in the
>AI community. There are many AI journals, but in in my humble opinion
>:-) we are currently the second best journal in the field.  Actually,
>I'm serious about this -- I believe this is a fairly common
>perception. We are quickly compiling an excellent citation rate
>(although not in all subareas of AI). We have a reasonably high
>submission rate (> 100 papers per year) and a low acceptance rate (<
>20%, last time I looked).  JAIR quick rise in prominence is primarily
>a result of the "value added" that we offer (e.g., quick turnaround
>time, online appendices), but it is not strictly a function of the
>fact that the journal is electronic.  As you might expect, we had to
>overcome the "stigma" of being an ejournal, and that's something we
>are still battling. (Having a large and prestigious set of editorial board
>members helps us significantly here.)
>
>The story with respect to (2) is not as clear. As noted above, JAIR is
>effectively being subsidized by several institutions in the research
>community that provide us with space on their servers, etc. (UWash,
>Carnegie-Mellon, University of Genoa, and NASA). Personally, I
>think this arrangment is very reasonable, and we are under no
>pressure to change our arrangements. However, we may move to a "user
>fee" subscription service in the future if we decide to provide
>additional services or our advisory board decides that alternate
>arrangments would be more stable.
>
>>If a bus runs over
>>the editor, will the journal survive?  No... better still...  if the
>>editor's children need college tuition will it survive?
>
>We'll know in a year or so, since that's when I'm planning on handing
>on the baton... I personablly have little doubt JAIR will survive.
>It's become too successful to die easily.
>
>- Steve Minton
>  JAIR executive editor
>
>
>PS. In case it wasn't clear from the above, our current budget is
>exactly $0.  We receive no money other than the subisidies mentioned
>above (volunteer editing and servers). Well, perhaps I should mention
>that JAIR was started with a small grant to pay for legal help.
>
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 23 Jun 1995 12:59:26 EDT
Reply-To:     Mr C A Rusbridge 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Mr C A Rusbridge 
Subject:      Re: e-journals preservation
In-Reply-To:  <199506221622.AA100558170@casbah.acns.nwu.edu> from "Reginald
              Gibbons" at Jun 22, 95 04:38:00 pm
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Having read for many months the messages about the true costs of e-journals
> vs. printed ones, I am wondering if it wouldn't be reasonable to add to the
> estimated costs of e-journals the cost of maintaining the electronic data
> for *all* future generations.  Once the copy of the printed journal goes out
> to individual and institutional subscribers, the publisher's obligation to
> *preserve* the journal has been completely met, and is effectively
> transferred to libraries, at no cost whatsoever to the publisher of the
> journal.  What about the implied costs of e-journals which the publisher has
> to maintain in digital form forever, as perhaps the only central location
> with a complete "copy" of the journal?  Any thoughts about this archival
> value of a journal and the cost thereof to the electronic publisher?
 
Very long term preservation is a serious problem which we have to tackle,
although I don't necessarily draw the same conclusion. Since we do not
have publishers with guaranteed very long term viability, we must carry
out preservation some other way. It may be that libraries, deposit
libraries or national archives might have a role to play. However, just
as the long term cost of preserving paper journals is not factored into
the argument, neither should the long term cost of preserving the
electronic versions.
 
But this serious problem needs more discussion, thanks for raising it! I
hope the eLib programme will sponsor a workshop on this in the autumn in
the UK.
 
--
Chris Rusbridge
 
Programme Director, Electronic Libraries Programme
The Library, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
Phone 01203 524979      Fax 01203 524981
Email C.A.Rusbridge@Warwick.ac.uk
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Jun 1995 09:37:59 EDT
Reply-To:     gtill@ASNTSU.ASN.NET
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Dennis Putnam 
Subject:      Conversion Question
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
I am looking for a conversion program (DOS or Windows) that will convert a
Postscript file to some other format (DCA, RTF or word processor, e.g. Word,
Wordperfect, etc.). There seems to be plenty of programs to convert TO
Postscript but not FROM Postscript. Can anyone on this list help? If this
is the wrong list for this question I apologize and request that someone
point me in the right direction. Also please reply to me directly as I do
not subscribe to this list. Thanks in advance.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Dennis Putnam
Huntsville, AL
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 26 Jun 1995 15:02:20 EDT
Reply-To:     Steve Minton 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Steve Minton 
Subject:      e-journal budgets
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
In response to my message on ejournal budgets, Michael Boudreau wrote:
 
>> -- Low level editorial help: JAIR has no costs in this area. Computer
>>    scientists may be a bit odd, but they *like* to do their
>>    own formatting and they generally dislike having to work
>>    with copy editors who invariable *introduce* errors.
                                    ^
>And they also catch ones like this.
 
