VPIEJ-L Discussion Archives

July 1995

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Date:         Thu, 6 Jul 1995 12:16:01 EDT
Reply-To:     James Powell 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         James Powell 
Subject:      Re: List Unattended
 
Please resubmit any postings you may have sent within the last 1-2 days.  An
item or two might have escaped us during the holidays.  Sorry for the
inconvenience.
 
James (who underestimated the power of jetlag).
 
James Powell ... Library Automation, University Libraries, VPI&SU
1-4986       ... JPOWELL@VTVM1.CC.VT.EDU
             ... jpowell@scholar.lib.vt.edu
             ... Owner of VPIEJ-L, a discussion list for Electronic Journals
Archives: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/   gopher://scholar.lib.vt.edu/
          ftp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/pub/
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 10 Jul 1995 10:58:17 EDT
Reply-To:     owner-newjour@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         owner-newjour@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
Subject:      Desktop Publishing
 
Forwarded message:
Date: Thu, 6 Jul 1995 11:45:22 -0400 (EDT)
From: Directory of E-Journals 
Subject: Desktop Publishing
 
 
http://www.demon.co.uk/cyber/dp/dp.html
 
[A magazine for prepress and design professionals]
 
[Issues can be browsed online via WWW, or downloaded in .pdf (Adobe
Acrobat) and enhanced text formats]
 
[Current Feature Articles]
 
Operating Systems - Andy Hornsby gives an overview
Grid Expectations - The importance of the grid and its recent development
Print Futures - Is ink and paper publishing doomed?
Scanner Selection - Andy Hornsby on compromises that must be faced
Image enhancement - How to put life into pictures that fall below par
Points and picas - Why traditional measurements have their place
 
webweaver@greened.demon.co.uk
 
 
Peter Graham    psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu    Rutgers University Libraries
169 College Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08903   (908)445-5908; fax (908)445-5888
              
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Date:         Mon, 10 Jul 1995 10:58:50 EDT
Reply-To:     Kevin Ward 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Kevin Ward 
Subject:      Re: e-journal budgets
In-Reply-To:  <01050105.1bbj11@arch.ping.dk>
 
 
On Tue, 27 Jun 1995, David Stodolsky wrote:
 
> A good argument can be made that unedited papers are actually more
> accurate, than those "fixed" by copy editors
 
From my point of view, a good argument as such cannot be made.  While
there may be evidence of editor-corruption of manuscripts, it is also
quite common that the authors introduce a good deal of inaccuracy
themselves.  My example is of citations and lists of
references/bibliography.  My preliminary research has shown to me that in
examination of 26 unedited manuscripts (submitted for a print journal),
authors have:
 
        - given the wrong year of citation: 13 times
        - given incomplete or altogether wrong pages: 24
        - misspelled or omitted words from title: 19
        - omitted reference for material cited in text: 13
        - incorrect WWW address: 7
 
There have even been two instances where the author has given the wrong
journal name!  Of course, none of these brief statistics consider errors
within the text: misquotes (which include statistics and numerical data),
erroneous page numbers, inconsistancies between the cite and the
reference, etc.
 
Since a useful way to pursue relevant literature is to peruse
references/footnotes, such errors can prohibit or significantly delay a
researchers' search for material.
 
While editors must remember their responsibility to the author and reader
by maintaining the content of the original manuscript, if authors
self-publish, shouldn't they also be aware of their same responsibility?
 
                        Kevin
 
                                    /\
 
                                Kevin Ward
                      Library and Information Science
                <          University of Illinois         >
                          ward@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu
                      http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~ward
 
                                    \/
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 10 Jul 1995 10:59:08 EDT
Reply-To:     ABRAHAMS SHERRY L 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         ABRAHAMS SHERRY L 
Subject:      Electronic holdings
 
        We own some publications that are now available only, or also, on
electronic databases.  We are uncertain about how to direct our users
to these items and databases.  Some possibilities are putting the
electronic address (which is subject to change) in the call number, or
in a note on the catalog record.
        How does your library handle such items?       - Sherry Abrahams
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 10 Jul 1995 10:59:28 EDT
Reply-To:     Ann Okerson 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Ann Okerson 
Subject:      1995 Listings of E-Serials Available Online
 
 
This message is cross-posted to several relevant lists.
------------------------------------------------------
 
 
The Office of Scientific & Academic Publishing of the Association
of Research Libraries is happy to announce the availaiblity of two
resources of interest to Internet users:
 
_____________________________________________________________________
DIRECTORY OF ELECTRONIC JOURNALS, NEWSLETTERS, AND ACADEMIC DICUSSION
LISTS, 5th Edition, May 1995  (GOPHER EDITION)
 
An abridged version of this resource is available on the ARL gopher
as of June 30th, 1995.  The URL is:
 
gopher://arl.cni.org:70/11/scomm/edir
 
Here is the path to the gopher version:
 
yourprompt> gopher arl.cni.org
                Scholarly Communication
                        Directory of Electronic ...
                                1995 ...
 
This version contains a significant subset from the full database
version available via the printed edition, including: Introduction,
Foreword, a link to Charles Bailey's E-Publishing Bibliography, and the
Titles/Descriptions/Contact information for nearly 700 Internet serials
and 2500 discussion lists.
 
The journal and newsletter entries were compiled by Lisabeth King,
Research Assistant at ARL; the gopher version was compiled by Douglas
Lay, Research Assistant at ARL.  The e-lists are coordinated and
maintained by Diane K. Kovacs and Team, Kent State University.  The
resource was made available on the ARL server by Dru Mogge, Electronic
Services Coordinator.
 
For those of you who link to our resource, the 1994 files have now
been dropped and your links to us may no longer work.  Please update
them, and if you have questions, please contact Dru Mogge (dru@cni.org)
 
For electronic information about the printed edition and how to order
it, please contact: osap@cni.org
 
Phone:  202-296-2296;  Fax:  202-872-0884
Ask for Patricia Brennan, Communications Services Coordinator
________________________________________________________________________
 
NewJour Announcement List
 
NewJour is an electronic announcement list that updates the ARL
Directory of Electronic Journals and Newsletters between its annual,
formal printed and networked editions.  As of June 1995, it has 2,000
subscribers from all seven continents and posts on average ten new
networked serials per day.  "New" titles are either brand new creations
or titles that are newly discovered for the ARL database of e-serials.
 
NewJour welcomes your interest and announcements and hopes to offer
enhanced services before the end of 1995.
 
To subscribe to NewJour, send a message to:
 
        majordomo@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
 
Leave the subject line blank and in the body of the message type:
 
        subscribe NewJour
 
Direct postings of new serials should be directed to:
 
        NewJour@ccat.sas.upenn.edu
 
NewJour was created in Summer 1993 and and provides a place for creators
of new electronic journals to report their plans and announcements to
potential subscribers.  It is also updated by postings from the ARL
staff as they routinely discover new Internet serial titles (journals,
newsletters, magazines, zines, and other formats).
 
This electronic conference began on server space provided by the
American Mathematical Society.  In January of 1995 it relocated to a
site offered at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Computer
Analysis of Texts, a group that offered service and support for
our growing enterprise.
 
The complete set of backfiles of NewJour postings is updated daily
It is a fully searchable archive and can be found at:
 
        gopher://ccat.sas.upenn.edu:5070/11/journals/newjour
 
The list is co-moderated by:
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
James O'Donnell/Professor of Classics, University of Pennsylvania
 
 
Happy Serial Cyber-Hunting to you all,
 
Ann Okerson/Association of Research Libraries
Washington, DC
ann@cni.org
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Date:         Mon, 10 Jul 1995 10:59:45 EDT
Reply-To:     "Efthimis N. Efthimiadis" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Efthimis N. Efthimiadis" 
Subject:      FUN and VUSE: IR system presentations at UCLA
 
           The Dept. of Library & Information Science,
     Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, UCLA,
                         and
  the Student Chapter of the American Society for Information Science
                invite you to two presentations:
 
a) The VUSE (View-based User Search Engine) system for INSPEC
        by Dr Martin Smith
 
b) FUN : An NF2 Relational Interface with Aggregation
      Capability for Document Retrieval, Restructuring and Analysis
        by Dr Kalervo Jarvelin
 
DATE:     Thursday July 6, 1995
TIME:     3-4pm and 4-5pm
VENUE:    Room 121, GSE&IS Bldg, UCLA
PARKING:  UCLA parking available at $5 (request lot #5 or #3)
 
Reception with refreshments and cookies is provided by
the UCLA Student Chapter of ASIS.
 