Good point. Since I seem to have struck a nerve, let me expand upon
what I was saying. Many of the errors that are introduced into paper
journals are a result of the typesetting process. With electronic
submissions fewer such errors will occur (for both paper and
electronic journals).  (I shouldn't have put the blame on copyeditors...)
 
>Of course what this means in practice varies from one person to another,
>but I think an argument can be made for aiming for a higher standard.  As
>the volume of information on the Internet increases, good copyediting and
>design will be as important as ever--if not more so--in making the
>mountains of text understandable as well as easy on the eyes.
>
>God help us all if everything we have to read is copy edited and formatted
>to the standards of computer scientists.
 
In my opinion, the formatting of JAIR does not differ significantly
from that of the paper journals I have edited.  The question of
whether a professional production staff is necessary is really a
question of cost/benefit. Each article in a technical journal such as
JAIR is read by a only very small number of people.  Even within AI,
an expert in one area, such as natural language understanding, will
generally ignore articles in another area, such as robotic manipulation.
There are some articles that are so important that they cross
boundaries, but in general, the intended audience (worldwide) for a
JAIR paper is *at most* a few hundred technical specialists. Is the
added cost of copy editing and professional formatting worth it for
such a small audience?
 
Lest this digress into a flame war, let me point out that I did have
a nice email exchange with Michael Boudreau, who wrote the excerpts above
(in response to my original message). He indicated that he wasn't referring
specifically to JAIR, but simply to a comment he's heard often from
non-designers, that their formatting attempts "are surely `good enough'
for readers", when in fact, "the results show that they haven't learned what
professional designers spent their own years in school learning".
 
I don't disagree with Mike. And I'd be very happy to have a copy editor and
a professional designer working on my staff.  But for JAIR, I doubt
whether the added cost would be worth the benefit. I think it depends
greatly on the nature of the publication.
 
Finally, I invite you to check out JAIR:
   http://www.cs.washington.edu/research/jair/home.html
 
- Steve Minton
  JAIR Executive editor
  Minton@ptolemy.arc.nasa.gov
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 27 Jun 1995 14:47:29 EDT
Reply-To:     David Stodolsky 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         David Stodolsky 
Organization: University of Copenhagen
Subject:      Re: e-journal budgets
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
In Regards to your letter <9506261809.AA04746@ptolemy.arc.nasa.gov>:
> Good point. Since I seem to have struck a nerve, let me expand upon
> what I was saying. Many of the errors that are introduced into paper
> journals are a result of the typesetting process. With electronic
> submissions fewer such errors will occur (for both paper and
 
It might be worth noting that once a paper is accepted for publication
there is a sudden loss of interest by the author in attending to details,
such as errors introduced in papers. Electronic submission does not
eliminate all problems, if there is any attempt at "reformatting". This
will often mangle elements such as tables and figures, introducing
major errors that can make the paper incomprehensible. Minor errors
can be fixed anytime in on-line publications, this sharply reduces
the justification for copy editors. Any reader can drop an email to
the author about minor errors. A good argument can be made that
unedited papers are actually more accurate, than those "fixed" by copy
editors, when we consider the motivational factors mentioned above.
 
 
dss
 
David S. Stodolsky      Euromath Center     University of Copenhagen
david@euromath.dk   Tel.: +45 38 33 03 30   Fax: +45 38 33 88 80 (C)
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 29 Jun 1995 13:21:54 EDT
Reply-To:     Stevan Harnad 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Stevan Harnad 
Subject:      Re: Publication dates
X-cc:         cogni-info@univ-lyon1.fr, cogni-publication@univ-lyon1.fr,
              echos@dmi.ens.fr
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> From: crusio%citi2.fr@Princeton.EDU (Wim Crusio)
> Date: Thu, 29 Jun 1995 12:12:53 +0200 (MET DST)
>
> Dear Stevan:
>
> This week I received a CNRS brochure concerning "Protection de la creation
> scientifique et technique et vulnerabilite de l'information".
>
> As the title says, the brochure offers some advice to CNRS researchers on
> how they can protect their intellectual property rights. One remark is
> especially pertinent to Psycoloquy:
>
> Prospective authors are admonished NOT to publish their results electronically
> before having a print version of their manuscript, because it would
> be impossible to establish the date of publication unequivocally with
> electronic publishing.
>
> I'm not sure whether this really is true, but it might be worth looking into.
>
> Best regards, Wim
>
> Dr. Wim E. Crusio
> Genetique, Neurogenetique et Comportement
> CNRS URA 1294
> 45, rue des Saints-Peres
> 75270 Paris Cedex 06                       Tel: (+) 33 1 4286 2206
> France                                     Fax: (+) 33 1 4286 2250
 
Ah Wim! What a complicated bit of nonsense the CNRS is propagating!
 
Si je n'etais pas si surmene, j'ecrirais tout ca en francais, mais
sous le poids de mes nombreuses obligations actuelles, je compte sur la
bienveillance d'autres pour bien vouloir traduire ce qui suit:
 
I wish I had the time to straighten this out definitively, because
otherwise a whole generation of innocent CNRS researchers will be
needlessly handicapped by this misguided directive. Here are the
relevant facts and logic:
 
(1) The CNRS directive does not distinguish between electronic journal
publication and electronic preprint publication, and I will consider the
cases separately, but the answer is the same for both: There is no
problem, either in principle or in practice, with electronic dating;
and the huge redundancy of the Internet provides many convergent
cross-checks on the validity of a date -- moreso than dated pieces of
paper!
 
(2) For electronic journals, the dating is identical to paper journals.
Each article in Psycoloquy is published on a calendar date, which
remains part of its citation archive in perpetuo, along with the volume
number and item number (no more need for issue numbers, for reasons that
should be obvious: articles can be published immediately after passing
peer review, acceptance, and editing. No need to wait to collect them
in an "issue" -- consisting usually of unrelated articles anyway).
 
(3) For electronic preprints, the situation is in principle the same --
and certainly no less temporally uncertain than for paper preprints
(does the CNRS advise its scientists against distributing paper
preprints and tech reports too?): The Ginsparg Physics preprint archive
at Los Alamos, for example, date-codes all submissions, and that too
becomes part of their record in perpetuo. If my Subversive Proposal
(vide infra) is followed and authors establish public electronic
preprint archives at their institutions for all their work, there is no
reason a similar (protected, coded, permanent) dating system cannot be
implemented for those archives too. To imagine otherwise is to have a
very limited grasp of the reality of electronic information (and paper
information too, by the way). Perhaps CNRS recommends that scientists
not reveal their results on radio or TV either, because of the
impossibility of establishing date information in nonprint media?
 
(4) But implicit in this nonsense is of course a much deeper piece of
nonsense, and, I suspect, the real motivation behind the CNRS directive,
which is that only the "print version" counts as a publication. But
there is a growing number of electronic-only journals that are
publishing articles whose only form is and will ever be electronic.
And, for once, the English are well ahead of the French on this score:
 
   [quoted from Journal of Glacial Geology and Geomorphology, an
   electronic-only journal]:
 
>  The Higher Education Funding Council (UK) states, with respect to
>  the next Research Assessment Exercise:
>
>  '....refereed journal articles published through electronic means
>  will be treated on the same basis as those appearing in printed
>  journals' .
 
So unless the CNRS's objective is to link the fate of its researchers
inextricably, sink or swim, with the current paper flotilla, I advise
them to undo this short-sighted directive at once, because the entire
literature is poised to take to the skies, sooner or later (and this
directive only tilts the balance a bit more in favor of later -- or at
least later for France).
 
A bibliography for some of the CNRS Directorate follows. Alas it is in
English, but there are some brilliant and eloquent spokesmen for this in
French too. Only last night I saw on French TV5 the redifussion of a
March programme featuring, among others, Jean-Claude Guedon of the
University of Montreal, a passionate and articulate advocate of
electronic publication as a new resource for reasserting the strength
of francophonie in science and scholarship.
 