 
Abstracts of the two systems follow:
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
a) The VUSE (View-based User Search Engine) system for INSPEC
        presented by Dr Martin Smith
 
Abstract
CeDAR - The Centre for Database Access Research, School of Computing
and Mathematics, University of Huddersfield, UK, has pioneered the
use of view-based techniques to improve the effectiveness of user-
interfaces to both bibliographic and corporate databases.
The system presented is:
 
VUSE for INSPEC
 
This front-ending software searches the 5 million record INSPEC
database and is a by-product of a research project launched on 1st
Sept. 1991.  The project has been funded by the University of
Huddersfield in collaboration with the Institution of Electrical
Engineers,  Marconi Research Laboratories and STN-International
(FIZ-Karlsruhe).  The  VUSE (View-based User Search Engine) system removes
the need for the user to appreciate explicit Boolean statements by
introducing a search strategy of successive refinement through the
use of filtering views.  These techniques are described in ``Peek-a-Boo
revived --- End-user searching of bibliographic databases using
filtering views.'' by A Steven Pollitt, Martin P Smith and Geoffrey P
Ellis, Online 94, 18th International Online Information Meeting,
London, December 1994 pp 63-72.
 
Contact:
CeDAR - Centre for Database Access Research,
School of Computing & Mathematics,
The University of Huddersfield,
Queensgate, Huddersfield  HD1 3DH, UK;
Tel: +44 (0)484 472248 or 472147,
Fax: +44 (0)484 421106,
Email: cedar@hud.ac.uk, a.s.pollitt@hud.ac.uk;
http://www.hud.ac.uk/schools/cedar/cedar.html
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
(B)
FUN : An NF2 Relational Interface with Aggregation
      Capability for Document Retrieval, Restructuring and Analysis
 
Kalervo Jarvelin and Timo Niemi
 
Abstract
 
Complex documents are used in many environments, e.g., information
retrieval (IR). Such documents contain subdocuments, which may contain
further subdocuments, etc. In practice, document database users often
want to view selected complex documents in different structures and to
obtain aggregation information on their subdocuments. Therefore powerful
tools are needed for complex document retrieval, restructuring, and
analysis. The FUN system provides powerful filter conditions, full
restructuring capability and multi-attribute multi-level data aggregation of
structured complex documents represented in the non-first-normal-form
(NF2) relational model. In particular, The FUN system provides these
capabilities in a truly declarative and powerful interface.
 
Contact:
 
Kalervo Jarvelin, principal investigator,
Dept. of Information Studies, University of Tampere,
P.O.Box 607, FIN-33101 TAMPERE, Finland;
Fax : +358 31 215 6560, Tel (home) : +358 31 317 1794,
Email : kalervo.jarvelin@uta.fi
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 11 Jul 1995 09:19:41 EDT
Reply-To:     psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Peter Graham,
              Rutgers University Libraries" 
Subject:      Electronic holdings:
 
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University Libraries
On 7/10 Sherry Abrahams said:
 
        We own some publications that are now available only, or also, on
electronic databases.  We are uncertain about how to direct our users
to these items and databases.  Some possibilities are putting the
electronic address (which is subject to change) in the call number, or
in a note on the catalog record.
        How does your library handle such items?       - Sherry Abrahams
 
***********************************************************************
This is a large issue being addressed on a number of fronts.  For starters I
would suggest that SA subscribe to PACS-L, a listserv which deals with these
issues among many others.
 
If SA's local catalog can do it, she may wish to consider using the
newly-defined Marc 856 field, especially the subfield $u for URLs.  --pg
 
Peter Graham    psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu    Rutgers University Libraries
169 College Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08903   (908)445-5908; fax (908)445-5888
              
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 11 Jul 1995 09:20:26 EDT
Reply-To:     David Stodolsky 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         David Stodolsky 
Organization: University of Copenhagen
Subject:      Re: e-journal budgets
 
 
In Regards to your letter
 :
> On Tue, 27 Jun 1995, David Stodolsky wrote:
>
> > A good argument can be made that unedited papers are actually more
> > accurate, than those "fixed" by copy editors
>
> From my point of view, a good argument as such cannot be made.  While
>[snip]
>
> While editors must remember their responsibility to the author and reader
> by maintaining the content of the original manuscript, if authors
> self-publish, shouldn't they also be aware of their same responsibility?
>
>                         Kevin
 
Yes, and with on-line documents, errors can be fixed as they are pointed
out to the author. Authors may be sloppy, but there are no institutionalized
sources of corruption as is the case with edited journals.
 
This issue was covered quite extensively and an extensive citation
list was provided on the Hyperjournal-forum List. My contribution:
 
======================================================================
From: david@arch.ping.dk (David Stodolsky)
To: hyperjournal-forum@mailbase.ac.uk
Subject: Re: Can internet publishing be life endangering?
Date: Fri, 30 Jun 95 12:47:50 +0200 (CET DST)
 
In Regards to your letter <9506291841.AA29649@wuecona.wustl.edu>:
> Excuse me but  just because a refereed journal publishes
> something don't make it right.  Generally it means that two to five other
> 'expert' humans have looked at the material and said "yes".  However, the
 
 
The performance of medical journals, on the average, is not very good.
The Dalkon Shield Intrauterine device was approved on the basis on
publication in a peer reviewed journal. Thousands of women were injured
by it, many became infertile, and some died. The sleeping drug, Halcion,
was widely distributed even though know to be dangerous. A judge in
Canada free a women who, after using it for a year, got out of bed
one night, and for no apparent reason, took a gun and murdered her own
mother, who was sleeping in the next room:
-----------------------------------------
   * Upjohn, for engaging in "an ongoing pattern of misconduct" to
ensure that its sleeping pill, Halcion, would remain on the market,
despite proof that long-term use of the drug induces memory loss,
depression, anxiety and violent behavior in some patients.
 
   The Multinational Monitor's "Ten Worst" list, now in its seventh
year, is designed to highlight the most egregious acts of corporate
crime, violence and other wrongdoing.
   The Multinational Monitor, founded by consumer advocate Ralph
Nader in 1980, is a monthly magazine that focuses on issues of
multinational corporate power.
-----------------------------------------------
 
If you want to laugh until you cry, check out:
Stewart, W. W. & Feder, N. (1987).
The integrity of the scientific literature. Nature, 325, 207-214.
 
They investigated a case of scientific fraud, where a student got
over 120 papers published in the medical journals in 3 years. They found
it remarkable that the review process had not detected cases where abstracts
did not agree with paper bodies, and where diagrams showed women who had
become mothers at the ages of 7 and 63. One of those journals responded
to investigators with a statement that they did not print retractions.
The field was cardiology. Try to avoid heart attacks ;-)
 
It is time to realize that paper journals represent the floor for
quality that is acceptable in the electronic world.
 
dss
 
 
====================================
More on this from:
Stodolsky, D. (1988, October). Scientific publication through electronic media.
Appendix to a research proposal, Selekterende elektronisk publikation,
submitted to the Danish Natural Sciences Research Council. [Revised
1990]
-------------------------------------
 
 
I like the sound of anything that will help improve the peer review process.
This is something particularly important to me today, since I just received
three reviews of a paper we submitted and they are all completely absurd. I
 don't
know what paper they read, but it wasn't ours. It would be great if there were
 [sic]
some way for us to respond, but the editor just assumes the reviewers are
experts (clearly not true here). There's simply no official way to debate
the issues, even to counter blatant factual errors, in such reviews. I hope
your approach would [sic] address this problem. (Anonymous, personal
 communication,
October 3, 1988)
 
The editor said that we do not reject papers from Bell Labs.
(Anonymous, personal communication, January 2, 1989)
 
 
 
Scientific Publication through Electronic Media
 
 
Electronic media have created new possibilities for the
distribution of scientific information. One major result has
been an increase in the number of information sources for
scientific workers, including electronic mail and computer
conferences. A second has been a change in the nature of
message units published. The basic message unit in advanced
systems is a multi-media document. This document can include
text, voice, moving pictures, graphs, spreadsheet files, and
executable programs.
 
2.      Problem statement
 
A key problem with such complex documents is that they cannot
easily be evaluated by scanning. A text document can be
scanned, and key words can be indexed for easy access. However,
a voice document, for example, is more or less opaque; it must
be listened to from the start to be evaluated effectively.
 
Both the increase in number of channels and the opacity of new
document types has led to a greater need for evaluation of
documents. Unfortunately, the new channels are inferior to
conventional journals in terms of evaluation because of the
lack of effective peer review.
 
2.1.    Potential of Telematics
 
The immediacy and flexibility of the new channels, however,
permit new modes of peer review that are superior to those used
currently. An improvement in both the quality and the intensity
of peer evaluation can be achieved. By quality we mean the
independence of judgement and the attention devoted to
evaluation by a referee. By intensity we mean the number of
people giving evaluations of a message and the number of types
of evaluations which can be given. Furthermore, the new
technology can effectively support evaluation of smaller
documents, thereby substantially increasing the intensity of
evaluation per unit of text. To achieve these objectives both
the social relations surrounding peer review and the nature of
review activity must be restructured.
 
2.2.    Objectives
 
The overall objective of this paper is to describe a system for
peer review of scientific contributions mediated by computers
that communicate via data transmission networks. This
description specifies security procedures designed to ensure
independence of judgement among referees. It also specifies a
system for message evaluation designed to increase the
intensity of review. Security is provided by a
cryptographically-based pseudonym system. The system includes
an independent registrar that supports secure name generation.
The message evaluation system includes a procedure for
collecting evaluations and a program that uses evaluations to
prioritize messages waiting to be read by each referee. The
evaluations can be used to support two approaches to peer
review. The first, a personal approach, permits a referee to
specify selection of messages based upon the reputations of the
author(s) and of the referee(s) who have previously given
evaluations of a message. The second, a community approach,
selects messages for publication by a statistical estimation
method that identifies adequate agreement about the quality of
messages among a subset of referees.
 
4.      Background
 
Science has been characterised as public knowledge that is
established through concensus formation in each field (Ziman,
cited in Kronick, 1978). Hogben (cited in Kronick, 1978)
argues, however, that the scope of modern science requires much
of it to be taken on trust, leading more and more to a new
authoritarianism. If such a new authoritarianism is to be
avoided, the formation of consensus must be balanced by its
subversion (Kronick, 1978). Scientific communities, however,
appear to be quite resistant to change once a concensus has
been established.
 
Futhermore, many aspects of the scientific communication system
tend to reduce the degree to which new knowlege is actually
public.
 
4.1.    Scientific Publication - Current status
 
Storer (1966) has argued that without adequate theoretical
structure in a scientific community tendencies toward fraud and
factionalism become strong. The expansion in the number of
working scientists producing data and the lack of "room at the
top" for many theorists are cited as sources for inadequate
integration of different fields. He argues that this trend can
be countered by "something new, such as the increasingly
promising General Systems Theory, that will provide a new basis
for the integration of the entire scientific community (Storer,
1966, p.147) " Bibliometric ananlysis has show that "complex
systems" do form an integrative function in science (), but it
does not appear that the support for General Systems research
has been adequate to cope with the situation. The level of
fraud and misconduct is now such a that "if the scientific
community doesn't police itself, the government will
(Powledge, 1988, p. 6)."
 
4.1.1.  Biases
 
Wright (1970; 402) argues "The risks of abuses in the way in
which scientific papers are refereed is so great that referees
should be required to send signed copies of their reports to
authors." He cites several ways referees can take advantage of
their anonymity in undermining a competitor. They can recommend
rejection of the paper, recommend extensive revision, or claim
they have lost the copy, thereby gaining time to publish their
own competing results first. He cites examples of careless and
irresponsible behavior of referees from his own and other
peoples' experiences. In one case in which a referee delayed
publication of a paper for over a year, during which time he
published his own competing paper, "six psycho-political
manoeuvres" were used to get the general editor on his side.
He also explains how he identified the anonymous referees in
order to justify his remarks. Wright (1970; 403) further
states, "There can be no doubt that editorial bodies of some
scientific journals are more or less frequently irresponsible."
Irresponsible behavior creates a bias against innovative work,
since that work poses the greatest threat to those in power.
 
4.1.1.1.        Inefficiencies
 
Size of publication. Hodgkin (cited in Katzen, 1986) points
out that "one of the ways in which the electronic form may
influence the content of electronic journals is that there may
be a simultaneous push toward longer and shorter papers. The
economics of the printed journal favours communications of more
than five hundred but fewer than ten thousand words. The
economics of the network and the format of the screen will
probably encourage very short summaries or abstracts while also
permitting the dumping of large listings, tables, datasets, etc.,
which may be largely hidden from the browsing reader. (p. 15)."
 
4.1.1.1.1.      Delays
 
While the reading time of referees has often been cited as the
source of delays in scientific publication, administrative
processing can be responsible for major delays, especially with
smaller or less organized journals. Schwartz and Dubin (1978)
give an example of improvements in total processing time by
almost one-half as a result of changes in the way papers were
handled after they were returned by referees.
 
Secrecy
 
There is a good deal of evidence that the larger (scientific)
community is spit by deliberate efforts at secrecy, especially
in the highly active and competitive areas (Hagstrom,1967:
Gaston, 1970; Cited in Collins, 1975, p. 507)
 
4.1.1.1.2.      Error control
 
Geiger (1986) argues that the indirect consequences of the
introduction of electronics into the dissemination of
scientific information include the cutting in stages of peer
review and editing, with an associated reduction in quality of
information disseminated. His arguement is related to downward
pressure on prices for journal induced by increasing purchases
of electronic services.
 
However, a sharp increase (more than a doubling in three years
in at least one case) in prices of the highest quality journals
has been noted recently (Lee, 1989). "Increases are due to
publisher's desire to generate large profits.... Publishers are
well aware of the impetus behind the scholarly community's
drive to publish. They use this to their own advantage by
hiring respected scholars to serve on editorial boards and on
committees to determine which articles will be selected for
publication.(Lee, 1989, p. 2-3)."
 
4.1.1.2.        Rejection of Innovation
 
"Ordinary scientists consistently fight against or ignore the
truly innovative.... Something must be wrong ... there are
virtually no diseases for which one is likely to be better off
receiving the best 1981 rather than the best 1951 medical care.
(Horrobin, 1982)"
 
"It is well known that people with innovative, creative ideas
departing from common dogma do not get funded by NIH or NSF,
and those having ideas that depart from common dogma are
castigated and reviled, and their papers are rejected by peer
review (Paque, 1988)."
 
"Reviewing's real function is what is does successfully, to
deny innovators direct access to publication.... As the guilds
controlled progress in the middle ages, so scientific and
technical establishments slow the pace of change to a rate they
can accommodate to. Reviewing is part of the mechnanism for
doing this.... The establishment gives referees great power
over other peoples' lives. The referees repay the establishment
by suppressing new discoveries (McCutchen, 1976)."
 
These anecdotes are supported by quantitative studies. "Data
even less flattering to referees have emerged from a study of
highly cited chemistry papers. This showed a significant
negative correlation between referees' evaluations of papers
and the number of citations the papers subsequently received--
highly cited papers generally received lower referees'
evaluations than papers that were cited less frequently
(Gordon, 1977)."
 
4.1.1.2.1.      Delays: Contact between intellectual communities
 
Major innovations occur where intellectual communities with
independent bases come into contact (Collins, 1975, p.519)
 
 
4.1.1.2.2.      Rich get richer
 
There is considerable resistance to new techniques and technologies
among powerful, established scientists. And these scientists use the
shield of anonymity to block publication of innovative new experiments
(Wiley, cited in Dalton, 1988).
 
[snip]
 
7.      [Extended] References
 
 
Astley, W. G. (1985). Administrative science as socially
constructed truth. Administrative Science Quarterly, 30, 497-
513.
 
Batchelder, W. H. & Romney, A. K. (1988). Test theory without
an answer key. Psychometrika, 53(1), 71-92.
 
Chaum, D. (1985). Security without identification: Transaction
systems to make big brother obsolete. Communications of the
ACM, 28(10), 1030-1044.
 