----------------------------------------------------------------
    Stevan Harnad
    Professor of Psychology
    Director, Cognitive Sciences Centre
 
    Department of Psychology
    University of Southampton
    Highfield, Southampton
    SO17 1BJ UNITED KINGDOM
 
    harnad@ecs.soton.ac.uk     harnad@princeton.edu
    phone: +44 1703 592582
    fax:   +44 1703 594597
--------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/
    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/
    ftp://cogsci.ecs.soton.ac.uk/pub/harnad/
    gopher://gopher.princeton.edu:70/11/.libraries/.pujournals
 
Garfield, E. (1991) Electronic journals and skywriting: A complementary
medium for scientific communication? Current Contents 45: 9-11,
November 11 1991
 
Garson, L.R. (in press) Investigations in Electronic Delivery of
Chemical Information. To appear in: Proceedings of the International
Conference on Refereed Electronic Journals: Toward a Consortium for
Networked Publications, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, October 1-2, 1993.
 
Ginsparg, P. (1994) First Steps Towards Electronic Research
Communication. Computers in Physics. (August, American Institute of
Physics).  8(4): 390-396.  http://xxx.lanl.gov/blurb/
 
Harnad, S. (1979) Creative disagreement. The Sciences 19: 18 - 20.
 
Harnad, S. (ed.) (1982) Peer commentary on peer review: A case study in
scientific quality control, New York: Cambridge University Press.
 
Harnad, S. (1984) Commentaries, opinions and the growth of scientific
knowledge. American Psychologist 39: 1497 - 1498.
 
Harnad, S. (1985) Rational disagreement in peer review. Science,
Technology and Human Values 10: 55 - 62.
 
Harnad, S. (1986) Policing the Paper Chase. (Review of S. Lock, A
difficult balance: Peer review in biomedical publication.)
Nature 322: 24 - 5.
 
Harnad, S. (1990) Scholarly Skywriting and the Prepublication Continuum
of Scientific Inquiry. Psychological Science 1: 342 - 343 (reprinted in
Current Contents 45: 9-13, November 11 1991).
ftp://princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Harnad/harnad90.skywriting
 
Harnad, S. (1991) Post-Gutenberg Galaxy: The Fourth Revolution in the
Means of Production of Knowledge. Public-Access Computer Systems Review
2 (1): 39 - 53 (also reprinted in PACS Annual Review Volume 2
1992; and in R. D. Mason (ed.) Computer Conferencing: The Last Word.
Beach Holme Publishers, 1992; and in: M. Strangelove & D. Kovacs: Directory of
Electronic Journals, Newsletters, and Academic Discussion Lists (A.
Okerson, ed), 2nd edition. Washington, DC, Association of Research
Libraries, Office of Scientific & Academic Publishing, 1992).
ftp://princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Harnad/harnad91.postgutenberg
 
Harnad, S. (1992) Interactive Publication: Extending the
American Physical Society's Discipline-Specific Model for Electronic
Publishing. Serials Review, Special Issue on Economics Models for
Electronic Publishing, pp. 58 - 61.
ftp://princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Harnad/harnad92.interactivpub
 
Harnad, S. (1995a) Electronic Scholarly Publication: Quo Vadis?
Serials Review 21(1) 70-72 (Reprinted in Managing Information
2(3) 1995)
 
Harnad, S. (1995b) PostGutenberg Galaxy Wars. Times Higher Education
Supplement, Multimedia, p. vi, May 12 1995
 
Harnad, S. (1995c) Universal FTP Archives for Esoteric Science and
Scholarship:  A Subversive Proposal. In: Ann Okerson & James O'Donnell
(Eds.) Scholarly Journals at the Crossroads; A Subversive Proposal for
Electronic Publishing. Washington, DC., Association of Research
Libraries, June 1995.
 
Hayes, P., Harnad, S., Perlis, D. & Block, N. (1992) Virtual Symposium
on Virtual Mind. Minds and Machines 2: 217-238.
ftp://princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Harnad/harnad92.virtualmind
 
Katz, W. (1991) The ten best magazines of 1990.
Library Journal 116: 48 - 51.
 
Odlyzko, A.M. (1995) Tragic loss or good riddance? The impending
demise of traditional scholarly journals, International Journal of
Human-Computer Studies (formerly International Journal of Man-Machine
Studies), to appear. Condensed version to appear in Notices of the
Amercan Mathematical Society, January 1995.
ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib/att/math/odlyzko/tragic.loss.Z
 
          PUBLICLY RETRIEVABLE FTP/HTTP ARCHIVES
        FOR ESOTERIC SCIENCE AND SCHOLARSHIP:
            A SUBVERSIVE PROPOSAL
 
            Stevan Harnad
            Cognitive Science Laboratory
            Princeton University
            Princeton NJ 08542
            harnad@princeton.edu
 
   esoteric   213 aj .es-*-'ter-ik
   LL [italic esotericus], fr. Gk [italic es{o-}terikos], fr. [italic
   es{o-}ter{o-}], compar. of [italic eis{o-}], [italic es{o-}] within,
   fr. [italic eis] into, fr. [italic en] in -- more at [mini IN]
   1 a  aj designed for or understood by the specially initiated alone
   1 b  aj of or relating to knowledge that is restricted to a small group
   2 a  aj limited to a small circle <~ pursuits>
   2 b  aj [mini PRIVATE], [mini CONFIDENTIAL] 
           esoterically 21313 av  -i-k(*-)l{e-}
 
ABSTRACT: We have heard many sanguine predictions about the demise of
paper publishing, but life is short and the inevitable day still seems
a long way off. This is a subversive proposal that could radically
hasten that day. It is applicable only to ESOTERIC (non-trade,
no-market) scientific and scholarly publication (but that is the lion's
share of the academic corpus anyway), namely, that body of work for
which the author does not and never has expected to SELL his words. He
wants only to PUBLISH them, that is, to reach the eyes and minds of his
peers, his fellow esoteric scientists and scholars the world over, so
that they can build on one another's contributions in that cumulative.
collaborative enterprise called learned inquiry. For centuries, it was
only out of reluctant necessity that authors of esoteric publications
entered into the Faustian bargain of allowing a price-tag to be erected
as a barrier between their work and its (tiny) intended readership, for
that was the only way they could make their work public at all during
the age when paper publication (and its substantial real expenses) was
their only option. But today there is another way, and that is PUBLIC
FTP/HTTP: If every esoteric author in the world this very day
established a globally accessible local ftp archive for every piece of
esoteric writing he did henceforward, the long-heralded transition from
paper publication to purely electronic publication (of esoteric
research) would follow suit almost immediately. This is already
beginning to happen in the physics community, thanks to Paul Ginsparg's
HEP preprint network, with 25,000 users worldwide and 45,000 "hits" per
day, and Paul Southworth's CICnet is ready to help follow suit in other
disciplines. The only two factors standing in the way of this outcome
at this moment are (1) quality control (i.e., peer review and editing),
which today happens to be implemented almost exclusively by paper
publishers, and (2) the patina of paper publishing, which results from
this monopoly on quality control. If all scholars' preprints were
universally available to all scholars by anonymous ftp (and gopher, and
World-Wide Web, and the search/retrieval wonders of the future), NO
scholar would ever consent to WITHDRAW any preprint of his from the
public eye after the refereed version was accepted for paper
"PUBLICation." Instead, everyone would, quite naturally, substitute the
refereed, published reprint for the unrefereed preprint. Paper
publishers will then either restructure themselves (with the
cooperation of the scholarly community) so as to arrange for the
much-reduced electronic-only page costs (which I estimate to be less
than 25% of paper-page costs, contrary to the 75% figure that appears
in most current publishers' estimates) to be paid out of advance
subsidies (from authors' page charges, learned society dues, university
publication budgets and/or governmental publication subsidies) or they
will have to watch as the peer community spawns a brand new generation
of electronic-only publishers who will. The subversion will be
complete, because the (esoteric -- no-market) peer-reviewed literature
will have taken to the airwaves, where it always belonged, and those
airwaves will be free (to the benefit of us all) because their true
minimal expenses will be covered the optimal way for the unimpeded flow
of esoteric knowledge to all: In advance.
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 29 Jun 1995 13:23:26 EDT
Reply-To:     Craig Mulder <20676cam@msu.edu>
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Craig Mulder <20676cam@msu.edu>
Subject:      Summary of ACRL Discussion Group on Electronic Library Development
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
The ACRL Discussion Group on Electronic Library Development in Academic
Libraries met in Chicago and discussed the following topics:
 
There are many projects developing prototypes of the digital library and
these projects are the subject of several programs at ALA.  How do these
projects relate to your needs?  Do they address the questions you have?
What are those questions?
 