Christensson, J. A. & Sigelman, L. (1987, Sept. 21).
Accrediting knowledge: Journal stature and citation impact in
social science. Current Contents - Social and Behavioral
Sciences, 19(38), 5-11. Reprinted from Social Science
Quarterly, 1985, 66(4).
 
Collins, R. (1975). Conflict Sociology. New York: Academic.
 
Dalton, R. (1988, July 11). The Scientist, 2(13), pp. 5; 10.
 
Dehmer, P. (1982). APS reviews refereeing procedures. Physics
Today, 35(2), 9; 95-97.
 
Dodd, P. Pullinger, D. Tuck, B. & Archer, D. (1987).
Information exchange in the research community: An introduction
to the Quartet project. The second Guelph symposium on computer
conferencing, (pp. 307-322). Ontario, Canada: Guelph University,
Department of Rural Extension Studies.
 
EXPRES Newsletter (1987). 1(1).
 
Fox, E. (1981). Implementing SMART for minicomputers via
relational processing with abstract data types. Sigsmall
Newsletter, 7(2), 119-129.
 
Garfield, E. (1986a, August 4). Refereeing and peer review.
Part 1. Opinion and conjecture on the effectiveness of
refereeing. Current Contents, pp. 3-11.
 
Garfield, E. (1986b, August 11). Refereeing and peer review.
Part 2. The research on refereeing and alternatives to the
present system. Current Contents, pp. 3-12.
 
Geiger, S. R. (1986). Electronics in publishing and the
consequences. Scholarly Publishing, 18, 29-31.
 
Gordon, M. (1977). Evaluating the evaluators. New Scientist,
77, 342-343.
 
Gordon, M. (1983). Running a refereeing system. Leicester, UK:
Primary Communication Centre, University of Leicester.
 
Gregory, C. A. (1982). Gifts and Commodities. London: Academic.
 
Harnad, S. (1979). Creative disagreement. Sciences, 19(7), 18-
20.
 
Horrobin, D. F. (1982). Peer Review: A philosophically faulty
concept which is proving disasterous for science. In S. Harnad
(Ed.). Peer commentary of peer review (pp. 33-34). Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press. (Reprinted from Brain and
Behavioral Sciences, 1982, 5)
 
Karabenick, S. A. (1987). Computer conferencing: Its impact on
academic help-seeking. The second Guelph symposium on computer
conferencing, (pp. 69-76). Ontario, Canada: Guelph University,
Department of Rural Extension Studies.
 
Katzen, M. (1986). Electronic publishing in the humanities.
Scholarly Publishing, 18, 5-16.
 
Kronick, D. A. (1978). Authorship and authority in the
scientific periodicals of the seventeenth and eighteenth
centuries. Library Quarterly, 48, 255-275.
 
Lee, R. (1989), February). University Affairs, 30(2), 2-3.
 
Lindsey, D. (1978). The scientific publication system in social
science. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
 
Lloyd, D. (1985). Online Magazines on Compuserve. Online Today,
4(2), 30-31.
 
Michel, F. C. (1982). Solving the problem of refereeing.
Physics Today, 35(12), 9; 82.
 
McCutchen, C. (1976, 29 April). An evolved conspiracy. New
Scientist, 70(998), 225.
 
Paque, R. P. (1988, October 17). End peer review [Letters]. The
Scientist, p. 10.
 
Palme, J. (1984). Survey of computer-based message systems.
Proceedings of the first IFIP conference on "Human-computer
interaction" (Vol. 1). Amsterdam: Elsevier Science.
 
Powledge, T. M. (1988 November 4). Getting serious about fraud
& misconduct. AAAS Observer, (2), pp. 1; 6-7 [Supplement to
Science].
 
Prizes like the Nobel are unjust - And bad for science. (1988,
October 17). The Scientist, p. 9.
 
Reid, B. K. (1988). The USENET Cookbook - an experiment in
electronic publishing. Electronic Publishing - Origination,
Dissemination and Design, 1(1), 55-76.
 
Romney, A. K. , Weller, S. C. & Batchelder, W. H. (1986).
Culture as consensus: A theory of culture and informant
accuracy. American Anthropologist, 88(2), 313-338.
 
Romney, A. K. , Weller, S. C. & Batchelder, W. H. (1987).
Recent applications of cultural concensus Theory. American
Behavioral Scientist, 31(2), 163-177.
 
Schwartz, B. & Dubin, S. C. (1978). Manuscript queues and
editorial organization. Scholarly Publishing, 9, 253-259.
 
Shackel, B. Pullinger, D. J. Dodd, W. P Maude, T. I. (1983).
The BLEND-LINC project on 'electronic journals' after two years.
Computer Journal, 26(30), 247-254.
 
Small, H. (1987, December 21-28). Report on citation analysis
research at ISI. Current Contents, (51-52), 4-8.
 
Snyder, L. (1985). There are problems with the review process
[Viewpoint]. Communications of the ACM, 28(4), 349, 403.
 
Stewart, W. W. & Feder, N. (1987). The integrity of the
scientific literature. Nature, 325, 207-214.
 
Stodolsky, D. (1988a, August). Protecting expression in
teleconferencing: Pseudonym-based peer review journals. Paper
presented at the Fourteenth World Conference on Distance
Education, Oslo, Norway.
 
Stodolsky, D. (1988b, October). Scientific publication through
electronic media. Appendix to a research proposal, Selekterende
elektronisk publikation, submitted to the Danish Natural
Sciences Research Council.
 
Wilkerson, I. (1987, April 18). Ethnic jokes in campus computer
prompt debate. The New York Times.
 
Wright, R. D. (1970). Truth and its keepers. New Scientist, 45,
402-404).
===============================================================
 
 
David S. Stodolsky      Euromath Center     University of Copenhagen
david@euromath.dk   Tel.: +45 38 33 03 30   Fax: +45 38 33 88 80 (C)
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 11 Jul 1995 09:21:06 EDT
Reply-To:     Elliot Palais 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Elliot Palais 
Subject:      Re: e-journal budgets
In-Reply-To:  note of 07/10/95 07:59
 
Kevin Ward found a large number of inaccurate references in
unedited manuscripts submitted for publication in a journal.
Unfortunately, even published articles, which somehow passed
the review of copy-editors, frequently contain faulty references
(wrong volume numbers, wrong dates, etc). Among those who have
remarked on this poor record: Jacques Barzun (The Modern
Researcher), who wrote that as many as 15% of all footnotes
contain errors of one kind or another.  See also Bert Boyce and
Carolyn Sue Banning, "Data Accuracy in Citation Studies," RQ
18:4 (Summer 1979), 349-350.
 
Elliot Palais, Social Sciences Coordinator
Arizona State University Libraries,
Tempe, AZ 85287; IACESP@ASUACAD; IACESP@ASUVM.INRE.ASU.EDU
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 12 Jul 1995 08:59:07 EDT
Reply-To:     "Paul W. Grimes" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Paul W. Grimes" 
Subject:      Library Technology Data
 
 
Colleagues -
 
As part of a research project I am in need of a time series
which measures the penetration of computerized technology in
libraries.  For example, the number of on-line catalogues in
use, the purchase of electronic databases, etc.  Some proxy
for the extent of technological change.  I need annual data
going back about 30 years.  Does anyone on this list have
any ideas or suggestions where to find such a measure?  As
I am not a member of the list, please contact me directly at
the e-mail address below.
 
Thanks in advance!
 
Paul
 
pwg1@Ra.MsState.Edu
 
 
--
|  Paul W. Grimes, Ph.D.                Voice:    (601)325-1987        |
|  Professor of Economics               FAX:      (601)325-1977        |
|  Mississippi State University                                        |
|  Mississippi State, MS  39762-9580    Internet: pwg1@Ra.MsState.Edu  |
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 12 Jul 1995 08:59:35 EDT
Reply-To:     ASTD Information Center 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         ASTD Information Center 
Subject:      Update to ASTD Technical & Skills Training Conference
X-cc:         catalyst@vtvm1.cc.vt.edu, cause-l@max.cc.uregina.ca,
              commcoll@ukcc.uky.edu, comp-literacy@uwm.edu,
              computer-training@bilbo.isu.edu, cread@vm1.yorku.ca,
              cti-l@irlearn.ucd.ie, educom-w@bitnic.cren.net,
              ipct-l@guvm.ccf.georgetown.edu, itte@deakin.oz.au,
              j@transcom.capcon.net
 
I am posting this for an unwired co-worker.  For questions, more
information, or if you would like to receive a brochure please call ASTD
customer service at 703/683-8100.  Thanks (Jeanette)
 
SB: Update to Technical and Skills Training Conference
From: American Society for Training and Development
 
ASTD has released an update of scheduled activities for the 1995
Technical and Skills Training Conference & Exposition, September
13-15, 1995, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
 
* Joe H. Harless has been added to the program as opening general
session speaker. His latest book, The Performance Improvement
Process, is the first complete curriculum for Performance
Technologists. Attendees will gain from his insight into the
current movement from training to performance, and examine an
organization model that addresses such a transition. Dave Ulrich
will be the closing general session speaker, addressing the
impact of human resources on organizational change.
 
* A third technical tour has also been added. Participants
wishing to tour Lukens Steel on Thursday, September 14, in
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, may purchase tickets on site (the
tour is limited to forty participants).
 
Other Conference topics for 1995 include:
 
* instructional design and delivery
* self-directed work teams
* using technology to improve performance
* designing multimedia training
* distance learning technologies
* accelerated learning in regulatory and technical training
* CBT and EPSS
 
A videoconference on "Interactive Training for Enhanced Learning
and Performance Improvement," with speaker Pamela Robbins, will
be broadcast via satellite from the conference on September 13.
To participate in the conference or to receive the
videoconference, please call 703/683-8100.
 
|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
| American Society for Training & Development        astdic@capcon.net  |
| Information Center                                 703/683-8100       |
| 1640 King Street, Box 1443                                            |
| Alexandria, VA  22313-2043                                            |
|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 12 Jul 1995 09:00:25 EDT
Reply-To:     Jaap Jasperse 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Jaap Jasperse 
Subject:      Re: editors and "corruption"
 
David Stodolsky  wrote:
>Yes, and with on-line documents, errors can be fixed as they are pointed
>out to the author. Authors may be sloppy, but there are no institutionalized
>sources of corruption as is the case with edited journals.
----------
 
I can't believe what I'm reading here: are we discussing or mud slinging?
 
As the editor of a quarterly national scientific journal since 1986 I have
heard the odd sour note; generally I receive appreciation from authors
whose material I see into print in an internationally recognised medium.
 
Sure, papers get rejected; the odd poor paper, and some errors slip through.
Sure, refereeing is not always constructive and can cause major delays.
Sure, a quarterly journal implies delays between acceptance and publication.
Sure, distribution is a problem, especially with journals of regional coverage
 
But on balance?
 
I can't help feeling that the arguments Stodolsky put forward (and his
extracts from a previous discussion) are in a similar category as the
recent furore about cyberporn - that you will have seen or heard as
something like:
           "A university study has shown that over 80% of
             images on the internet are pornographic"
There sure is some of that stuff out there, and if you look hard enough in
the wrong places you'll find it - just like when you seek it in supermarkets.
 
I think Editors see themselves as quality controllers, and if it wasn't for
them there would be a lot more rubbish and poorly finished material about.
 
Interestingly, one of the main holdups in my journal's production process
is the time authors take to REVISE their manuscripts. Many appear to enjoy
the opportunity to revisit their draft after some "time out", before they
commit themselves to the formal, permanent record. And I happen to think
that the opportunity to permanently revise documents is no advantage at all.
 
Indeed the matter of version control in electronic publishing has to my
knowledge been very poorly addressed to date.
 
Imagine citing: "Author so and so said in http://xxx (document accessed:
-date-)  this and that, but on (-later date-) this appeared to have changed
to this and those and by the time you read the present document I'm not
sure what Author so and so's point of view is ..."
 
My implication is that "perpetual revision" will go well beyond typos.
Without a permanent record on paper (or CD-ROM, as I have argued elsewhere:
JASIS 45(10):777-784), scientific publishing has no leg to stand on.
 
We're all trying very hard (me included: see my home page) to improve
ink-on-paper publishing, and it's good to see that, in some fields,
answers are starting to emerge.  But let's be VERY careful not to throw
out the baby (or should that be the senior citizen?) with the bath-water.
 