The goal was to provide a structure participants could use in evaluating
and reviewing reports of the various digital library projects and to
consider how those project were relevant to their own needs.
 
Over 30 participants divided into three groups to discuss this topic and
compile a list of questions.  Each group reported back to the larger group.
Here are the reports from each group.
 
 
Group 1
 
What is the library's role in providing digitized resources?  Should it
provide access only or should it be seen as a publisher of information.  If
the latter, how should this activity be financed-via cost recovery or pay
per view or some other option.  What is the impact of different cost models
on user behavior.
 
What is the importance of the digital library?
        -Will it save money?
        -Will it increase access?
        -Will it maintain an archival role by housing older materials
         which have been dropped by commercial publishers?
Are any of these more important than the others?
 
 
Group 2
 
-Who is the audience to which the digital library is directed?  What are
 their needs?  What is the digital library supposed to accomplish?
-What are the hardware requirements for a digital library?
-What are the standards needed for a digital library?  Which standards
 still need to be developed?
-What kind of training and support for users will be needed with the
 digital library?
-How should materials be selected for digitization?  Are their
 censorship implications related to such selection?
-What are the copyright issues?
-What are the models for licensing digital resources?
-How should the digital library be presented to users?  What are the
 user interface issues?  How important is uniformity of interfaces?
-What are the issues related to archival digital resources?
-How important is it to limit redundancy of digital resources?  How can
 that be done?
-What is a digital library?
-How can digital libraries be funded?
 
 
Group 3
 
What are the standards and models for access and retention?
 
What is the role of the public services staff in providing mediated access
to and searching of electronic resources?  How will this role change as the
digital library develops?
 
What responsibilities should libraries assume for archiving of digital
resources?
 
What standards are their for bibliographic control of digital resources?
 
How should we point users accustomed to print-based resources such as
journals, books, and indexes to their digital equivalents?
 
 
 
___________________________________________________________
Craig Mulder, Human Health Sciences Librarian
20676cam@msu.edu         | A217D East Fee Hall
517/432-3819             | Michigan State University
Fax: 517/353-8926        | East Lansing, MI  48824-1316
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Jun 1995 10:49:44 EDT
Reply-To:     Joanne Simpson 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Joanne Simpson 
Subject:      Please discontinue subscription
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
Dear Editors of VPI-EJ: The American Meteorological Society, jointly with four
other professional societies in the Earth sciences are well on their way to
starting on an all Electronic journal called Earth Interactions. I am in
the processing of handing over any responsibility I had for this journal in
its planning stages to others, and therefore wish to discontinue my
subscription to VPI-EJ at this time. I think it likely that the people who
are now in charge of electronic publishing in our Society will wish to
continue or begin subscribing. These people are Dr. Keith Seitter, AMS
publications Director, email address: kseitter@ametsoc.org (already
subscribes, I think)
Chief Editor: Dr. Eric Barron, email address: barron@essc.psu.edu
Chair of Information Systems Committee: Dr. Joseph Klemp, email address
klemp@nacar.ucar.edu
I have enjoyed VPI-EJ very much and learned a great deal of important
information from it. I hope to sign up again in the future when my work and
email load have diminished somewhat from their present overloaded
condition. Thanks alot and best wishes, Joanne
Simpson
 
*****************************************************************
** Joanne Simpson
Phone:          (301) 286-8569
** Chief Scientist for Meteorology
       Earth Sciences Directorate
        Mail Code 912
FAX:            (301) 286-1762
** NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
** Greenbelt, MD  20771
**TRMM Project Scientist
** E-Mail:     simpson@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov
** ********************************************************
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Jun 1995 10:50:57 EDT
Reply-To:     david@arch.ping.dk
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         David Stodolsky 
Organization: University of Copenhagen
Subject:      Re: Publication dates
X-cc:         crusio@citi2.fr, cogni-info@univ-lyon1.fr,
              cogni-publication@univ-lyon1.fr, echos@dmi.ens.fr,
              vpiej-l%VTVM1.BITNET@SEGATE.SUNET.SE
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
From: david@arch.ping.dk (David Stodolsky)
To: harnad@ecs.soton.ac.uk
Subject: Re: Publication dates
Date: Thu, 29 Jun 95 20:31:41 +0200 (CET DST)
CC: crusio@citi2.fr, cogni-info@univ-lyon1.fr,
Reply-To: david@arch.ping.dk (David Stodolsky)
 