Jaap
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~ J. A. Jasperse, PhD   ["Yahp YAHS-pur-suh"] ~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
        Scientific Editor, Electronic Publisher (CD-ROM, WWW)
          SIR Publishing / The Royal Society of New Zealand
   11 Turnbull St, Thorndon, P.O. Box 399, Wellington, New Zealand
     Phone +64-4-472 7421, Fax 473 1841, E-mail jaap@rsnz.govt.nz
              Home page http://jasperse.rsnz.govt.nz
 
~~~~~ CD-ROM: permanent land marks for fleeting internet traffic ~~~~~
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 13 Jul 1995 09:48:21 EDT
Reply-To:     Geoffrey Eaton EXTEP 31834 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Geoffrey Eaton EXTEP 31834 
Subject:      Re: e-journal budgets
 
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
        I'm troubled by the abundant pettiness, sniping, and folly that
constitute what passes for dialogue on this list. The strident and unconsidered
opinions of the avatars of electronic publishing would be pernicious were they
not so laughable. I must bow, though, to the adolescent hubris that allows them
to hold, for example, the rather odd view that since not all referees are
qualified, all refereeing is undesirable; or the similar view that since editors
sometimes err, editing is a waste of time.  Even that sort of childish fallacy
is preferable to the anonymous letter I received over the 'net this morning,
which whined to the effect that since a journal hadn't accepted his article, the
reviewers must be incompetent and the process corrupt.  Perhaps, but there is an
alternative interpretation for such rejections....
 
        Even if it is true that a refereed medical journal was responsible for
the Dalkon Shield disaster, one cannot rationally argue for the abandonment of
refereeing on that basis. Whatever the system's flaws, it serves the admirable
purpose of screening the obviously unworthy, the irresponsible, and the shoddy
from publication. When it (inevitably) errs, it errs--usually-- on the side of
caution and integrity.
 
        The argument, in any case, is moot.  In most fields, the most heavily
refereed journals will continue to hold the greatest prestige.  There is already
a glut of academic journals; anyone, as matters stand today, can publish any
sort of tripe she can churn out.  Judicious refereeing-- especially in
electronic journals-- is the only means of separating the valuable from the
vapid...which, I suppose, is why the digital fetishists oppose it.
 
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 13 Jul 1995 09:50:38 EDT
Reply-To:     Francis Barba 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Francis Barba 
Organization: Rechenzentrum Universitaet Hohenheim
Subject:      ANNOUNCE: The Eusidic Annual Conference 1995 - 25 years of
              Electronic Information - Barry Mahon
 
The HTML version : http://www.crpcu.lu/eusidic/conference.html
 
                    *----------------------------------------*
 
                              EVOLVING or REVOLVING
                        25 years of Electronic Information
 
 
                        The Eusidic Annual Conference 1995
                               October 17, 18, 19
 
 
                      Huis ter Duin Hotel, Noordwijk aan Zee
                                 The Netherlands
 
                    *----------------------------------------*
 
On April 20th 1970 a small group of organisations set up an Association to
"further the interests of operators of data tapes"
 
Thus was founded EUSIDIC, the European Association of Information Services.
Over the last 25 years Eusidic has grown to include a unique mixture of
major players
 
from all branches of Information, including major users, publishers and
distributors from virtually every country in Europe - West and East, and
beyond.
 
Eusidic is the largest association of its kind in Europe and can claim to be
the representative of the widest set of interests in what is prospected as the
21st century's major industry.
 
The 25th Anniversary Conference will review the state of the art and introduce
new ideas, a still valid formula which was at the heart of the founders
requirements.
 
 
                    *----------------------------------------*
 
                            - PROGRAMME & APPLICATION -
 
 
Tuesday 17 October '95
 
a.m.
The Keynote Speeches
 
Robert Hall,      former President, Thomson Information/Publishing Group;
Frau Ebe Ilmaier, Head of Information & Systems, Shell International, the
Hague;
Hermann Pabbruwe, President, Wolters Kluwer.
 
 
p.m.
Barriers to information use
 
Toby Chaum,       Digicash, on the prospects for secure, anonymous, electronic
payments;
Richard Black,    Personal Library Software, will discuss interface strategies
                  for different markets;
Douglas Armati,   on the problems and possible solutions for Intellectual
                  Property management;
Jak Boumans,      on dealing with multiple 'document' types, medias and
formats.
 
 
 
 
Wednesday 18 October '95
 
a.m.
Mass markets
 
Patrick Gibbins,  Maris Multimedia, UK;
Christian Bruck,  Europe Online, Luxembourg;
Hans Dinklo,      IT & Electronic Media, NL;
Eudald Domenech,  Servicom, Barcelona.
 
Will describe their experiences and analysis of the "mass market" for
information
products & services.
 
 
p.m.
Information managers
 
Elisabeth Gayon,  Elf Aquitaine and Professor Albert Angehrn from Insead will
discuss - "Who manages information" in today's organisation".
They will debate the issue with a distinguished panel of information managers.
 
At the end of the afternoon there will a report and discussion on Eusidic's
activities
and work programme.
 
 
 
 
Thursday 19 October '95
 
Mergers & Acquisitions
 
The commercial development of the information sector, in particular the
tendency
to concentration, and the development of strategic alliances, will be the
subject
of papers by Rosalind Resnick,  editor of Interactive Publishing Alert; Harry
Collier,
founder editor of Monitor, Liz Sharpe, well known as a 'company doctor' in
the field and Max Henry of Information Access Corporation.
 
 
The changes in roles
 
On Thursday afternoon there will be a session entitled  "The Information Chain
-
a paradigm lost?" It will include presentations by Bonnie Lawlor, formerly of
ISI;
Prof. Stevan Harnad author, and editor of electronic journals;  Sally Morris,
a Director of Wiley, on the publishers role and Prof. Charles Oppenheim, who
will
examine the new roles of the information professional.
 
                    *----------------------------------------*
 
Location: The Conference will be held in the 5 star Grand Hotel Huis ter Duin,
on the coast about 20 Km from Amsterdam and about 15 kms from Schipol Airport.
 
Transport will be arranged for delegates, to and from Schipol and Amsterdam.
 
Hotel Reservations: Eusidic can make reservations for delegates at the special
conference rate of 141 ECU single; 155 double, per night. Reservations are firm
and payable unless cancelled by 15 Sept. Substitution is permitted.
 
                    *----------------------------------------*
 
                               - APPLICATION FORM -
 
Name:
Organisation:
Address:
Post Code:
Country:
Tel:
Fax:
 
wishes to register for the Eusidic Conference in Noordwijk, 17 - 19 October
1995.
 
Fees:     Eusidic Members:   350 ECU ($ 470)
          Non-members:       550 ECU ($ 670)
Invoices will be issued; they are payable, at latest, by 1 October
 
Your VAT(TVA, Mwst, etc.) Number:
 
Hotel Booking- Please reserve accommodation for:
Saturday  October 14
Sunday    October 15
Monday    October 16
Tuesday   October 17
Wednesday October 18
Thursday  October 19
Friday    October 20
 
Other dates (specify):
 
Hotel bills will be paid directly by delegates, on departure.
 
Signed:
Date:
 
Send to:  Eusidic, PO Box 1416, L-1014 Luxembourg
Fax:      (+352) 250 750 222
Email:    nuala.mahon@dm.rs.ch
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 14 Jul 1995 09:33:58 EDT
Reply-To:     psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Peter Graham,
              Rutgers University Libraries" 
Subject:      Re: e-journals preservation
X-cc:         vpiejl@gandalf.rutgers.edu
In-Reply-To:  Your message of Fri, 23 Jun 1995 12:59:26 EDT
 
From:  Peter Graham, Rutgers University Libraries
 
On Jun 23, Chris Rusbridge said,
>ery long term preservation is a serious problem which we have to tackle,
although I don't necessarily draw the same conclusion. Since we do not
have publishers with guaranteed very long term viability, we must carry
out preservation some other way. It may be that libraries, deposit
libraries or national archives might have a role to play.<
 
The library community is beginning to deal with this as an issue; we see it
as a responsibility for a digital research library.  For a beginning
bibliography on the topic, see

 
--pg
 
Peter Graham    psgraham@gandalf.rutgers.edu    Rutgers University Libraries
169 College Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08903   (908)445-5908; fax (908)445-5888
              
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 14 Jul 1995 09:35:11 EDT
Reply-To:     Damien Keown 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Damien Keown 
Subject:      Re: editors and "corruption"
 
At 09:00 12/07/95 EDT, Jaap Jasperse complained:
 
>I can't believe what I'm reading here: are we discussing or mud slinging?
 
.. and then proceeded to sling a little mud himself:
 
>Imagine citing: "Author so and so said in http://xxx (document accessed:
>-date-)  this and that, but on (-later date-) this appeared to have changed
>to this and those and by the time you read the present document I'm not
>sure what Author so and so's point of view is ..."
>
>My implication is that "perpetual revision" will go well beyond typos.
>Without a permanent record on paper (or CD-ROM, as I have argued elsewhere:
>JASIS 45(10):777-784), scientific publishing has no leg to stand on.
 
Is anyone seriously proposing that scholarly articles published
electronically should be perpetually revised without any way of
differentiating between versions? ARE there any scholarly electronic
journals that correspond to the caricature above, in that they publish only
in HTML and offer no way of distinguishing original from revised versions of
a paper? If not, then perhaps we might ALL try to discuss these issues sensibly.
 
Damien Keown
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 17 Jul 1995 09:59:57 EDT
Reply-To:     "Charles Bailey, University of Houston" 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         "Charles Bailey, University of Houston" 
Subject:      The PACS Review 6, No. 3 (1995)
 
 
+ Page 1 +
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
            The Public-Access Computer Systems Review
 
Volume 6, Number 3 (1995)                          ISSN 1048-6542
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
COMMUNICATIONS
 
Roderick D. Atkinson and Laurie E. Stackpole, TORPEDO: Networked
Access to Full-Text and Page-Image Representations of Physics
Journals and Technical Reports
 
     The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Library and the American
     Physical Society (APS) are experimenting with electronically
     disseminating journals and reports over NRL campus networks.
     The project is called TORPEDO (The Optical Retrieval
     Project: Electronic Documents Online).  It involves storing
     and disseminating two APS journals (Physical Review Letters
     and Physical Review E) as well as the NRL collection of
     unclassified, unlimited distribution technical reports.
     These paper-format journals and reports are scanned at NRL
     to create CCITT Group IV image files, the image files are
     converted to ASCII files using OCR, both types of files are
     associated with bibliographic information, and they are
     imported into a client/server-based commercial imaging
     system.  A variety of retrieval techniques are used:
     full-text searching using fuzzy logic, bibliographic
     searching, and hierarchy browsing.  Client software is
     provided to display page images of journals and reports at
     workstations running Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS, or the
     X Window System.
 
     o    HTML file
 
          World-Wide Web:
 
          http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v6/n3/atki6n3.html
 
     o    ASCII file
 
          Gopher:
 
          gopher://info.lib.uh.edu:70/00/articles/e-journals/
          uhlibrary/pacsreview/v6/n3/atkinson.6n3
 
          List Server:
 
          Send the e-mail message GET ATKINSON PRV6N3 F=MAIL to
          listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu.
 
+ Page 2 +
 
COLUMNS
 
Public-Access Provocations: An Informal Column
 
     Walt Crawford, (for)Getting It: Toward Small Solutions
 
     Convergence is a crock.  The virtual library is a real
     impossibility.  Grand solutions don't work.  The real future
     is one of many small solutions pointing in many different
     directions.
 
     o    HTML file
 
          World-Wide Web:
 
          http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v6/n3/craw6n3.html
 
     o    ASCII file
 
          Gopher:
 
          gopher://info.lib.uh.edu:70/00/articles/e-journals/
          uhlibrary/pacsreview/v6/n3/crawford.6n3
 
          List Server:
 
          Send the e-mail message GET CRAWFORD PRV6N3 F=MAIL to
          listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu.
 
+ Page 3 +
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
Editor-in-Chief
 
Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
University Libraries
University of Houston
Houston, TX 77204-2091
(713) 743-9804
cbailey@uh.edu
 
Associate Editor, Columns
 
Leslie Dillon, OCLC
 
Associate Editor, Communications
 
Dana Rooks, University of Houston
 
Associate Editor, Production
 
Ann Thornton, University of Houston
 
Editorial Board
 
Ralph Alberico, University of Texas, Austin
George H. Brett II, Clearinghouse for Networked Information
     Discovery and Retrieval
Priscilla Caplan, University of Chicago
Steve Cisler, Apple Computer, Inc.
Walt Crawford, Research Libraries Group
Lorcan Dempsey, University of Bath
Pat Ensor, University of Houston
Nancy Evans, Pennsylvania State University, Ogontz
Charles Hildreth, University of Oklahoma
Ronald Larsen, University of Maryland
Clifford Lynch, Division of Library Automation, University of
     California
David R. McDonald, Tufts University
R. Bruce Miller, University of California, San Diego
Paul Evan Peters, Coalition for Networked Information
Mike Ridley, University of Waterloo
Peggy Seiden, Skidmore College
Peter Stone, University of Sussex
John E. Ulmschneider, North Carolina State University
 
+ Page 4 +
 
List Server Technical Support
 
List server technical support is provided by the Information
Technology Division, University of Houston.  Tahereh Jafari is
the primary support person.
 
Publication Information
 
The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is an electronic
journal that is distributed on the Internet and on other computer
networks.  It is published on an irregular basis by the
University Libraries, University of Houston.  There is no
subscription fee.
 
To subscribe, send an e-mail message to listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu
that says: SUBSCRIBE PACS-P First Name Last Name.
 
Circulation
 
PACS-L@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU: 9,392 subscribers in 71 countries (PACS-L
is estimated to have 10,000 additional USENET subscribers).
PACS-P@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU: 3,287 subscribers in 58 countries.
 
Electronic Distribution
 
Each article is initially distributed in both ASCII and HTML
formats.
 
ASCII files are paginated.  They are available from the following
servers:
 
     o    List Server:
 
          Send the e-mail message GET INDEX PR F=MAIL to
          listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu.
 
     o    Gopher:
 
          gopher://info.lib.uh.edu:70/11/articles/e-journals/
          uhlibrary/pacsreview
 
HTML files are not paginated.  HTML files may have linked GIF
files.  HTML files may have internal links, external links, or
both.  The editors do not maintain external links.
 
HTML files are available from the following server:
 
     o    World-Wide Web:
 
          http://info.lib.uh.edu/pacsrev.html
 
+ Page 5 +
 
In consultation with article authors, the editors determine
whether an article is updated, whether both ASCII and HTML files
are created for updated articles, and whether all prior versions
of an article are retained.
 
Print Distribution
 
The first four volumes of The Public-Access Computer Systems
Review are also available in book form from the American Library
Association's Library and Information Technology Association
(LITA).  (Volume five is in process.)  The price of each volume
is $17 for LITA members and $20 for non-LITA members.  All four
volumes can be ordered as a set for $60.  To order, contact: ALA
Publishing Services, Order Department, 50 East Huron Street,
Chicago, IL 60611-2729, (800) 545-2433.
 
Copyright
 
The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is Copyright (C) 1995
by the University Libraries, University of Houston.  All Rights
Reserved.
 
Copying is permitted for noncommercial, educational use by
academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries.
This message must appear on all copied material.  All commercial
use requires permission.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 17 Jul 1995 10:00:17 EDT
Reply-To:     Jaap Jasperse 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Jaap Jasperse 
Subject:      Version control on-line
 
>Jaap Jasperse complained.. and then proceeded to sling a little mud himself:
 
My implicit proposal was to "address to issue, not the person"...
and yes, the "citing updates" scenario I presented was a caricature.
 
However, we are seeing (for example in conference proceedings - including
one I was involved in putting on-line) that contributions are linked through
the author's server, so the author CAN keep correcting AND updating ideas.
 
Concrete examples:
 
ASTC proceedings(1994) http://www.rsnz.govt.nz/sir/astcweb/PROGRAM.HTML   has
a paper by A. Smith at http://www.vuw.ac.nz/who/Alastair.Smith/astc/astc.html
 
a more complex example: http://snazzy.anu.edu.au/CNASI/pubs/OnDisc95/
with Tony Barry's contribution available from
http://libmac21.anu.edu.au/OnDisc95/docs/ONL31.html         AS WELL AS FROM
http://snazzy.anu.edu.au/CNASI/pubs/OnDisc95/docs/ONL31.html
Are both files identical or is one an updated version? Is one merely an alias
for the other? I don't know, and I shouldn't to have to worry about it!
 
Although these examples do not constitute "electronic _journal_ publishing",
it is a trend in the grey literature that could well penetrate further -
unless we put in place some firm guidelines how to avoid or make use of it.
 
As I said in my previous message, "version control in electronic publishing
has to my knowledge been very poorly addressed to date" - yet we must.
 
Ziman's 1965 book "Public Knowledge" is still very relevant here, as is his
1991 quote in Science (253: 506) about publishing the traditional paper:
   "It provides a moment when a piece of scientific knowledge is frozen so
    that it can be criticised. If you're always trying to hit a moving
    target you don't get anywhere".
 
I genuinely look forward to further comments addressing this issue.
 
Jaap Jasperse,    The Royal Society of New Zealand, Wellington
jaap@rsnz.govt.nz    http://jasperse.rsnz.govt.nz/welcome.html
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 21 Jul 1995 09:46:45 EDT
Reply-To:     Hal.Varian@umich.edu
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Hal Varian 
Subject:      Re: Version control on-line
X-cc:         Jaap Jasperse 
 
>However, we are seeing (for example in conference proceedings -
>including one I was involved in putting on-line) that contributions
>are linked through the author's server, so the author CAN keep
>correcting AND updating ideas.
 
Here's one hack that would be a reasonable interim solution in some cases.
 
If you're working with ASCII files (HTML, TeX, SGML, etc.), use the Unix
system rcs and store the rcs files (rcs=revision control system).  This is
often used for source code management, but it works fine for any ASCII
documents.  I have used it for 3 books and all my papers.  It's standard on
every Unix systems and there's a DOS version available through GNU.
 
With rcs you have a complete record of all versions of a document, and can
restore any version at any time.
 
---
Hal.Varian@umich.edu                    Hal Varian
voice: 313-764-2364                     Dept of Economics
fax:   313-764-2364                     Univ of Michigan
http://gopher.econ.lsa.umich.edu        Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 21 Jul 1995 09:47:22 EDT
Reply-To:     Alan Burk 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Alan Burk 
Subject:      WWW Conf. - gateways and publishing
 
 
Please note:  This message is cross-posted.  I apologize for any duplication.
 
 
                      WEB CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT
 
ACCESS '95 - World Wide Web Conference on Gateways and Publishing
 