 
In Regards to your letter <16072.9506291418@cogsci>:
>
> > From: crusio%citi2.fr@Princeton.EDU (Wim Crusio)
> > Date: Thu, 29 Jun 1995 12:12:53 +0200 (MET DST)
> >
[snip]
> > Prospective authors are admonished NOT to publish their results
 electronically
> > before having a print version of their manuscript, because it would
> > be impossible to establish the date of publication unequivocally with
> > electronic publishing.
[snip]
>
> (2) For electronic journals, the dating is identical to paper journals.
> Each article in Psycoloquy is published on a calendar date, which
> remains part of its citation archive in perpetuo, along with the volume
> number and item number (no more need for issue numbers, for reasons that
> should be obvious: articles can be published immediately after passing
> peer review, acceptance, and editing. No need to wait to collect them
> in an "issue" -- consisting usually of unrelated articles anyway).
>
 
For those would don't feel anyone can be trusted to guard their
publication date, the good news is that easily available cryptographic
protocols yield security unreachable with paper documents. See:
Bruce Schneier's  book _Applied Cryptography_.
 
The following review of APPLIED CRYPTOGRAPHY appeared in the
January 1994 issue of Cryptologia (v. 18, n. 1).  Written by
Louis Kruh.
 
     The past twenty years have seen an explosive growth in
     public research into cryptology, accompanied by an
     unprecedented public awareness of matters cryptologic.
     Programmers and engineers trying to benefit from the fruits
     of this research, to solve real-world problems, have often
     been stymied by not knowing where to start looking, let
     alone when to stop.  This book is for them.  Written as a
     "comprehensive reference work for modern cryptology" the
     book succeeds both as an encyclopedia survey of the past
     twenty hears of public research and as a hansom "how-to"
     cookbook of the state-of-the-art.  It could well have been
     subtitled "The Joy of Encrypting."
 
     The author's style is colloquial and informal, but never
     imprecise.  Theory takes a back seat to clarity and
     directness, without deliberate misrepresentation; unabashed
     informed opinion wins out over academic hesitations.  Since
     the work is a practical snapshot of the field, circa mid-to-
     late 1993, several of the book's recommendations may prove
     timely: new results seem to be reported monthly.  While his
     political axe is never concealed the book is written as a
     whetstone for others rather than a soapbox rant, and the
     focus is manifestly practical solutions and the tools with
     which to achieve them.
 
     After a forward from Whitfield Diffie the author explains
     foundations; examined protocols; discusses techniques;
     presents algorithms; explores the real world (including
     legal and political aspects); and finishes up by printing
     read-to-run C source code programs of several of the
     algorithms, including ENIGMA, DES and IDEA.  Reflecting the
     confused nature of the real world, a set of IBM PC disks
     containing the sources published in the book is available
     from the author--but only to residents of the USA and
     Canada.  Drawing on 908 references and the collected
     experience of contributors throughout the Internet and
     around the world, this book will be a useful addition to the
     library of any active or would be security practitioner.
 
---------------------
 
 
David S. Stodolsky      Euromath Center     University of Copenhagen
david@euromath.dk   Tel.: +45 38 33 03 30   Fax: +45 38 33 88 80 (C)
 
David S. Stodolsky      Euromath Center     University of Copenhagen
david@euromath.dk   Tel.: +45 38 33 03 30   Fax: +45 38 33 88 80 (C)
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 30 Jun 1995 10:55:15 EDT
Reply-To:     Melissa Wilson Obenhaus 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Melissa Wilson Obenhaus 
Subject:      List unattended
 
VPIEJ-L will be unattended from noon today (Friday, June 30) until 8 a.m.
Wednesday, July 5. Messages submitted for posting will be held in queue until
that time.....
 
.......Melissa Wilson Obenhaus