DATES:  Monday, Oct. 23 - Wednesday, Oct. 25, 1995
 
A single stream conference for 170 participants hosted by the University of
New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
 
Wu Conference Centre, University of New Brunswick
 
CONFERENCE HOME PAGE: http://www.hil.unb.ca/library/conference/
 
CONFERENCE FOCUS:   The Web is opening up to an increasing number of people
looking for information, and Web browsers are becoming the clients of
choice for accessing a variety of resources.  Library related vendors, such
as Sirsi and SilverPlatter are developing Web gateways to their products.
Gateways based on standards, such as Z39.50, are in the public domain and
are starting to be used by libraries to access local and commercial data
bases.  There are exciting developments with Web browsers, such as Sun's
HotJava.
 
In 1993 the University of Manitoba hosted the International Conference on
Refereed Electronic Journals.  The development of the Web and browsers
during the past two years have redefined issues of design, production and
distribution.  What will the next two years bring?
 
The University of New Brunswick is hosting this conference to explore these
issues.
 
SOME OF THE SPEAKERS:
 
      Keynote Speaker:  Clifford Lynch, University of California
 
      Electronic Publishing:  David Seaman, University of Virginia; Todd
Kelley, Johns Hopkins University; Terry R. Noreault, OCLC; John Teskey
University of New Brunswick; John Black, University of Guelph; Aldyth
Holmes, National Research Council
 
      Gateways and Web Browsers:  Harold  Finkbeiner, Stanford University;
Slavko  Manojlovich, Memorial University;  Art Rhyno, University of
Windsor; Steve Sloan, University of  New Brunswick; Mark Leggott, St.
Francis Xavier;  Neophytos Iacovou, University of Minnesota
 
      Government and Data:  Walter Piovesan, Simon Fraser University;
Tyson  Macaulay, Consultant, Canadian Cybercasting Company / Industry
Canada; Chris Leowski, University of Toronto
 
      Commerical:  SIRSI Corporation; SilverPlatter, Sun Microsystems - HotJava
 
 
COST:  $145 (Canadian) or $115 (US), including 3 lunches
 
HOW TO GET HERE:  The Fredericton airport services flights from Toronto,
Montreal, Boston and Halifax.  We are a three hour drive from Bangor, Maine
 
TO REGISTER AND FOR MORE CONFERENCE INFORMATION: see our Web conference
page     http://www.hil.unb.ca/library/conference/
 
or contact: Alan Burk:
            506-453-4740 voice
            506-453-4595 fax
            Burk@unb.ca
 
Funding generously provided by TeleEducation N.B., the Emerging
Technologies Interest Group, Canadian Library Association, and CACUL,
Canadian Library Association
 
**************
Alan Burk, Associate Director of Libraries
University of New Brunswick / Box 7500  / Fredericton, N.B./ E3B 5H5
Voice 506-453-4740    Fax 506-453-4595
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 21 Jul 1995 09:48:17 EDT
Reply-To:     David Stodolsky 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         David Stodolsky 
Organization: University of Copenhagen
Subject:      Re: editors and "corruption"
 
 
In Regards to your letter :
> David Stodolsky  wrote:
> >Yes, and with on-line documents, errors can be fixed as they are pointed
> >out to the author. Authors may be sloppy, but there are no institutionalized
> >sources of corruption as is the case with edited journals.
> ----------
>
> I can't believe what I'm reading here: are we discussing or mud slinging?
>
> As the editor of a quarterly national scientific journal since 1986 I have
> heard the odd sour note; generally I receive appreciation from authors
> whose material I see into print in an internationally recognised medium.
>
> Sure, papers get rejected; the odd poor paper, and some errors slip through.
> Sure, refereeing is not always constructive and can cause major delays.
> Sure, a quarterly journal implies delays between acceptance and publication.
> Sure, distribution is a problem, especially with journals of regional coverage
>
> But on balance?
>
 
The answer to this question depends upon the publishing environment.
With respect to ink journals, it is yes, prior review is the
best thing we have to ensure quality. However, with respect to e-journals
we can say that current models simply don't take advantage of the
potential editorial resources.
 
The economics of network publication don't justify prior review. But
posterior review is potentially more effective at improving quality.
The power relations inherent in edited journals are in contradiction
to the democratic structures required for the best science. They should
not be tolerated, if they are no longer needed. I urge you to examine
my publications and conclude for yourself whether these inappropriate
power relations are really required in the network environment. (URLs
on the original thread.)
 
The honest and helpful editor has nothing to fear from the transition
to network publication. He will be less burdened by operational details
and more able to help authors. The corrupt editors who benefit from
the current system only by virtue of their power positions are in
for a shock. This is happening already, both in science and in popular
publications (see below). The challenge is how to make the transition so as to
avoid a destruction of the legitimacy of ink journals before the ejournals/
assume their role.
 
The editorial role will always remain for fixed
media, such as CDs. But for the working scientist, the future is a
network where current knowledge is constantly being updated, and where
powerful search tools are used to determine the current consensus
in a field.
 
This gives an overview:
Stodolsky, D. S. (1990). Consensus Journals: Invitational journals based
upon peer consensus. Psycoloquy, 1(15). (Available by anonymous ftp
from PRINCETON.EDU in directory /pub/harnad)
 
dss
 
 ============================================================================
 
Forward of letter <9507080240.AA10012@hotpage.Stanford.EDU>
from SIFT Netnews :
 
Date: Fri, 7 Jul 1995 19:40:40 -0700
Subject: peer review scien...
From: SIFT Netnews 
To: 
 
 =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 Subscription 2: peer review scien...
 
 Article: comp.org.cpsr.talk.6202
 Message-ID: <3tinn6$sar@snyside.sunnyside.com>
 From: jwarren@well.com (Jim Warren)
 Subject: GovAccess.155:  CyberWire's Expose' of the TIME/NIGHTLINE Sex orgy
 Score:  65
 First 20 lines:
  This is a long but *imminently*-readable, human inside story of how two of
  the nation's largest print and broadcast news organizations screwed up.
  It details how human frailty, competitive mania and insulent arrogance at
  the top, combined to yield outrageously destructive mis-reporting --
  including intentional falsehood by implication and omission -- that now
  endangers us all, as *some* techno-illiterate, sex-crazed politicians
  pander to get their names in the sex-sells Enquirer-lookalike "news"
  magazines that are so zealously supporting and encouraging
  Washingtoontown's First Amendment Demolition Derby.
  Brock Meeks is one of Washington's most diligent investigators and most
  virulent - and candid, blunt and abrasive - reporters.
  His online publication is CyberWire Dispatch, an 18-month old net-based
  news service.  It is the father of the "way new journalism" that bypasses
  pre-landfill newsprint and megabucks ink-publishers, going direct from
  working reporter to modern reader. It practices a 'take no prisoners"
  approach to each story - as Brock sez, "It is journalism with an attitude."
  --jim
  &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
  Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 12:34:42 -0400
  From: "Brock N. Meeks" 
 
 
 
 
 Article: info.firearms.politics.6290
 Message-ID: <199507061740.KAA08856@jobe.shell.portal.com>
 From: chan@shell.portal.com (Jeff Chan)
 Subject: ACTION: Censorship and incompetence at the Journal of Trauma
 Score:  61
 First 20 lines:
  Date: Thu, 6 Jul 1995 10:33:56 -0700
  From: Jeff Chan 
  To: firearms-alert
  Subject: ACTION: Censorship and incompetence at the Journal of Trauma
  Date: Thu, 6 Jul 1995 08:04:28 -0700 (PDT)
  From: "Edgar A. Suter" 
  To: firearms-alert@shell.portal.com
  Subject: Censorship and incompetence at the Journal of Trauma
  If readers, particularly those with scientific training, are moved to
  obtain a copy of the Trask article and to send their own critiques to the
  Journal of Trauma, perhaps the wall of censorship erected by the new
  editor, Dr. Pruitt, can be broken.  A massive resonse to J. Trauma could
  deservedly humiliate Trask, his co-authors, and the obstinate and
  prejudiced Dr. Pruitt.
    *************************************************************************
    * Edgar A. Suter, MD                                      suter@crl.com *
    * Chair, DIPR             Doctors for Integrity in Policy Research, Inc.*
    *************************************************************************
  April 11, 1995, revised as requested May 15, 1995
  Doctors for Integrity in Research & Public Policy
 
 =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 For help information, send email                              HotPage Server
 with word 'help' in message body                 netnews@hotpage.stanford.edu
 =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 
================================== End Forward
 ===================================
 
 
 
David S. Stodolsky      Euromath Center     University of Copenhagen
david@euromath.dk   Tel.: +45 38 33 03 30   Fax: +45 38 33 88 80 (C)
=========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 21 Jul 1995 10:22:55 EDT
Reply-To:     Bernad Lukacin 
Sender:       Electronic Journal Publishing List 
From:         Bernad Lukacin 
Subject:      ACM-SIGGRAPH
 
The 1995 Steven A. Coons Award will be presented to Prof. Jose Encarnacao
for research in Computer Graphics, for his leadership in the international
graphics standards efforts, and for his leadership in projects applying
Computer Graphics to a broad range of industrial and medical applications.
This prize, which is the highest awarded in the important field of
Information Technology, will be presented to Prof. Jose Encarnacao in Los
Angeles, USA, during the SIGGRAPH conference for Computer Graphics on
Wednesday, the 9th of August, by ACM SIGGRAPH.
 
You will find more detailed and timely information at the WWW-Server:
 
http://www.igd.fhg.de/www/pr/index.html
 
 
+-----------------------------+------+
| Bernad Lukacin              |/|  //|
| Pressestelle                |-  // |
| Telefon: (49)6151/155-174   |  //  |
| Telefax: (49)6151/155-194   | //  _|
| Email:   lukacin@igd.fhg.de |//  |/|
+-----------------------------+------+